Mothering Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,057 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone used those plastic sheets that adhere to windows to retain heat in a house?

1) Does this stuff work?
2) How do you remove it?
3) Got any tips on how to cheaply conserve on heating bills other than turning down the thermostat?

TIA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
It's been ages since I've done this, but it did seem to help when we used it.

The reason we only did it one year is because you can't open the windows without breaking the "seal' - and sometimes we just want to get some fresh air. It comes off pretty easily but it takes a long time to put it up. I am pretty certain you can't reapply the same piece once it comes down. I think it was also not possible to pull the blinds up and down the way we had it installed...

Alternatives-

Check for drafts around your windows - seal them.

My husband used to line the base of our window sills with socks, to insulate against drafts. I hated the look of it, but you could really feel a difference!

I hang fairly heavy curtains in the winter - I think this keeps the heat in/cold out pretty well.

My husband's favorite advice - put on a hat! It's kind of an in-house joke at this point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,473 Posts
The number one way to reduce window heat loss is to lock them. I could not believe the difference it made. I heard it on NPR last week. We live in town so we need our blinds to function so we cannot use the window kits. But I find that locking the windows and keeping the blinds down as soonas it is dark really helps. Some thick curtains would go a long way to help too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,132 Posts
We use the window plastic. For us, it makes a huge difference! We have 2 huge windows downstairs (7' x 16' in 4 panels of glass each).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,323 Posts
We've used it in the past and it worked great. Another great thing that makes a big difference are those door snakes. You shove them up against the bottom of the door and it blocks drafts. We use one on our laundry room door(no heat in there) and it makes a huge difference in the kitchen temp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
959 Posts
Those plastic things really do work. I've never used them personally, because I've been fortunate to live in mainly places with new windows & heat included. But I've been in places before and after and it was a noticable difference. They're ugly and they make using your windows impossible. A major drag. But when heat is so expensive, what are you gonna do? If I was an owner of a drafy house I'd put it up in a heartbeat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,635 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by boston
Those plastic things really do work. I've never used them personally, because I've been fortunate to live in mainly places with new windows & heat included. But I've been in places before and after and it was a noticable difference. They're ugly and they make using your windows impossible. A major drag. But when heat is so expensive, what are you gonna do? If I was an owner of a drafy house I'd put it up in a heartbeat.
We just put one up last night, and I can hardly see it. I had originally just had plastic sheeting in mind (duct taped on or something), which would have been ugly, but then I discovered the heat-sealing plastic. Now, I obviously can't open the window, but I think it will help a lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,634 Posts
Last winter was the first winter I used the plastic window weatherstripping and it really did make a big difference. I didn't care that I couldn't open the windows till spring because when I wanted fresh air in the house, I'd just open a door and turn a bathroom fan on to help it circulate. It cut down on drafts immensely, even after putting down the storm windows and locking the frames. It's not really that noticeable under curtains anyway. I'm kinda embarrassed that I was so snobbish about it for so many years!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,450 Posts
I used to use the shrink wrap plastic on my windows. It was FABULOUS!

Now, however, I live in a renovated mill building with wall to wall windows that are almost floor to ceiling. The past 2 winters have been BRUTAL. I don't get drafts, I get a breeze! These windows are absolutely horrible!
I have no idea what to do. I don't think they even have plastic sheets that big. Even if they did, I MUST have access to the vertical (ugh) blinds because my son is extremely sensitive to light. I can't afford that much heavy fabric. I would need soooo much! Plus, there's no way to attach curtains (it's concrete surround). sigh. The walls that the windows are on are not insulated. It's just brick. I thought of taping plastic over the brick though...It's a start. heh.
It depends though. I may be taking care of an infant in my apartment (as a nanny). If I do, I will not put plastic on the brick walls...Too dangerous).

I'd love any pm's or email with suggestions!!
Thanks!
Liz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,774 Posts
Quote:
It cut down on drafts immensely, even after putting down the storm windows and locking the frames. It's not really that noticeable under curtains anyway. I'm kinda embarrassed that I was so snobbish about it for so many years!!
:

I started putting them in two years ago. And you can still see out of the windows and when I need air I will open the doors so it's not that big a deal for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,057 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hello,
I appreciate all of the feedback. Please tell me if this stuff can be easily removed. When the cold weather stops do you just peel it off or what? It sounds like it would be hard to get off. Please tell me I'm wrong!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,013 Posts
i was just wondering how that stuff worked. i have a sliding glass door that is single paned and old and the cold just blows straight through it. most of our other windows are good ones, its just this one i need to do something with.
my husband wanted to take some styrofoam insulation we have and put it over the door, then put my heavy quilt on the window(we hung the quilt last winter, helped a bit, but still cold).
but i am concerned with having the door blocked off, even though we have plenty of other escape routes.. plus, its my sewing room, so that will block the light.

so what can i do with this door? i;d love to replace it but we cant afford it now..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by Essie
1xmom
Finally, I got an answer! thank you. So it comes right off when you want to take it off right?

Thanks so much
Are you talking about the kind that tapes on around the edge of the window then you use a hair-dryer to shrink it and remove the wrinkles? That stuff is easy to remove. In fact, we haven't done it in our current house because our windows are low enough that we figured DS would just rip them down. Doesn't hold up too well to cat's claws, either. But it does keep drafts out well.

Or are you talking on the kind that is applied directly to the glass with a squeegee? DH just bought something called Heat Control Window Film, but we haven't put it up yet. This is a semi-permanent film. The package says it can be removed easily, but we obviously haven't tried yet. If it works we plan on leaving it up indefinitely - since it goes right on the glass, you can open and close the windows as normal. In the winter it insulates to keep the heat in; in the summer it's supposed to keep the heat out. The stuff we have says that it reflects 70% of the summer heat and retains 55% of the winter heat. Also blocks 99% of UV rays.
Won't do squat for the drafts, though.

Christy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by Boobiemama
i was just wondering how that stuff worked. i have a sliding glass door that is single paned and old and the cold just blows straight through it.
...
but i am concerned with having the door blocked off, even though we have plenty of other escape routes.. plus, its my sewing room, so that will block the light.
Maybe tape weatherstripping around all of the seams of the door (or since it's your sewing room, duct tape some leftover quilt batting there) then put one of the plastic sheets over the door? It comes off easily enough that you can still count on the door as an emergency exit, and the light can still get through.
I'm pretty sure that they come big enough, but if not, a plastic drop cloth taped around the door frame should work, too - just isn't as attractive.

Christy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,478 Posts
I'd use that shrink wrap stuff around the door too. I used to use it in an apartment I had in college and it was amazing. The difference in temperature was incredible and if you trim it neatly you really can't tell it's there. If you really needed the exit it would be easy enough to rip through it, it's very thin.

Lizc - I just installed curtain rods in a cement/brick wall. You just need a drill with a masonry bit and anchors for the screws. I was surprised at how easily I did it actually. It does sound like you need something to keep out the drafts and any weight curtain is bound to be better than nothing!
Another idea would be to buy foam boards (4'x8' size at Home Depot or some building supply place) and cut them to the size of the windows (they can also be taped together with duct tape on both sides if the window is bigger than the foam boards), then you just stick them in the window each evening. I grew up in a passive solar house in NE CT so we had to block up the huge windows every day too. They aren't pretty but they do make a big difference on the heat and draft front.

Good luck!
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top