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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello<br><br>
I'm currently a SAHM but considering going back to work in the fall for many reasons. DD would be 2 and a half in the fall. I'm really torn right now as to *where* to take dd if I do go back. I don't really want a daycare situation... I've looked at a few around here (we are in sort of a rural area) and many of the home-based daycares aren't what I'm looking for (too much tv and not enough direction)<br><br>
There are two local montessori schools.. one is certified and one isn't. They both have fairly low class sizes at dd's age level. My problem is that I'm not sure if dd's personality is a good fit for montessori education. DD is the kind of child who really needs direction. She doesn't like free play... she very much wants someone to interact and sort of "show" her what to do if that makes any sense. She likes to play with other kids, but more often than not, she'll just sort of stand to the side and watch if no one is really guiding her. She doesn't jump in on her own. I'm a bit like that myself so I know where she gets it<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"><br><br>
Anyway, could anyone share some more light on montessori at the two/three year old level? Are most of the activities guided or is it a lot of free play? the one school is really nice and I'd love to enroll her, but I want it to be a good fit for her, KWIM?<br><br>
I appreciate any guidance on this! I'm so torn!
 

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I think Montessori might be a good fit, actually. There is a lot of structure -- the kids choose their own jobs, but they have set times for everything, the kids are guided to clean up after themselves, etc. Once the job is chosen, there is a particular way you are supposed to interact with it, and the teachers will guide her with that.<br><br>
Of course, it really depends on the particular school -- Montessoris seem to be all over the map in how they actually operate!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your perspective! You are certainly right about it being up to the particular school.. the two that I looked at in our area are both montessori, but they are quite a bit different in certain areas!<br><br>
I guess it's the "choosing" stuff that I am worried about with dd. She seems to do a lot better when someone coaxes her into doing a certain task. When left to her own devices, she tends to choose something then drop the task a minute later <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> It might be worth a shot to try it though - the two montessori schools here are leaps and bounds above the other day care options for her age. There is one other option for her age that is really structured, but they are a lot more expensive and hard to get into, and I'm actually afraid that one might be too much pressure for dd.<br><br>
and part of it is that I'm worried/anxious about her going anywhere <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> I've been a SAHM for over two years now, so the reality of having her anywhere but with me all day is causing me a few sad and anxious moments, even though I know it's for the best for both of us in the long run.
 

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Awww. If it's any comfort, my daughter started Montessori at 2, and she just blossomed there. They played a lot, she learned a lot, she had a lot of fun. And it wasn't even a particularly great Montessori -- she had one snotty bossy teacher, and one kind of loopy one -- but it was still a wonderful experience for her, and she still sees some friends she made at that school.<br><br>
The toddler teachers are pretty hands-on, IME -- they do guide the kids if they can't figure out what they want to do.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>apple_dumpling</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7940787"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Thanks for your perspective! You are certainly right about it being up to the particular school.. the two that I looked at in our area are both montessori, but they are quite a bit different in certain areas!<br><br>
I guess it's the "choosing" stuff that I am worried about with dd. She seems to do a lot better when someone coaxes her into doing a certain task. When left to her own devices, she tends to choose something then drop the task a minute later <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> .</div>
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I think that is normal at that age and is something they work on-- completing task and concentrating. I think ds is very comfortable "choosing" in Montessori because he knows exactly how to do everything. There is so much routine and structure that he has the confidence to busy himself all day.
 

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Hi Apple_Dumpling!<br>
A good feature of Montessori is that since it is all individualized, if your daughter needs more direction and interaction she will get it. As her abililty to self-direct grows, she will be able to extend the time that she is choosing work in the class independently. The teacher is called a "Guide" or "Directress" because that is a more accurate description of the adult's role which is to be a dynamic link between the child and the activities. It is the child who teaches himself. Montessori originally called this "Auto-Education".<br><br>
Also, the children receive many different forms of guidance in this very orderly environment. Activities are color coded and the availability maintained for constant access.<br><br>
The order is comforting to them. Once they then gain an orientation of place, they are more inclined to explore, repeat, be active, think/reflect and communicate. Montessori called these behaviors "Human Tendencies".<br><br>
Her materials are designed to engage the child. The child is interested in performing these activities because the materials respond to the human tendency to manipulate objects, to learn from all the senses, and to do purposeful activity (work).<br><br>
Montessori really understood how to channel the flow of constructive energy. Activities that really seem to fulfill the child's needs.<br><br>
Like Flor said, children learn how to follow through an entire cycle of activity in Montessori. The overall objective is to the exercise concentration, independence and coordination.
 

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I went to an open house where a parent was sharing her M experience. Her second child was more of an observer. She said the teachers at M helped her recognize and respect his own unique learning style. He spent a lot of time simply watching other kids, but he was still learning... in fact, he would tell students when they weren't doing something correctly! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> Some children do just need to observe others for awhile before trying something themselves, and M respects that.<br><br>
Also, I think that in a M environment, the way the classroom is set up may help make it easier for your dd to choose what to do. The teachers will show her step-by-step how to use the materials. At first, there will only be a few materials she is able to choose. So, the choice will not be overwhelming. Then, other materials will gradually be added to her repertoire. The classroom is organized, so she will know right where everything is and where to find it. The classroom tends to be quieter, too. So, she will not be quite as overloaded sensorily as she might in another preschool or daycare environment, which may make it easier for her to choose.<br><br>
Good luck finding the best place for your dd.
 
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