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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I really need some advice.<br>
My son seriously isn’t getting enough milk. I am just not producing enough, I have always heard something like 98% of mothers make enough milk for their children, why am I part of that 2%?<br>
I’m not sure what else to do to increase my milk supply.<br>
I’m drinking only water and mothers milk tea. I am taking fenugreek, pumping and got some aromatherapy spray to increase milk supply. I’m starting to get really discouraged my son is 2 ½ weeks and still 7oz below birth weight.<br><br>
cross posted
 

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In a hurry, so please forgive the short response:<br><br>
Oatmeal (it really helps)<br>
nursing weekend- go to bed (topless) with babe and do nothing but nurse and feed yourself for 3 days straight.<br><br>
good luck! It will all work out.<br><br>
Also- was babe high-birthweight? Often those are slower to get back up.<br><br>
-Angela
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanx! I forgot I have been trying to eat oatmeal but not everyday, i will include that.<br>
ok a little more info he was 9lbz 2oz at birth...<br>
I will nurse and nurse and nurse for well over an hour and then he will pull off and scream. I feel so bad for him, I am just at a loss of what to do.<br>
I have given him EB at night or when he just becomes uncontrolable during the day but not really much more then like 3oz per day. I know I probably shouldn't be during this but I'm not replacing a feed and I'm so worried he is starving!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br>
I really need help
 

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Ditto everything Angela said.<br><br>
Also, have you seen a Lactation Consultant? Or talked to a LLL leader? I would definitely get in contact with someone to help you evaluate his latch and figure out what you can do to increase your supply.<br><br>
Good luck and ((((hugs))) to you Mama!
 

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Are your nipples sore?<br>
Does your baby get a deep latch?<br>
How many wet and poopy dipes in 24 hrs would you say?<br><br>
If you haven't,PLEASE contact your local IBCLC or LLL Leader!
 

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I third the suggestion to get help. Try to find an IBCLC that can do a pre & post weight. That way you can see how much he is transfering. Are you hearing active swallows??<br><br>
How are the pees & poops? What color are they? What was his lowest weight & how much has he gained since??? What was your birth story?<br><br>
As far as herbals, I prefer Mother Love Herbal brands. Quality of herbs can make a difference.<br><br>
There is so much to assess with slow weight gain. Getting quality help is key. Having unconditional support is VERY VALUABLE!!! Keep us posted. Hold Strong Mama, it will work out. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">s from a Mom that has been there.
 

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To make a long story short, my milk supply was so weak that I had to get milk from the local Mother's Milk Bank. My situation was desperate because my daughter had intestinal surgery and I believed that breastmilk was critical to her survival.<br><br>
Here is what I did, and it worked for me. Domperidone. That helped, but when it didn't, I also had lots of surgary, fatty foods and sugary drinks for me. Low supply? I would drink two huge glasses of Ocean Spray Cranberry Juice cocktail and eat a pint of ice cream. Then I would insist that my dh watch the kids while I tried to relax and imagine that I had fountains of milk in my breasts.<br><br>
Good luck. I don't know if domperidone is available any more. I had mine made at a compounding pharmacy, but I think it may be available from New Zealand. I don't know if it is legal, but it made a huge difference for me. Reglan did not work.
 

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My supply took awhile to mesh with my dd's needs. 2.5 weeks is still early. Is your partner home to help you? Can someone else? If you can spend 3 or 4 days doing nothing but letting the baby nurse as much as they will (and it sounds like he will keep nursing) I bet your supply will match his need.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br>
-Angela
 

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I agree with advise about la leche league. Friend of mine having same problem and she did a nutrition evaluation and found some it was what she was eating was causing baby to have tummy problems. Is now doing dariy and wheat free diet and it's helping.
 

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Also, there is a growth spurt right around two weeks. I know J could not get enough to eat during his early growth spurts and would nurse almost all day long. You are doing a great job mama!
 

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Dear Rainbowfairymama,<br><br>
Big hugs to you. It is so difficult for those of us who are committed to nursing to deal with problems with supply or our baby's ability to nurse. I had a very hard time when my second son couldn't nurse well.<br><br>
First thing, feed your baby. If your baby is nursing all the time and never seems satisfied, supplement him even if it means formula. There are many things you can try to improve your supply but the most important thing is to feed your baby...NOW.<br><br>
Second, start pumping with a hospital grade electric pump (a Medela Lactina is one of the most common ones) every two or three hours. If you can't handle pumping every two to three hours, pump as often as you can. Even if you have enough milk, you can loose it if your son is not able to empty your breasts. Pumping will preserve and help increase your supply. the Yahoo group Pump Moms is a great resource for pumping issues and support.<br><br>
Third, get help. A lactation consultant can help you determine whether the problem is your supply or your son's latch or suck. She can do a test weigh before and after a feed to see how much milk your son is transferring from your breast. She can also help you determine whether you need further help like an occupational therapist or a frenulectomy for tongue tie. A lactation consultant can also help you use an SNS or Lact-Aid supplemental nurser if you need one. It will allow you to supplement your baby at your breast instead of using a bottle. If you can see someone today, you might want to start with an SNS. If it looks like you might need a supplementer for longer than a short time, I'd recommend the Lact-Aid (<a href="http://www.Lact-Aid.com" target="_blank">www.Lact-Aid.com</a>)<br><br>
Fourth, work on your supply. Domperidone was a supply saver for me. You can still order it online from <a href="http://www.globaldrug.tv" target="_blank">www.globaldrug.tv</a> There are many other good supply boosters and also foods that you should avoid (like the herbs sage, oregano and peppermint). Check out the book Mother Food by Hilary Jacobson. You might also find the Yahoo group MOBI (mothers overcoming breastfeeding issues) very helpful and supportive.<br><br>
The website <a href="http://www.kellymom.com" target="_blank">www.kellymom.com</a> has excellent breastfeeding information, and I also highly recommend Dr. Jack Newman's book _The Ultimate Breastfeeding Answer Book_<br><br>
My second son was an inefficient nurser, and I lost my supply at two weeks because I didn't understand that a mother could looser her supply when the baby was nursing ALL the time. I did recover my supply and go on to feed my baby exclusively on breastmilk after some early formula supplementation, but he was never able to exclusively nurse. I pumped for him for a year. One of the hardest things for me to accept early on was that I had to stick to my pump schedule even if he was crying to nurse. It was very hard to do that, but I finally realized I had to when I put off a pump to nurse him one morning--two hours later, he had only gotten 1/2 ounce and I hadn't pumped... (If you want to know more about my story, I posted quite a lot during May, June and July of last year)<br><br>
I supplemented with Baby's Only organic formula and my son did very well with it.<br><br>
Breastmilk is best, but it is very important not to loose sight of the most important thing which is feeding your baby. Please, feed the baby.<br><br>
Best,<br>
Sarah
 

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I agree with the posters above who talked about the importance of feeding the baby.<br><br>
When I was having my milk supply issues with Rosie, Gracie still wanted to nurse. I wanted her to nurse, and Gracie needed to nurse for emotional reasons (she was only 22 months old). But an internationally famous lactation consultant who came to my home to evaluate the situation and help with my milk supply issues told me:<br><br>
"The first concern is to feed the baby."<br><br>
She was so right. So, if you have to supplement with formula, etc., don't hesitate or worry about what other people think. Your baby might be eligible for mother's milk (Rosie was eligible because she had intestinal surgery). So you could check that out, too.<br><br>
Good luck. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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Nobody wants a baby to go hungry! But giving formula should be a last resort, after a pro helps you try other things. Let the IBCLC help you find out if you really have low supply, or if it's something else. What looks like low supply can be a growth spurt, normal newborn nursing, etc. What were the circumstances of his birth? I've heard that if mom has tons of IV fluid during labor in the hospital, it can artificially inflate the baby's birth weight, so it looks like the baby has lost more weight after birth than it really has. We really don't know in this case. I'd hate to see you panic and give formula unless there's good reason, when that could cause or exacerbate supply issues.<br><br>
I hope it's going better! Update when you can.
 

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<div style="font-style:italic;">What were the circumstances of his birth? I've heard that if mom has tons of IV fluid during labor in the hospital, it can artificially inflate the baby's birth weight, so it looks like the baby has lost more weight after birth than it really has. We really don't know in this case. I'd hate to see you panic and give formula unless there's good reason, when that could cause or exacerbate supply issues.</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/nod.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="nod"><br><br>
This is exactly what happend to me (coupled with going to school and pumping).<br><br>
I put off seeing a LC and I regret it - it was a great experience and she showed me how to do breast compressions, improve dd's latch and to use my pump more effectively. The results were immediate of improving hte latch but it took a few weeks to get my supply up to the point I didnt have to supplement anymore.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Lula's Mom</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">We really don't know in this case. I'd hate to see you panic and give formula unless there's good reason, when that could cause or exacerbate supply issues..</div>
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I'd hate to see the baby go hungry while she's looking for help. It was clear to me after I gave my son the first bottle that it was the right thing to do. For the first time, he was satisfied after a feeding.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>rainbowfairymomma</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I will nurse and nurse and nurse for well over an hour and then he will pull off and scream. I feel so bad for him, I am just at a loss of what to do.</div>
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Maybe we really don't know, but this sounds enough like an unsatisfied baby to me to justify offering a supplement. I think offering via a supplemental nurser would be ideal or finger feeding or cup, but if rainbowfairymama hasn't found help yet, she may just need to use a bottle in order to get the baby fed.<br><br>
Sarah
 

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Rainbowfairymama,<br><br>
I have been right where you are and I know what you're going through. You've gotten some excellent advice here, especially from sarahwebb, so I just want to send sympathy your way, and urge you to call a lactation consultant asap. There is nothing like having a calm, sensible, knowledgeable woman come to your house and calm you down when you are in such a freak-out-ish situation as this. She will be able to assess whether your babe needs to be supplemented with formula (not the end of the world!) and what is going on.<br><br>
Please make that call. It was the best thing I ever did when I was struggling and hormonal, and not enjoying my baby at all because of the constant overwhelming anxiety.
 

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I dealt with this exact same issue. I ended up supplementing iwth formula, but one year later, I am still nursing some. It was so hard seeing my baby fight at the breast, nurse for an hour popping on/off, only to not be satisfied. Only after a supplemental bottle did he seem content. I do wish I would have used an SNS instead of bottles though, but I agree, the most important thing to do is feed the baby. Some of us, for whatever reason, just don't produce enough milk, and nursing around the clock with a fussy baby and tired mama is not going to change that.
 

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i want to second the pumping suggestion. i pump constantly. i admit that i really don't like it but i do it. my babe would not seem satisfied after nursing but a bottle of ebm would make her very happy. so in the beginning, it was nurse, nurse, nurse, bottle of ebm, pump, nurse, sleep, nurse, nurse. i always nurse at night. for some reason, that seems really important to keeping my supply up. i usually gave a bottle of ebm before bed. by the way, do you have any thyroid issues? it can contribute to production probs (i'm hypo and had lots of production problems that were lots of work to deal with).
 
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