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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OMG, this is making me insane. He throws EVERYTHING. When he is doing a puzzle and the piece doesn't fit, he just flings it across the room. He picks up toys, walks over to the stairs, and throws them down, regardless of how heavy they are. He throws trains, game boxes, bowls, everything.<br><br>
I tried directing him to where we keep a big basket of soft balls for throwing, but he wants nothing to do with it. I just can't keep everything out of reach - it's impossible in our small house, but it's also not fair to ds1 to not have any toys out to play with.<br><br>
I know this is a phase, but I don't know how much longer I can take it. The house is a wreck, game and puzzle pieces are going missing, people are getting hurt, and it takes a year off my life every time I am just sitting and all of a sudden a box goes hurtling by my head!<br><br>
(He's not verbal yet, if that makes any difference in your suggestions.)
 

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What I would do is to make a special effort to engage with him positively with throwing. Don't just direct him to the soft balls, but make a point a couple of times a day of saying it is time to play with them and play with him. Make up some games that involve throwing and really encourage the activity. When he throws at other times, I would give it very little energy but stick with your limits about what he's allowed to throw. Also, no doubt some will disagree, but personally I have no problem if he's throwing stuff that isn't allowed to be thrown and you've explained that rule, to remove the offending object to a high shelf for a bit.
 

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For some reason, my first thought was to cover his hands with something very sticky <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> .<br><br>
Though, it might be novel if you got a sheet of velco and things to throw at it. I remember ds doing the throwing thing. I viewed all small toys as ammo and tried to only have big things or soft things out, not practical in your situation with a big brother.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Roar</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7320762"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">What I would do is to make a special effort to engage with him positively with throwing. Don't just direct him to the soft balls, but make a point a couple of times a day of saying it is time to play with them and play with him. Make up some games that involve throwing and really encourage the activity. When he throws at other times, I would give it very little energy but stick with your limits about what he's allowed to throw. Also, no doubt some will disagree, but personally I <span style="color:#008080;">have no problem if he's throwing stuff that isn't allowed to be thrown and you've explained that rule, to remove the offending object to a high shelf for a bit</span>.</div>
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I second this we have son who'll be 3 in 3 weeks and we take the offending item away if he continues to throw it after he is told not to....I think it works well because it teaches him to respect his things as well as our things too...
 

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My DS is not much of a thrower, but it is something he has started to do. He is also not very verbal. BTW, when you say "Not verbal" do you mean he doesn't talk, or that he doesn't understand? My DS, doesn't talk, but he does understand what I say.<br><br>
At the moment I move everything that is very breakable, or dangerous out of the way. If he does throw something, then I check to see what the cause is. If it is a puzzle, then perhaps he is frustrated with the puzzle and needs help. If he is throwing something he knows he really shouldn't - does he want attention? If he throws something in a more mindful way, then perhaps he is experimenting and you may be able to redirect him. If he is throwing something and it's dangerous, (something I forgot to move), I will immediately take it off him and explain why he shouldn't throw it, (even if I think he may not understand). i.e. that may hurt someone, that will break, etc<br><br>
Saying that, if he throws something for the sake of it and it doesn't damage him, or someone else then I just ignore it. Walls generally can be fixed and my furniture although newish looks more antiquated with a few knocks <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> That way if he is throwing for negative attention, (to see if I shout, get mad, etc), then he isn't getting it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
By not verbal, I mean he isn't talking yet. He understands everything though!<br><br>
I could definitely work on playing more throwing games with him. I don't really do that all that much.<br><br>
With my first son we would put something up if he kept throwing it, but it gets more complicated with the second, because sometimes he is throwing toys that my older son wants to play with! Plus, I only have so many places to put these contraband items. And of course there's always something else to throw!
 

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My guy is really into throwing too. We keep all toys etc in their room (small apartment, they have the master bdrm) and that limits the mess and damage. I have to hover and be mindful when he's the table or food/dishes get tossed. Ditto for in the living room where most things are put up but not all, like DD's telescope.<br><br>
DS is also not very verbal (understands all, speech delay in motor skills).<br><br>
I know this phase will pass and that keeps me going. I do get frustrated. I don't remove objects as a consequence - the meaning is lost if it's not a toy and if it is then DD suffers the loss. Also we just don't do punishment - I can see in DS the meaning is lost anyways and all it does is make him feel unfairly treated and powerless, which doesn't help him learn to control his frustration, etc. which is part of the throwing issue. I do, of course, tell him firmly that throwing in that situation is not okay.<br><br>
But mostly it is being proactive and knowing it will pass.
 
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