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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know there are surely many many threads on this forum about US.<br><br>
My situation is a bit different. I will be having my 4th c-section with this baby, and I am not a VBAC candidate.<br><br>
What I want to know is, what parts of that awfully overdone (IMO) "routine" 18-20 week US do I need to have, knowing I am having a c-section?<br><br>
I know I need to check placental placement, due to the risk that the placenta could be positioned on the scar line. They would also want to be sure there is only one baby (as I had a "window" with my prior pregnancy).<br><br>
What else could the OB *possibly* NEED to know? I mean, wether or not my baby has Down's should not be of concern to him, right? And if we don't want to know that kind of thing, there is no reason for them to check that.<br><br>
What other things do these (hour long<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/yikes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="EEK!"> ) ultrasounds check for?<br><br>
Also- any links to the non-safety of US would be appreciated, as, although I will allow checking the placenta and such, I don't want my baby subjected to it for an hour, and I think that I am being reasonable in that fear.<br><br>
Thank you so much for any help you can give on this ladies...
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Peppermint</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6481736"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I know there are surely many many threads on this forum about US.<br><br>
My situation is a bit different. I will be having my 4th c-section with this baby, and I am not a VBAC candidate.<br><br>
What I want to know is, what parts of that awfully overdone (IMO) "routine" 18-20 week US do I need to have, knowing I am having a c-section?<br><br>
I know I need to check placental placement, due to the risk that the placenta could be positioned on the scar line. They would also want to be sure there is only one baby (as I had a "window" with my prior pregnancy).<br><br>
What else could the OB *possibly* NEED to know? I mean, wether or not my baby has Down's should not be of concern to him, right? And if we don't want to know that kind of thing, there is no reason for them to check that.<br><br>
What other things do these (hour long<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/yikes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="EEK!"> ) ultrasounds check for?<br><br>
Also- any links to the non-safety of US would be appreciated, as, although I will allow checking the placenta and such, I don't want my baby subjected to it for an hour, and I think that I am being reasonable in that fear.<br><br>
Thank you so much for any help you can give on this ladies...</div>
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It will not matter where the placenta is really at 20 weeks, that would need to be looked at later, at the end of your pregnancy if that is a concern. I am going to have a US at the end of my pregnancy that is "controversial" not just here but is not routinely done -- but they will be looking for any thinning since this is my 4th csection, my uterus is deformed, and my rupture rate is higher. They will check for placenta placement then as well.<br><br>
Also, so you know, a Level 2 US is not an hour, its 15-20 minutes long. It doesn't just look for Downs, however they will look for specific markers. They will determine an approximate gestational age -- which may be needed if you plan to schedule a csection. They will check for heart defects -- most can be detected by US, especially the more severe ones. Neural Tube defects can also be detected. Other birthdefects can also be noted, like club feet and cleft palate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks OTF, my major concern came about when not only this OB, but the secretary who schedules the USs said that their sonographer does take a FULL HOUR to do the US at 20 weeks. I find that completely unreasonable. I had these USs with my other pregnancies and it never took more than 20 minutes.<br><br>
I would consider the US you are having at the end, as I did have the window last time, that seems medically appropriate, an hour long 20 weeks US does not seem medically appropraite, ykwim?
 

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I wonder if they just say that it takes an hour so that you will be okay with it if they're running behind?<br><br>
Honestly, although you have the right to refuse procedures, you do not have the right to dictate how they be done if you submit to them. If your doctor is open to having a very brief US, that's great. But if you really want this doctor, you'll need to feel him/her out before you give a list of what's okay and what isn't.<br><br>
Definitely do tell the tech doing the US that you don't want the baby to have a long US and that you don't need to get good "pictures" of your baby. Don't provide a video tape. Tell her that you don't need pictures printed out. Unless it's important for you, don't ask to find out the sex. However, they may insist on doing things like looking for Down's and checking the internal organs. Some doctors simply don't feel comfortable delivering a baby if they don't know these things. I don't agree with them, and I don't think that an US is a good, fool-proof way to see if anything is wrong with the baby, but that's the way it is. You may find that your doctor is willing to let it be brief, but my experience is that many of them are not, despite ACOG's statement that routine US's are pointless and not beneficial.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>AmyG</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6482979"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Honestly, although you have the right to refuse procedures, you do not have the right to dictate how they be done if you submit to them. If your doctor is open to having a very brief US, that's great. But if you really want this doctor, you'll need to feel him/her out before you give a list of what's okay and what isn't.</div>
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I respectfully disagree. I think you can submit to a procedure and still play a role in how it is carried out. For example, I submitted to my c-section but refused to let me hands be tied down. At my ultrasound last week, I nudged the tech towards the things I was most interested in.<br><br>
I definitely agree that the best time to talk about the particulars of any procedure is before the prodecure. Maybe the OP can ask her OB what he is looking for in the ultrasound and the orders can be written to stick to just those things. But even if everything is not ironed out beforehand, I think we all have a right to participate in any procedure involving our bodies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>AmyG</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6482979"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I wonder if they just say that it takes an hour so that you will be okay with it if they're running behind?.</div>
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Nope, they were very clear (I asked about what you are saying) that the scan itself will take a whole hour, they like to be "thorough".<br><br><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Maybe the OP can ask her OB what he is looking for in the ultrasound and the orders can be written to stick to just those things.</td>
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That is my hope. I *know* there are things they check for that I do not want to know about, and won't affect the OBs job in delivery.
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>AmyG</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6482979"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You may find that your doctor is willing to let it be brief, but my experience is that many of them are not, despite ACOG's statement that routine US's are pointless and not beneficial.</div>
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Actually this isn't exactly what they say at all. :::sigh::: Here is a link from the ACOG site, the education pamphlet on ultrasound use in pregnancy.<br><br><a href="http://www.acog.org/publications/patient_education/bp025.cfm" target="_blank">http://www.acog.org/publications/pat...tion/bp025.cfm</a><br><br>
I think its completely false to indicate that they are pointless and not beneficial when in fact the ACOG is talking more about the US that are used for fun or entertainment purposes. I believe that many people here can tell you their ultrasounds were beneficial to them for medical reasons. I know I clearly can and no personally dozens more who have as well.
 

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You also need to talk to your OB about what he's hoping to learn from the scan so you can decide if this is the right time for a scan. Like OTF said, the placenta will move. That's why there are so many cases of placenta previa at 20weeks that "resolve" by 27 weeks.
 
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