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I am really curious as to how other people do the toy thing with their toddlers. Do you have a lot or just a few? do you do only wooden toys? How accessible are toys to your LO? Do you have everything where they can reach, or are things put up high?<br><br>
I really try to look for wood toys on craigslist etc, but after bills, I only have about $50 of spending cash each month for clothes, toys, haircuts, etc and I just can't afford it. So ds has a lot of plastic because that's all I can find in the secondhand stores. some of it is made in china too <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
Finally, I"m told ds has WAY too many toys. I do avoid battery operated things (the ones he does have were gifts) but I guess he does have a lot....here are pics of his room....I would love your honest opinion if I'm going overboard with the amount of toys....all of his toys are in his room except for a climb n slide in the livign room, and a power wheels thing. (Yes, I know it's plastic and MIC and battery operated, but he LOVES it!)<br><br>
please excuse pile of laundry on rocking chair <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"><br><br><a href="http://i41.tinypic.com/2it0eq.jpg" target="_blank">http://i41.tinypic.com/2it0eq.jpg</a><br><a href="http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=2it0eq&s=5" target="_blank">http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=2it0eq&s=5</a><br><a href="http://i44.tinypic.com/xptv88.jpg" target="_blank">http://i44.tinypic.com/xptv88.jpg</a><br><a href="http://i39.tinypic.com/97u2ra.jpg" target="_blank">http://i39.tinypic.com/97u2ra.jpg</a><br><a href="http://i44.tinypic.com/vredqf.jpg" target="_blank">http://i44.tinypic.com/vredqf.jpg</a><br><a href="http://i44.tinypic.com/29pcj2f.jpg" target="_blank">http://i44.tinypic.com/29pcj2f.jpg</a>
 

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I don't think it's too many, but everyone is different. Don't beat yourself up over the plastic stuff. Wood toys are great, but my dd sometimes prefers the plastic stuff.<br><br>
Do you feel overwhelmed by the amount of stuff? If you feel it is too much, you can always try rotating them. My daughter's interest in toys is ever-changing. I do try to keep out what she loves the most at the moment. For us this is dolls, animals, and everything doll-related. Her lovely wood blocks which she never played with are in storage, as are some of the other toys I loved but she didn't<br><br>
For us, too much is when I can't keep it neat, when it starts to overflow the bins, or when dd doesn't play with it anymore. I have found that when I clear out her toys, she plays more. I think that having too much stuff around can be overwhelming to kids sometimes.
 

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I agree with the pp. I've seen toy areas that have WAY more items than that. But if it is overhwhelming to you or your LO, then you could put some away for a while and then rotate them. It is like brand new toys all over again each time you bring them out. But if your LO plays with most of the toys that are available and you are ok with the amount of space taken up by the toys, then no need to change anything.<br><br>
And I don't beat myself up over DS having plastic toys. I thought I was doing such a great thing by buying him Melissa and Doug wooden toys, only to find out that their credibility is questionable. The truly safe wooden toys are hecka expensive...so we do the best we can.
 

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It doesn't look like too much to me. It seems we have more in our sons room. We have a lot of plastic too. Grandparents and such, plus like you, sometimes its what is affordable or what the kids actually wants. Don't beat yourself up.<br>
Is your child overwhelmed? If not, don't worry about what other people think.<br><br>
In my sons room, we have his little stuff organized into little rubbermaid containers up on a shelf. Then he has a big bucket of misc. toys and larger toys, and two other cloth bins full of geotrax and thomas stuff. He also has a bookshelf of books, and more toys in his closet that are kept out of his reach. Matchbox cars, and more thomas trains plus his puzzles are in there.
 

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I think it's a great room, I've seen rooms with many more toys.
 

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We don't have too many toys...yet...<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">. We try to keep the toys to a minimum. Plus, DD is more interested in playing with our things than most of her toys. My pots and pans, DH's tools, a basin filled with sudsy water and a sponge, etc. are far more interesting. She spends a lot of time "reading" her books. They are stored in her Radio Flyer Walker Wagon (that way, she can easily follow me around with all of her books). Otherwise, her toys are kept in the small office nook that is off the living room (no toys are in her bedroom). I purchased three wicker baskets, in varying sizes. They hold all of her other toys (with room to spare). This way, her toys are on hand but stored in an attractive manner.
 

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If he plays with and enjoys his toys, he has as many as he needs. If some are languishing unloved, maybe pack them up and see if absence makes the heart grow fonder? If not, they should find new homes.<br><br>
As for the budget issue, just buy one good toy at a time. You're not in a hurry. He already has toys, so now focus on quality over quantity.<br><br>
With regards to us...<br><br>
DD is 14mo, so perhaps in a different place than your DS. Her room is toy free and everything is in the living room in milk crates. We also have a book case there with board books and toys. There are 3 milk crates, some loose toys that won't fit into anything and the small bookcase with maybe 30 board books and a few sundry toys. I don't think we have much. She pretty much plays with everything (there are a few more advanced toys that she hasn't figured out yet). One crate is almost all blocks, but it's not full.<br><br>
We plan to convert the bookcase into a play kitchen as soon as DH finishes building her some real bookcases for her room.<br><br>
V
 

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Yah, I agree that it's not too many, but it's probably enough. I'm coming more and more to believe that toddlers don't need TOYS as much as they need ACTIVITIES. I'm getting into Montessori philosophy a lot with DD, and so many of her "toys" are things like, 2 bowls and a sponge and some water. Or a dish of beans, a pair of tongs, and an ice cube tray. She also has a dustpan and broom of her own.<br><br>
That being said, she does have grandparents lol... and an older brother. So we do have lots of toys. We have the luxury of a separate playroom -- it was one of the GRANDEST things about buying this house last year. So all the plastic toys and "just for fun" kind of toys go in there. This way their bedrooms stay less cluttered and are a more personal space for each of them.<br><br>
DS is 10 so the only toys still in his room are his legos heh... otherwise it's books and clothes and more books and other non-toy stuff.<br><br>
With DD, I've made her bedroom her Montessori "enriched environment" space, with the bed on the floor, shelves she can reach, all activities accessible to her whenever she wants. Things like wooden puzzles, shape puzzles, stacking and sorting toys, and the home-made activities are in there. The latest addition is a small set of (plastic, sigh) drawers, where I'm putting a few items of her clothes, so she can choose her clothes and get dressed on her own, without the trouble of the heavy drawers and the overwhelming selection in her big dresser. She looooves to get changed several times a day lol... and we've not had any 'getting dressed battles' since putting that in, fingers crossed!!<br><br>
I'll also second (third? fourth?) the idea of rotating toys in and out. Even if you don't have 'too many' it's a great way to keep things fresh for the kids. Most toys get played with for a couple weeks, then set aside for something new, as they've explored it to their needs and move on to something else. Putting this toy away for awhile gives them a chance to explore other things... then when they come back to it, they're ready to find new things about it.<br><br>
Anyway, long and short of it, her bedroom is completely designed to be child-friendly and her own space, the 'out of reach' areas are strictly for storage of things that are being rotated or being sorted etc. She can take whatever she wants, whenever she wants, and I only put toys of "educational value" -- according to Montessori principles anyway -- in there. Downstairs in the playroom is the 'junk' and the 'silly' and the 'noisy' toys. Actually they end up taking over the whole downstairs lol... but that's what this space is for.<br><br>
I'm actually getting some pictures of her space ready, just haven't finished yet...
 

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Toys are taking OVER here at our house. My son's bedroom is upstairs (we live in a town house, so lots of stairs) and he never goes in there (his bed is in our room). So his toys are in our living space (our living/dining room). There are way too many! We have an assortment of wood and plastic, though more wood...I'd like to get rid of some of the toys (especially the plastic ones) but my DH is convinced we should hold on to them. We are currently renovating the downstairs so soon there will be a den/family room there and I expect to move at least 50% of the toys down there, so maybe my DH has a point.<br><br>
Anyhow, a long way to say I don't think there are too many toys in your son's room at all. If you are interested in getting more wood toys, IKEA sells nice wood toys for cheap. Check it out! <a href="http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/categories/departments/childrens_ikea/10441/" target="_blank">http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/ca...ns_ikea/10441/</a>
 

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It doesn't look like too much to me! We don't have very many toys here but it doesn't look like you have a ton. Does your DS play with them all? I try to get rid of stuff DS isn't playing with or put them away for a bit.<br><br>
We have a mix of plastic and wood toys. I love wood toys but don't have anything against plastic, as long as it isn't a toy that does nothing besides light up and make sounds. Those I can't stand. But something like our plastic nesting cups I love and DS plays with them all the time. So I guess it just depends on the toy. However, like PPs said he much prefers MY toys in the kitchen, like pans and silverware.<br><br>
We have everything withing reach of him. I just bought a storage container for his closet that has baskets that hold some of his toys. The rest of his toys are downstairs in a basket. He's already sleeping or I would go in a take a pic for you...
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>waiting2bemommy</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12916207"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I am really curious as to how other people do the toy thing with their toddlers. Do you have a lot or just a few?</div>
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We have <i>two</i> wee ones (they're really more preschoolers now than toddlers, but it wasn't that long ago that they were your son's age), so have accumulated not a lot of toys, but I would describe it as a "fair amount." We do not have all toys out at once. We have a small portion out at one time, and try to rotate every couple of weeks or at least every month or so.<br><br>
I'm Montessori minded, and I believe that children really ought to have fewer rather than more toys. Most of what we have around our house are tools. For example, my kids have everything available to set the table at their level, stored in the dining room. They have a step stool they use to help in the kitchen and have access to kitchen tools they've been taught to use.<br><br>
My kids are incredibly inventive about the ways they play. Now that they're getting into dramatic play, they can pretend a random object is almost anything. They are highly, highly creative.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">do you do only wooden toys?</td>
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No. We have some really lovely wooden toys. We also have some cloth toys, some metal toys, and yes, some plastic toys. We have very, very few electronic toys. We've found it would be impossible to be "all wood."<br><br>
For me it is a question of quality and exactly *what* the toy is. Generally what we have-- whatever it is made out of-- is beautiful, simple, open-ended, and child-driven.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">How accessible are toys to your LO? Do you have everything where they can reach, or are things put up high?</td>
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Everything is within reach, and stored in a way that they can be seen and easily accessed independently. Again, this is the Montessori in me. The only thing we may start storing up high is board games. The kids are just getting to the board games stage, but dfd is still pulling games out of their boxes and losing peices when we aren't actually playing, so we may put those in a place where we encourage them to ask to play.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I really try to look for wood toys on craigslist etc, but after bills, I only have about $50 of spending cash each month for clothes, toys, haircuts, etc and I just can't afford it. So ds has a lot of plastic because that's all I can find in the secondhand stores. some of it is made in china too <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"></td>
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Looking around the room from the pictures you've provided, it looks like you have a lot of quality stuff.<br><br>
I see a nice wooden shape sorter, a lovely set of stacking blocks, duplo blocks (always a hit!), a slide-on blocks train set, some fun looking trucks to push around, some nice puzzles, a "roller coaster" bead toy, and it looks like some fun balls of various types and sizes (?)...<br><br>
You have made some good choices.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Finally, I"m told ds has WAY too many toys.</td>
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I was expecting to see a lot more stuff, based on your concern! I wouldn't be concerned about the amount, really.<br><br>
What I might consider if I were you, would be some minor changes in the storage and what you have out at this time. This is just me, and please take it with a grain of salt. Obviously you know your son and his interests best (and by the way, overall I thought you have done a pretty good job with storage...many items on his level, most out in the open or in clear containers where it can be seen, stored neatly in a fairly organized manner):<br><br>
1. Starting in the corner with the clear pull-out drawers, I really liked the way you grouped the duplo blocks and the slide-on block trains together because they are a similar genre. I might put the slide-on block trains in the lower drawer because in my experience, those are slighly on the heavy side in comparison to very light duplos and tend to get more use the closer they are to the floor. It's also "safer" to store heavier things at the bottom in a set of drawers.<br><br>
In considering the slide-on block trains, is he using those yet? I don't see your son's exact age, but my son was gifted with a set of those on his first birthday and took only a little interest in them until recently (he is three). If he's not yet interested in them, you might consider packing them away and storing them for a few months, or even six months or so, and then pulling them back out to see if he's "there yet."<br><br>
2. I see you've also chosen to place the shape sorter and the stacking blocks on top of the sets of drawers. Those are things that are at risk for dumping everywhere when a child gets them down, which could be discouraging, so I suspect they won't get as much use as they could up there. If he's not using them, try placing them directly on the floor, maybe on the wall next to the drawers where there is nothing pictured.<br><br>
I've found with my kids that shape-sorters are a "come and go" type of interest. At different times, they have different developmental reasons for their interest. If you choose to have a regular rotation pattern, it's a good toy to put away for a bit and bring back out at strategic times (for example, in the phase when he likes to "put stuff in" places, that's a great phase to have it out).<br><br>
I notice the stacking blocks includes a lot of blocks! Does he take interest in these? If he doesn't, try taking the largest, the middle-most medium size one, and the smallest and having those out alone. If this stimulates interest, I would start with that and then add in a few more blocks as he seems ready for additional challenge. Sometimes for a young tot (and again, I don't know your son's age), toys aren't interesting when they are overwhelming. Depending on your son's particular interest in skills, I could see that being the case with the stacking blocks.<br><br>
3. It's great to have some books at his level, and I like that you managed the amount and put some up higher. The books at his level ideally would be more visible, at least the book binding if not by cover. Another MDCer offers this on her blog as an inexpensive way to create wall shelves for children's books: <a href="http://pixiekids.blogspot.com/2008/03/books-books-books.html" target="_blank">http://pixiekids.blogspot.com/2008/0...oks-books.html</a>. You might consider something like that for the books you have on your son's level.<br><br>
4. I can't see what is in the "basket bin" right next to the sets of drawers, but I see the balls next to that. Looks good to me. What is in the green thing? I do think there is some issue of overcrowding on that wall. It might be solved by taking out a few toys for rotation purposes, or simply by moving a few key toys into other areas of the house. Still, not bad at all. I wouldn't call it "too many toys" from what you have there. A lot of the "bulk" comes from the size of the toys, not from the amount. I'm assuming everything in the dresser is clothing related.<br><br>
5. Moving to the right of the bed, this is the side of the room I find more problematic, but it may be because I am having trouble recognizing the purpose the big red structure is serving in the scheme of things. The bottom shelf on the left side appears to be something of a "toy chest" collection for all the little toys that don't have another place in the order of the room. Toy chests are problematic, in my mind. I would generally discourage you from using this space. It seems like a clutter collector.<br><br>
If you do use it, I would sort through the toys in there and rotate toys by type. For example, it looks like there is a drum in there. If you have a few musical instruments in there, I would have that be the musical instrument storage area for a few weeks or so, and then rotate in another genre of toys. It also looks like there may be some toys your son is on the verge of outgrowing in there, and at least one toy that seems redudant based on another toy in the room (the roller coaster bead toy). I would personally go through that space and weed some things out that my kid was outgrowing or not using.<br><br>
6. The placement of the "roller coaster bead" toy looks like it could be pretty problematic. If yours is like mine, it would be too heavy for a child realistically to reach up and into that shelf to get that toy and bring it down...most of those are somewhat heavy and a bit unwieldy for a young child to transport down from shelves. Your son, if he hasn't already outgrown this toy, may be doing so very shortly (my kids anyway both outgrew this in toddlerhood, though they did have a brief re-surge of interest in it as young preschoolers). If this is the case, I'd put it away rather than keeping it in his room. However, if he is still into it, I'd store it on the floor, maybe replacing one of the toys currently on the floor that I'll address in a moment.<br><br>
7. I find the puzzles also problematically placed. These too are hard for a little one to get down because the pieces will fall out in the process. This would discourage use. It looks like you could benefit from another very low, open shelf for the puzzles, stacking blocks, and shape-sorter, but if you can't swing that right now, would you be willing to store these on the floor over by the stacking blocks and shape sorter?<br><br>
8. The trucks are light, and as long as your son is able to get them down and is actually using them, they might be okay to stay where they are. In general, the red structure does not *look* like the most toddler-friendly storage structure, and I'd consider giving it the boot. The best use it seems to have is keeping the CD player out of reach (good call!). I'm not sure if that is a leap frog thing in the lower right or what that is, so I won't comment!<br><br>
9. On the wall to the right of all that, it looks like you have a number of floor toys. The first one on the left hand side of that wall, the standing electronic gizmo, I might consider passing on at this point. It looks like the type of thing that might be fun for a kido just learning to stand if you want something like that, but your kid is probably past that stage and if so, now it will become a very closed-ended toy for him to have around.<br><br>
10. Presuming the two "ride-on" toys are the only other things on that wall, that looks pretty good. If the "ride-on" toys aren't getting a lot of use lately, maybe put one out at a time and keep them rotating every month or so. They'll be more novel! But of course if they're getting lots of use, you could keep them both out if you don't want the hassle of storing and rotating.<br><br><br>
Like I said, take what I say with a grain of salt because you know your kido best. My overall initial impression is that your son's room looks like a lot of fun! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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Sierra, I think you and I think a lot alike. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
I've posted some pictures! Here are a few shots of my Montessori-inspired room and a few other things for comparison:<br><br><a href="http://flickr.com/photos/lovecat/sets/72157612128641347/" target="_blank">http://flickr.com/photos/lovecat/set...7612128641347/</a>
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>tankgirl73</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12917896"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Sierra, I think you and I think a lot alike. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
I've posted some pictures! Here are a few shots of my Montessori-inspired room and a few other things for comparison:<br><br><a href="http://flickr.com/photos/lovecat/sets/72157612128641347/" target="_blank">http://flickr.com/photos/lovecat/set...7612128641347/</a></div>
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You know what they say about great minds LOL, and...oooo...I love what you did with the shape sorter <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">!
 

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Thanks! It's so cute, even at 20mo she would trace the word left-to-right with her finger and mumble-babble something in imitation of me (she was a late talker). Now she can say (and correctly identify -- 3rd period lesson) 'triangle', 'square', 'rectangle', 'circle', 'oval', and 'parallelogram' lol... and she says 'octagon' though of course octagons, pentagons, and hexagons are tricky to differentiate. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Trying not to hijack the thread here heh...
 

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The room looks great!! I love that bookshelf on the wall, btw. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> DS's room consists of his bed, changing table/drawers, three tier bookshelf, three tier plastic cart for storing toys, wooden toddler table for art time, soccer goal and basketball hoop. Most of his big toys (race track and TTT train set) are downstairs in the basement and yes, most of his toys are plastic except for some of his puzzles and games - those are wooden.
 

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We have LOTS more toys than I'd like, the grandparents tend to spoil. We like wooden toys but we have a fair amount of plastic, too. I don't think your room has TOO many! It looks good.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Sierra</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12917642"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
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1. Starting in the corner with the clear pull-out drawers, I really liked the way you grouped the duplo blocks and the slide-on block trains together because they are a similar genre. I might put the slide-on block trains in the lower drawer because in my experience, those are slighly on the heavy side in comparison to very light duplos and tend to get more use the closer they are to the floor. It's also "safer" to store heavier things at the bottom in a set of drawers.</div>
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He just turned a year old in december, btw....<br><br>
In the drawer under the train set there are some melissa and doug wooden blocks.....he mostly uses them to fill up/dump out of his dump truck, lol but that is age appropraite and pretty much what I expected, so as long as he enjoys them its fine with me. they are stored under the train set for exactly the reason you mentioned...I didn't want the unit to fall over on him when he opened the drawer.<br><br><br>
He is actually very much into fitting things together, putting them together and taking them apart (caught him unscrewing the nuts and bolts on a chair yesterday!) so the train set, shape sorter and blocks fascinate him. the shape sorter is probably his favorite toy, with the wooden puzzles a close second.<br><br>
I love your suggestion to take out some fo the staacking blocks <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/duh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="duh"> Why didn't I think of that? You're right, he just dumps them out and it's probably because they're overwhelming.<br><br>
Also <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"> the idea for the books. I am totally going to do that!!!!!<br><br><br>
the green thing is a wheelbarrow. He uses it when I encourage him, because he is just walking and it falls over if he leans too much on it, making it a great learning tool to build his strength as he toddles around. The other walker, you are right, it is obnoxious and a "dead end" toy.... the batteries are dead, thank God, and I think I will put it on craigslist tonight.<br><br>
The big red thing is where I have been keeping the other random toys. I am kind of messy, so it has been good for me as a catch-all when I am too tired to organize and put away properly---at least everything is off the floor and the room looks clean, kwim? I put the puzzles up high because even though he loves them, he loses the pieces easily and then gets upset. I don't know what to do about that. I guess i could try just putting one down low for him to reach....you wouldn't think a 3-piece puzzle would be that hard to keep track of.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/headscratch.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="headscratch"><br><br>
I think I will also give the rocking horse the boot....he doesn't seem to care much about it (who wants a rocking horse when you have a TRUCK??!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">)<br><br>
Thank you for such a thoughtful post. Your insight was really, really helpful. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I don't think you have too many toys...I've seen some ridiculus playrooms before and yours isn't even close.<br><br>
I have two boys, 24m and 9m. We live in a small and cozy cape. Our space is tight and our closets are small. So I do try to minimize what we have and maximize the way we utilize our space. The boys play in two main areas: the living room and the playroom/office. These are the only two places where toys are kept (except his two ride-ons and wagon in the basement). For our living room I bought two brown faux leather bins for toys...if it can't be kept in those boxes we don't need the toy b/c I need MY space to be peaceful and I don't want to see toys when they are not in use. I don't want our house to look like a daycare. The two bins fit nicely under our end tables. The boys dump these out all day...these are their go-to toys. I keep this selection fresh by rotating toys in/out of thes bins and storage...doing this keeps me from buying new toys...Jack still plays with some stuff he had as a baby. You'll see in the pics of our living room though there is only one table and bin...currently we have a pack-n-play where the other should be...now that Liam is mobile Jack is having difficulty sharing and not hitting...so the pnp offers Liam safety from the fists. We just finished our toyroom/office this past week. We added the magnetic blackboard a few months back and DH made the kitchen set for the boys for Christmas. We just put the shelves up this past weekend. Everything has a place and that's how I like it to be...during the day my house is a disaster as the boys take out all the toys, but at the end of the day they all go back withall their pieces to their rightful home (I'm so OCD)...it actually brings me peace of mind to organize their stuff and know they will wake to a fresh space again. And Jack is thankfully becoming quite the helper with clean up now too (However, I am cautious to not pass on my mania to him). They don't have access to all their toys. I keep a bin with some puzzles in it and the rest of their puzzles are on a highshelf in the closet which I rotate. Craft supplies are kept high on the closet shelves...anything with a zillion pieces are kept high...he can have them whenever he wants but he has to ask and we practice the rule of you can have more when you put some away when it comes to closet toys he can't reach. What he can reach on the bottom two shelves is his cars, train sets, cardboard blocks. Anything on the wall shelves are played with daily and usually spend most of their time strewn across the floor. We are looking to add book shelves in here as they are kept in Jack's room b/c he has built in shelves there. Most of our toys are wooden but that is only b/c I have enlisted my family's help in that area. My family asks what the boys want and I give suggestions and option with links to different things at all price points...so that is how we have aquired all the nicer wooden stuff...I usually just buy the M&D stuff. I also had a neighbor who gave me a bunch of Waldorf inspired toys her son outgrew which was super nice. His birthday this year was the first time anyone bought him plastic toys and battery-op toys...my sis bought a race track for Jack (but we were arguing that week ad I think that was dig at me...lol) My dad buys one "big" gift for their b-day and for Christmas...so last year Jack got a beautiful set of wooden blocks complete with the pull along wagon...this year he got a great wooden toolbox from Rosie Hippo for Christmas and little wooden construction vehicles for his b-day.<br><br>
So here is <a href="http://s69.photobucket.com/albums/i56/Blueirises/?action=view&current=fd89c4af.pbw" target="_blank">our space</a>...<br><br>
I like your space...very neat!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>waiting2bemommy</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12923695"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">In the drawer under the train set there are some melissa and doug wooden blocks.....he mostly uses them to fill up/dump out of his dump truck, lol but that is age appropraite and pretty much what I expected, so as long as he enjoys them its fine with me. they are stored under the train set for exactly the reason you mentioned...I didn't want the unit to fall over on him when he opened the drawer.</div>
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I thought those were more duplos under the train set. It sounds like the Melissa and Doug blocks are the heavier items, so good call!<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">He is actually very much into fitting things together, putting them together and taking them apart (caught him unscrewing the nuts and bolts on a chair yesterday!)</td>
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Ooooh! Smart boy! Side note: You can make a toy he would love with a hunk of sanded wood and some large nuts and bolts (careful about size and supervision with choking hazards of course). Your local hardware store/Home Depot/Lowes are good places to find activities for kids.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">so the train set, shape sorter and blocks fascinate him. the shape sorter is probably his favorite toy, with the wooden puzzles a close second.</td>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I love your suggestion to take out some fo the staacking blocks <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/duh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="duh"> Why didn't I think of that? You're right, he just dumps them out and it's probably because they're overwhelming.</td>
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Oh I do that all the time. I look at certain items so much that I don't think of modifications for them that would be useful...I just see them as is. Glad to help.<br><br>
You can always just try it and see.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Also <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"> the idea for the books. I am totally going to do that!!!!!</td>
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It came right here from MDC <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/joy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="joy">:!<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">the green thing is a wheelbarrow. He uses it when I encourage him, because he is just walking and it falls over if he leans too much on it, making it a great learning tool to build his strength as he toddles around.</td>
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Sounds like it definitely serves a purpose.<br><br>
That side of the room has mild over-crowding, but could be just fine if it is working for you. If you wanted to loosen it up a bit, like I said, you could bring in some of the toys only on a rotational basis, or move some to another area of the house. The latter obviously wouldn't work, though, if you feel strongly about toys being contained to his bedroom.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">The other walker, you are right, it is obnoxious and a "dead end" toy.... the batteries are dead, thank God, and I think I will put it on craigslist tonight.</td>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"> Sounds good.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">The big red thing is where I have been keeping the other random toys. I am kind of messy, so it has been good for me as a catch-all when I am too tired to organize and put away properly---at least everything is off the floor and the room looks clean, kwim? I put the puzzles up high because even though he loves them, he loses the pieces easily and then gets upset. I don't know what to do about that. I guess i could try just putting one down low for him to reach....you wouldn't think a 3-piece puzzle would be that hard to keep track of.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/headscratch.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="headscratch"></td>
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Hey, if it works for you, then like I said, my word is a grain of salt <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">.<br><br>
The one puzzle at a time down low is appealing in that you could frequently rotate which would also be a lot of fun. I suspect that he is doing more exploring of the puzzles than actually completing them, given your description of him losing the pieces (wooden puzzles like that are often a toy that can be kept orderly fairly easily because "cleaning them up" is essentially a part of playing with them). If he was completing the puzzles more regularly, I'd be more inclined to say better he have access to multiple puzzles at one time.<br><br>
The other thing is that right around a year, both my kids were at this really great phase to begin teaching the basic concept of one toy (or small set of toys being used together) out at a time...and then picking up after each toy. This also reinforces the concept of finishing the projects we start.<br><br>
In other words, I'm talking about teaching him how to carefully take out something like a puzzle, do it, and then carefully put it back before moving on.<br><br>
It takes some work, but here's the thing. When they're little like this, picking up after them seems somewhat manageable albeit at times tiring. But as they get older, it gets more and more unmanageable. Might as well start some basic habits from early on. Not that he'll always do it, but right now he'd probably take a lot of joy in being taught an easy way to keep things "orderly," so I'm guessing his mind is ripe.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I think I will also give the rocking horse the boot....he doesn't seem to care much about it (who wants a rocking horse when you have a TRUCK??!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">)</td>
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Good point, and that sounds like a good choice.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Thank you for such a thoughtful post. Your insight was really, really helpful. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></td>
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You're welcome! That was fun!<br><br>
And like I said, your son's room already looks great, and like a very fun place to play <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/joy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="joy">:!
 

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We don't have a lot of toys because I cannot stand toys piled up everywhere. The toys that she does have are inaccessable to her and we bring a select few out each week and then swap with another group the next. THis way it is never cluttered and she doesn't get tired of her toys.
 
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