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Help! My baby is almost three weeks old, and I was diagnosed with pneumonia today. I was very sick last week (fever for 4 days), but have been fever-free for 5 days now and seem to be getting better everyday. However, I still have a nasty cough that gets very bad at night and is productive. While I was at my daughter's 2-week check-up I had our family doctor listen to my chest, after which she recommended a chest x-ray. And that's where the pneumonia showed up.
So, now she's prescribed Biaxin, apparently a cousin of etrythromicin (sp.?), which she said is "safe while breastfeeding." Of course, my husband gets home from the pharmacy, and the package insert says breastfeeding not recommended while taking that drug. All info I find ont he web says either that you shouldn't breastfeed while taking it or that no one really knows if it's safe for newborns so talk to you dr.
I haven't taken antibiotics in over 10 years and would like to avoid it at all costs. However, pneumonia is scary and seems like the kind of thing that antibiotics are appropriate for.
I have a call into the doctor to discuss if there's another, safer medication or if we could at least do a blood test or something to confirm that it is bacterial pneumonia (as opposed to viral), before I take any antibiotic.
Any suggestions? Anybody been through this?
 

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I just looked it up in Dr. Hale's book (Medications and Mother's Milk) and he acknowledges that there are not many studies done on this particular drug and its transfer into breastmilk.

However -- he rates it as a category L2 - Safer - "evidence of a demonstrated risk... is remote."

He mentions that it is actually indicated for pediatric use for infants 6 months and older; I know your DD is only 3 weeks but she would be getting such a small small fraction of an actual dose, if anything. Plus, the Milk/Plasma ratio is <1 -- which means that only minimal levels of the drug are actually transferred into the milk.

It sounds like your dr. knows what she's talking about.
 
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