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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Could someone explain this to me a little bit please? A friend of mine is 25 weeks and has been diagnosed with high fluid levels -- she's had four sonos (every two weeks) and each one concludes the same thing. At the last one, her doctor told her that the level was at 10. Isn't that a totally normal level? I'm just confused and trying to figure out if the doc is overracting or what. Two of the sonos also showed some sort of brain cyst, which seems to no longer be present.<br><br>
I've read all the "normal" pregnancy stuff online (babycenter, etc.) that explains this condition and the possible problems with the baby, outcomes, etc, so I guess what I'm wondering is what is the midwifery take on this? Also, is there anything my friend should be doing diet wise that might be helpful?
 

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Poly is often related to a diabetic-type condition. She may benefit from a really healthy low-carb low-sugar diet.<br><br>
I don't think there's a "midwifery take" on poly that differs much from the obstetrical views. We recommend a really healthy diet to everyone to avoid complications like this whenever possible. A true case of poly would generally be referred out to an OB. I'm not real familiar w/ AFI numbers throughout pregnancy, maybe someone who is will post.<br><br>
Is she measuring large? I would be a little hesitant to accept a diagnosis based on ultrasound only. You can test for "fluid thrill" which is characteristic of poly... basically you tap one side of her tummy and see if you can feel the "ripples" on the other side. Not sure how far along she must be for this test to work.
 

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Poly can be the result of many things: maternal diabetes, anatomical or genteic problems with the baby, or idiopathic (no identifiable cause).<br><br>
I'm not sure what you mean by a level of 10. A total AFI of 10 is normal, so I am assuming this was just one pocket that measured 10? Typically, AFI needs to be around 25 or greater for poly to be diagnosed.<br><br>
If diabetes is the cause of the poly than dietary changes and normalizing her blood sugars may help decrease fluid levels. It would be helpful to try and determine the cause, but that's not always possible. Hopefully her fluid levels will stabilize and she will have an uneventful remaining pregnancy and delivery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for your replies, I really appreciate it. The OB had her do the 3 hour fasting glucose test, and she was found to not have GD. I will still really encourage her to change her diet as if she were diabetic.<br><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I'm not sure what you mean by a level of 10. A total AFI of 10 is normal, so I am assuming this was just one pocket that measured 10? Typically, AFI needs to be around 25 or greater for poly to be diagnosed.</td>
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I was confused by this as well, because she did specifically say that her level was a 10. I'm going to guess that she didn't have a very detailed conversation with the OB about it, and that the reality is that he measured one pocket that was a 10 (he mentioned it was about double what is normal - which would indicate he was referring to one particular pocket). The doc is a perinatologist so I'm assuming he knew what he was talking about!<br><br>
It seems the only thing I can really offer her is to make her diet as good as possible, and to reassure her that it could mean nothing at all.
 

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on ultrasound in the lit if they can find a pocket greater than 8cm it can be diagnostic of poly so if they have consistently found a 10cm pocket that fits the criteria. if you have read the lit then you know that about 1/2 the time they don't know the cause haven't found a reason-- so beyond diabetes and fetal anomalies, and multiple pregnancy (specifically twin-twin transfusion) as identifiable causes- there are other considerations with poly like pre term labor about 1/3 of women with poly also have preterm labor - the presumed cause is overly enlarged uterus-triggering labor- but since we don't know what all goes into triggering labor we don't know what all is involved.
 
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