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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying for a VBA2C, and had an ultrasound today to check the baby's presentation. Baby isn't breech!!!

But, baby's spine is down my right side, and it's facing my left side. I went to spinningbabies.com to look into how to turn it, and I can't find anything about this position! The site says that if the baby is facing mom's right side, labour should be easier and shorter...that if baby is facing mom's back, labour should be good, and that baby facing mom's front is bad. But, I didn't find anything about the baby facing left.

Does anybody know if this is a position that should be corrected before labour? And, if so, do you know what exercises to try?
 

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Well I am asuming that hands and knees would be the best option. But of course 5 minutes a day probably won't suffice. Crawling around as much as you can is probably your best bet. And for me sitting, leaning forward with my legs wide apart and my belly kind of "hanging" between them worked as well. My little one was posterior and s/he moved into a perfect postion after probably 1.5 weeks of being in this position (almost always, LOL).

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'll try that.

Do you know if the left-facing position makes a huge difference in labour? As I'm VBA2Cing, I'd really like to do everything within my power to make the labour less traumatic...I am nervous about the rupture risk.
 

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Hey congratulations on having a birth to look forward to! I always think that VBAC is *just* a birth, and we don't try for births, we just birth
A little (or a lot!) of positive thinking can do wonders for a labouring woman.

Some women find that anterior is best but equally, for some women, posterior is just another position. What you need, and what your careprovider should have told you about, is optimal foetal positioning. And any skilled carer can feel by palpating your belly where a baby is, there is no need to line up for more ultrasounds. All the u/s is showing is where the baby was at the time of the scan. It's not wedged in concrete and is more than capable of moving, especially in a uterus that has held previous babies. You can encourage your baby to move very easily and then feel with your hands exactly where it is. You want to feel a bottom on the left side of your beautiful belly


OFP requires that you never sleep or lean to your right, but always to the left. Never slouch in arm chairs or couches where your knees are higher than your pelvis. Sit straight, lie on your left and do some hands and knees stuff if bubs moves back. Most babies want to be anterior but our lifestyles stop them moving. Just follow the instructions on the spinning babies site for general OFP. All pg women should be conscious of this IMO in the later weeks of their pregnancies.

As for rupture, well, provided you are not induced there is a negligible risk. Rupture occurs when the muscle is worked beyond it's capacity so normal labour is not a risk. Induction leads to c-secs for women without previous surgical births so it's something we all should avoid.

This might help you with rupture. It was written by a woman in the hb group I run.

Quote:
... just think for a minute. If you were in a terrible car
accident and had to have a piece of metal removed from your leg (sorry
for the visual there, ugh) .... say they had to cut in to get it.
Then they stitch you all back up. What do you expect the scar to do?
Do you expect it to fall open when you start to walk? No? Well, okay
maybe normal walking is okay, but what about running? Maybe running
will cause it to fall open. No? Alright maybe not normal running, but
I bet a marathon would cause enough pressure to just rip it open,
right? Hmmmm ... wait a second, maybe not. Perhaps if they hooked the
repaired leg up to a machine that mimicked running, it could cause
problems ... esp a machine that pulled the muscle further than normal
use would, that didn't do it "naturally" (kind of like pitocin!). But
for regular use, we expect ourselves to stay shut. We expect wounds to
have healed. We expect normal function to be obtainable for
straightforward injuries.

If we get a cut or have stitches anywhere else on our bodies, we expect
it to stay shut. If we looked at the doctor and said, "I don't think
this is going to stay shut", they would be highly offended because we
were doubting their skill as a surgeon AND we would be turning our
noses up at our body's ability to heal and reams of scientific evidence
that it does.

But then when we have a c-section, we look at that and think, OH NO
this thing isn't going to hold!!! Do you think the surgeon stitched
you up? Do you think s/he is a skilled surgeon? If your old surgeon
questions the integrity of your healing, then he or she is expressing a
complete lack of confidence in his/her work. Point that out. They
need to think about this. If your new OB or midwife is questioning the
integrity of your womb, then they need to be confronted about doubting
the surgical skill of your previous surgeon. If they doubt his or her
skill that seriously, perhaps they need to express their concern to the
medical board.

Anytime someone is stitched back together the ultimate goal is to
prepare the organ or muscle or whatever to perform its normal function.
I have had 2 c-sections. One was with my first and one was with my
fifth. The rest have been hbacs. All my births up through the second
c-section were to fairly tiny babies, weighing between 6.5 and 8
pounds. My sixth ... the fresh vbac who was testing out the surgeon's
skill ... was 11 pounds 4 ounces. I had some nifty pushing
contractions. And I can compliment my surgeon for a job well done
because her work held up under Normal Use. Giving birth is Normal Use,
yes even when giving birth to an 11 pounder. It is exactly what the
uterus was created to do. If we expect that a straightforward incision
and stitching should restore other muscles to regular use, then why do
we doubt the womb?

I will tell you what finally set my own mind to ease this last pg
because yes for the first time ever, I was actually nervous about UR
(something about hanging around ICAN where it is talked about all the
time, lol ... fear started rubbing off there!). My daughter used to
play with my LUS ... she would push and stretch and wedge herself in.
She would shove her hands right under where my external incision scar
was and do boxing drills. Maybe she could feel the ridge of my
external incision? I don't know. But what I do know is that I felt
very reassured that if she could do all that and it held together, then
what was a little labor?
I look forward to reading a triumphant birth story from you!
 

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There is a lot you can do to avoid a posterior facing baby. A LOT. I would encourage you to invest in Sit Up and Take Notice by Pauline Scott. You might have to buy it directly from Midwifery Today but the $15 is so worth it- to avoid back labor, need for pain meds, need for pitocin, possibly even a cesaren (lots of babies are born by cesarean because they're facing the wrong direction!).

It will help you understand the anatomy of your pelvis, and therefore how to get your baby to move around within it. It is a small, short book but IMO as a doula- absolutely priceless. I want every one of my clients to read it!

In the short term, go on the web and do some reading about Optimal Foetal Positioning (keep the spelling intact). Also read about posterior babies, as well.

It's so important to ensure good positioning before birth!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
There's no chance I'll be induced, as I'd opt for the repeat section before doing that. If I start getting a lot of flack about induction...well, we'll see. I know when my OB delivered my sister's twins, he was doing stress tests at the end, but wasn't going to induce without some solid reason to.

Janet: My OB, family physician and I all thought baby's head was down, but we really couldn't tell for sure. His/her bum and the curve of its spine felt a lot like a head. If we'd been sure, I wouldn't have had the ultrasound.

I'm trying to be positive - it's difficult after having a planned VBAC turn into a section with less than two days notice last time, but I really want this to work. This is baby #3, and probably my last. Even if it's not, I don't know if I'd be up for a VBA3C or not. I have to work with my caregivers, and didn't try to locate a midwife until it was too late...the only ones around here were fully booked up. That's what comes of just agreeing to a doctor's decree initially, I guess. At this point, I think I'm actually more freaked at the thought of ending up with an episiotomy than anything else...but I'll be discussing that with my OB as well. I think he'll be fine - I'm just worried about what will happen if he's not available when I go into labour. Some of the doctors at the hospital aren't as reasonable as he is.

I'll try staying on my left. I tend to shift a few times during the night, but I've been mostly sleeping on my left, anyway. I'll remember about leaning to the left, too. It's only about another four weeks...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by dynamicdoula
It's so important to ensure good positioning before birth!
I'll do what I can...but having had two babies turn from a head-down position to a breech position at the last minute (one of them during labour), I'm a little skeptical about this stuff.
 

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Breech babies can be birthed vaginally as well so if you're really keen for a VBAC don't let anyone tell you they can't. There are some important principles involved that most OBs don't seem to know but they are very simple and freely available on the net.

Stay upright.
No one touch the baby on their way out.
Keep the room very warm.
Simple!

A woman in my home birth group breeched a 9lb frank breech baby at home a few weeks ago. The power is yours, Lisa!

So many hugs to you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Birthing a breech baby as a VBA2C, without a caregiver trained to deliver one, is too far outside my comfort level. Whether it should or not, the idea freaks me out, and I know I wouldn't be able to labour well while being that scared.

But, so far, that's not an issue. Right now, my single biggest concern is that I'm really wondering if I'm going to wind up with either of my caregivers at my birth. Their holidays aren't timed well for me. Well...we'll see how it goes. I just hope this baby isn't early...or at least not too early.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by JanetF
Keep the room very warm.
Why should the room be kept warm? I'm asking because I tend to get really stressed and uncomfortable in warmer temperatures...I'm more comfortable when it's a bit cool.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Storm Bride
Why should the room be kept warm? I'm asking because I tend to get really stressed and uncomfortable in warmer temperatures...I'm more comfortable when it's a bit cool.
Not positive but probably because the baby's body will be out for awhile before the head emerges and we wouldn't want the baby to be cold?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That makes sense. Well, no worries there - our hospital is always too warm for me. I'm sure baby will be cozy.
 
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