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I'm posting this a few different places, so don't be alarmed if you see it more than once--I've been thinking about this a lot lately...how do you recover/decompress after attending a birth, and do you do something different after a difficult/traumatic birth? I'm very curious to see what you ladies have found works for you.

I'm a doula, but I'm sure this must be an issue for midwives as well...this is emotionally taxing and rewarding work.
 

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This may sound odd, but after a birth (I'm a doula) I am a bit on the weepy and emotional side. I feel the need to be taken care of and really just want a hot bath, some warm home cooked-type food, and bed. All that's hard with three kids and a hubby who has been taking care of them in terms of days sometimes!

I think, it's mainly all caused by a lack of sleep and a lack of proper nutrition that makes me feel this way. It is a good reminder of the mind/ body connection, and it always makes me wonder how the lackof sleep and food impacts the laboring mother. Anyone else feel this way? Warmly, Heather
 

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I used to need alot of time before I could go to sleep after coming back from a birth. Now, I just come home exhausted - even if it was a quick birth! - and have to decide between eating, sleeping, or taking a shower.

When I'm really busy, I end up showering first, then sleeping, then waking up a bit later to eat. That way, if I get called again, at least I'll be showered and have some rest. I can always eat on the way or at my client's home.

As far as any particular ritual, I don't really have one. I say a short prayer on the way to births, and breathe deeply before I walk into a laboring mama's home so the rush-rush of getting there will not interfere with her space.
 

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My first traumatic birth, I remember riding in the car, and I was shocked for about two weeks, and I didn't know how to talk to my client about it.

After a stressful/traumatic birth, I usually drive home without any music on. And do whatever comes next, whether that is deep sighing, crying, talking to myself. or moaning. So when I get home, I don't have so much pinned up energy on me from the birth.

Also, I do seem much more needy and drained. If I am allowed to, I play and talk to my children from my special chair/in bed or sleep late also. I also have two close friends (one is a doula and the other is my best friend of 10 years) and they listen to my story/feelings, which helps so much.
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