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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I'm 38 and half weeks and my midwife thinks the babe is posterior. I suspected something of this nature already, so I'm not surprised. I was told to walk a lot ( I already do) and lay slanted and a couple other things. When I lay slanted the baby moves a lot, but generally goes back to his/her usual spot later.<br><br>
Has anyone had any success turning a poterior baby prior to labor? I'm not really worried about it, but it would be nice. I am seeing a chiropractor and I do know that babies often turn during labor, but does that mean that labor could still be harder than normal?<br><br>
Any suggestions?
 

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My last MW said not to recline in chairs a lot. She also said getting on your hands and knees a lot during the day it can turn them. The theory is that the back of the head is heavier than the front, so if you're on your hands and knees the heaviest part will move down/forward. I have no idea if it works or not. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>thomlynn</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9037836"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My last MW said not to recline in chairs a lot. She also said getting on your hands and knees a lot during the day it can turn them. The theory is that the back of the head is heavier than the front, so if you're on your hands and knees the heaviest part will move down/forward. I have no idea if it works or not. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"></div>
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Definitely works! Think of your body as a hammock and how the baby would be most comfortable. If you recline a lot, your back becomes the hammock, if you lean forward/hands & knees a lot, your belly does.<br><br>
That being said, the VAST majority of babies who are posterior in pregnancy become anterior in labor, when they are trying to negotiate the pelvis.
 

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My last baby, #3, was posterior and we tried everything we could find (hands and knees, no reclining, lots of time on the birthball leaning foward, etc) to try and didn't have any luck until I went to the chiropractor. My sacrum was out of alignment, within an hour of her adjusting me, the baby turned and stayed that way until she was born.<br><br>
From what I understand... When you are out of alignment it reduces the space for the baby and makes the "correct" position more uncomfortable for baby. Once you are in proper alignment it opens up the space for the baby to move down and into the most advantageous position.<br><br>
Good luck <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Nothing worked for us either, so we tried everything. Finally, I had good luck with a knowledgeable acupuncturist who realigned my meridians (or whatever it is) and the baby turned right after the treatment.
 

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Have you seen the <a href="http://spinningbabies.com/" target="_blank">spinning babies</a> website?
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>hubris</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9040856"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Have you seen the <a href="http://spinningbabies.com/" target="_blank">spinning babies</a> website?</div>
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This was going to be my suggestion too. Good luck!
 

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First of all I desperately hope that baby turns for you! Posterior labor is rough (speaking from experience, but I reclined a lot from back problems). I think I would try everything besides manually turning the baby- I have a friend who did this and the baby ended up coding after she was born and in the ICU for a week. I have even met childrem whose necks were broken in the turning process and they are paralyzed for life. So just be very careful!<br><br>
But I agree witht he above- check out spinning babies, don't recline and be a hamock! Really make sure that you are sleeping on your left side more tipped forward than back! I'll be praying for you!
 

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I think doing what you can to get the baby to turn is a good idea - but I think both my sons were posterior for most of my labors and DS2 was born posterior. What I encountered was back labor (which since I didn't have anything to compare it to, didn't particularly freak me out) which I handled by having DH apply counterpressure while I labored on hands and knees through contractions. And both times I had uneven cervical dilation, meaning that transition lasted a longer time than it might have otherwise because most of my cervix was completely dilated but about 1/4 of it was not. Both times my MW pushed the lip of cervix out of the way while I pushed - extremely painful, but worth it.<br><br>
DS2 was pretty much always posterior as far as I could tell during the pregnancy. I think another time I would try a reliable chiro or accupuncture in case there was something mis-aligned, but I have also read that babies tend to face their placentas and if your placenta is attached to the front of your uterous your baby may be more likely to be posterior. I wonder if that was the case with DS2.<br><br>
Anyway, it was a little harder to get DS2 under my pubic bone than I remember it being to get DS1 under it, but I had plenty of room - pushed him out in about 10 minutes, with a small tear I chose not to have repaired. I caught him, too, and saw his face as he was born, which was REALLY cool (see my sig for the full story.)
 

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Yes, check out spinningbabies.com. Also ask your chiro if they do the Webster technique. If you can get your hands on it quickly, try to find a copy of the out of print book "no more back labor".<br><br>
I had back labor really bad, check out the link to see my birth story. Wish I had been prepared for it, if so I may not have had to get epidural.<br><br>
Do you have a doula or would you consider getting one? I'm sure you still could at this short notice. If so, see how much they know about back labor. But try and get that baby to turn to begin with <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have a chiro who does webster, i'm also going to go see another chiro for a 2nd opinion. I am going to a massage therapist today and am going to think on accupuncture in the very near future.<br><br>
I don't think the placenta is on the front of my uterus, I get so much feeling there from the baby moving that I cannot think that that is the placenta's location. I think the baby is posterior because my hips are misaligned and/or the muscles are tense. I have a history of those problems from riding horses years back.<br><br>
My midwife is having me take pullsatilla, a homeopathic remedy for posterior babies. We'll see how that works.<br><br>
I think I will probably being heading into labor with a posterior babe. I don't have a lot of "hope" that he/she will turn. So I am glad that I have a big birth pool and a husband who is willing to massage.
 

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Try getting a rag or a sponge and scrubbing your floor. I know, it's a weird old wives' tale, but I think there's something about the hands and knees position and the movement of your shoulders and pelvis as you scrub that helps motivate babies to turn.<br><br>
Otherwise, don't fear a posterior labor... it's not ideal, but you can do it! Lots of counterpressure and if you're in a bed or a tub make sure you have plenty of cushioning and support for your back.
 

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My midwife said to spend a lot of time crawling around on my hands and knees. Also to rock my pelvis when on my hands and knees. Like a cat kinda. Then when the baby's back is on my belly she said to squat a lot to get the head ingaged so the baby doesn't turn back. I had a breach posterior baby until 39 weeks and then he turned and all was well for delivery.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>prancie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9037076"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">So, I'm 38 and half weeks and my midwife thinks the babe is posterior. I suspected something of this nature already, so I'm not surprised. I was told to walk a lot ( I already do) and lay slanted and a couple other things. When I lay slanted the baby moves a lot, but generally goes back to his/her usual spot later.<br><br>
Has anyone had any success turning a poterior baby prior to labor? I'm not really worried about it, but it would be nice. I am seeing a chiropractor and I do know that babies often turn during labor, but does that mean that labor could still be harder than normal?<br><br>
Any suggestions?</div>
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Yes.<br><br>
Keep up with your chiro adjustments! Very important.<br><br>
I have BTDT with my first.<br><br>
The baby likely won't turn until the last minute as he is delivered, and posterior babes make for longer, slower, more painful deliveries, especially if it's your first. Back labor is a real [email protected]# - to put it mildly. Get as many adjustments as you can before the birth. And have an experienced MW on hand to help you through it.
 

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Good luck with the chiropractor! My chiropractor specializes in prenatal chiropractic and I have heard so many success stories. Don't give up hope! On another note though, my son (also my first) was posterior (I didn't start chiropractic care until VERY late, and we think he actually had to turn to be posterior during labor to avoid my very low placenta). Don't fear it. It is a difficult labor, but if you know your babe is posterior, stick with the positions that are most comfortable for you during pregnancy. These will most likely be the most comfortable during labor as well. My birth was a wonderful experience, and immediately afterward, we were already talking about next time. So I guess my best advice is don't fear your labor! When I shrunk from it, my labor was long and protracted, but as soon as I said "ok, God, bring it on," He did. I gave in to it, and it was an amazing experience. And after that, any difficulties I have faced as a new mom, I just remind myself, you did that, you can surely do this!
 

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I just had another thought...my chiropractor has a special plan where she will attend births. I didn't do this, but I'm sure it would have been helpful. Perhaps you could check if your chiropractor will do this, or knows of someone who will. I know it does also depend on where you're giving birth, etc.
 

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My second baby was posterior going into labor, she turned sometime before she came out! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Not sure if this was it, but at one point it felt like she was kicking her way out, I accused my midwife of pulling on her, her reply: "I'm not touching her!!!!" <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
Before she was born, I got pretty worried about the posterior thing, and I did scrub the floor a few times, and avoided reclining at all, and spent a lot of time at the spinning babies site. But I also worried about forcing her to turn. Eventually I decided to just trust that she knew best, and not to force anything. I mean, maybe she's positioning herself that way for a reason, I don't know. Maybe something to do with the cord or the location of the placenta or whatever makes the posterior position the place for her to be. I did a lot of reading and worrying and then just decided to trust my baby and my body and let it go (sort of <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> )<br><br>
Anyway, I really didn't have back labor that I was aware of, and from what I've heard, I would have known! It was a very very intense labor, but not in my back.<br><br>
Peace and best wishes.
 

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After spending my whole pregnancy very consious of how I was sitting/carrying myself, etc. I found out at 10 cm dilated that ds was posterior. I had no back labor to speak of and I had no idea that he was posterior until I had been pushing for hours with no results. After I found out he was posterior, we did some of the spinning babies positioning to get him to move, which worked, and he came out anteriorly after I had been fully dilated for 20 hours.<br><br>
So now I say try to be aware of your baby's position, but don't drive yourself crazy about it, some babies will just be posterior, they probably have a reason for being that way. They still come out!
 

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I'm reading this with interest. My babe is posterior most of the time. Although on occassion he/she twists and has her back on my left side facing my right. I haven't had a chiro adjustment. Mainly for lack of $$, but figure if I make it through Monday I'm going to bite the bullet and try to find a chiro who will fit me in last minute. (I'm 39w2d today.)<br><br>
I've been following all the spinning babies instructions regarding posture and alignment and doing a lot of swimming. Although, I think even spinnning babies pretty much says that some babies just don't turn until contractions and labor cork-screw them around and into place.<br><br>
I had an amazing birth with DD2 and I'm desperately hoping for more of the same. So, I'll admit the idea of hard back labor has me biting my nails.
 
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