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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm sure there have been threads on this topic before, but the search engine wouldn't let me look for soy because it is not a four letter word.<br><br>
I'm in my 5th week and trying to make some pregnancy related modifications to my diet. I have two questions about this?<br><br>
I read somewhere that ingesting too much soy can cause developmental problems with the fetus, but now I can't seem to find any information on it? Can anyone point me to research on the matter? What is your personal experience with soy intake?<br><br>
Which brings me to the second question. How in the world do I eat 100 grams of protein a day. I'm not a vegetarian, but I eat very little meat (fish and chicken only) and don't really want to increase my consumption of that type of protein. What are you all eating? Can you direct me to some resources or previous threads?<br><br>
Thanks for your help. So far I haven't had m/s, but there are times when I just don't feel like eating, so I'm trying to maximize the healthiness of what I'm eating (I say this after ingesting two donuts today - something I haven't eaten in forever <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/confused.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Confused">: )
 

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First of all, you don't need 100g of protein every day. 60 is plenty. (if you're having twins, more is better, but no need to get carried away). And this is easy to get (and to include complete complement of amino acids) even for a very broke vegetarian who doesn't have much to eat besides beans and rice and pancakes with peanut butter...i.e., me some weeks of this pregnancy.<br><br>
Unless you are allergic/sentisitive to soy, I wouldn't worry about soy. You'd have to eat a LOT of it for it to even possibly result in developmental problems, and by that I mean more than any normal person is even going to think about consuming. If you're worried, avoid highly processed meat substitutes like soy hot dogs. I've been eating soy stuff all through my pregnancy (except when I was broke, then not so much), and we're doing fine.<br><br>
Basically, as long as you're eating a basically healthy balanced diet with a variety of foods and no one thing eaten in excess (moderation is the key!), I wouldn't be too worried, most people get PLENTY of protein in their diets already. I'd be more concerned about limiting fish intake than soy (when even the FDA says not to eat more than 12 oz. a day, that tells you something.)
 

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i tried to do a very high protein diet this time around (not sure how much per day, but much more than i normally eat and much more than i ate with dd). my main motivation was that i had pregnancy induced hypertension with dd and protein is supposed to help. my chances of having pih again were slim, so who knows if all the protein helped or not...all i know is that my bp didn't go up at all this time. interestingly enough, i was JUST diagnosed with gestational diabetes last week (i'm 37 weeks). i had passed my 1 hr and wasn't showing any signs. since the gd diet is VERY high in protein, i honestly believe that eating high protein and eating to avoid pih, probably kept the gd under control.<br><br>
we chose to eat more meat to get the protein in. we normally eat a fairly vegetarian diet, with meat only occationally...but lately we've been eating meat daily. we purchased some organic/grass-fed beef and organic pork from a local farmer. other ways i added in protein was by adding chunks of firm tofu to scrambled eggs in the morning (once they are all mixed, its hard to tell the eggs from the tofu and vice versa). i also eat the occational soy protein bar (gen-soy) when i feel like having a treat.<br><br>
the other two major things i did this time was a) LOTS LOTS LOTS of water and pregnancy tea and b) lots of greens and brocolli. collards, kale, chard, etc.
 

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actually the brewer diet (which bradley childbirth classes teach) says 80-100 grams of protein per day. everything, even veggies, has SOME protein in it. so it all adds up.<br>
eggs are an excellent way to boost your protein intake. also things like yogurt and cottage cheese. the yogurt smoothies from yoplait have 10 grams each, so that is a nice way to start the day and smooth out any rough eating times.
 

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here are a couple of links for you. i know there have been threads before, but i didn't search for them either. you could probably do a search here on "brewer" and find lots of stuff, but the brewer diet website is at <a href="http://www.blueribbonbaby.org/" target="_blank">http://www.blueribbonbaby.org/</a> . here's a link i found that shows the protein content of a lot of foods. it's not specifically pregnancy oriented, but i liked the list -- <a href="http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/protein.htm" target="_blank">http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/protein.htm</a> .<br><br>
hth
 

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My midwives were pretty adamant about having 80 grams per day at about 20 weeks. Like mamarsupial said, they felt that lots of protein = less other problems.<br><br>
Anyway, I'm a vegetarian, and I was worried at first, but it was pretty easy. Really, just start reading labels and noting what has more protein than other things.<br><br>
For example, grape nuts has WAY more protein than normal cereal. 1 morningstar farms veggie sausage patty has 10. 1 Cup of oj has 2. A slice of ezekial bread (found in the refrigerator section of natural food stores) has 4. So if for breakfast you have some cereal (can't remember the numbers right now, lets say 4) with soymilk, a sausage patty, a slice of toast and p.b., and oj, you'd have like 20+ grams just for breakfast. I know that is a lot of food, but sometimes that is totally do-able.<br><br>
Anyway, I'd say just read labels, you'd be surprised what has protein and how much!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you everyone for the ideas.<br><br>
I've been planning to boil up some eggs so I have them ready when I'm hungry. I've been limiting eggs for so long (past high cholesterol), that I'm having trouble convincing myself that it is OK to eat more of them right now.<br><br>
I liked all the food ideas and suggestions. Now all I have to do is convince myself to eat. If I have the right things on hand, though, when I do get a hungry moment I will be able to maximize by intake.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/yummy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yummy"><br><br>
mmm eggs...I'm 6 weeks prego and I craved egg salad all day!!
 

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MorningDove, too, remember that in the first trimester many women do not eat the best. Nausea hits, as does fatigue, and that all compounds the issue. Be gentle on yourself about your diet. Eat what you want, try to get as much protein in as you can (I usually recommend 60=80 grams a day of protein) and let go of any guilt or expectations on yourself. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
It all works out in the long run.<br><br>
(Hey! I can practically shout at you down I-5 - you live about 20-25 minutes away from me!)
 
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