Mothering Forum banner

21 - 26 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,740 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>transformed</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9484705"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Thats not true. OB's have hardly any training about breastfeeding at all.<br><br>
They are surgeons, not lactation consultants.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/innocent.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shy"><br><br>
Its like asking a pediatrician for parenting advice. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I understand them not having the experience/training with developing latch and breastfeeding problems, and I'm not asking them to be lactation consultants, but that's BASIC, IMO. They should know that it's ok to breastfeed during pregnancy if they're dispensing the advice. It's part of healthy reproductive science (and EVERY anatomy/physiology text) to know the function and limitations of the breasts, especially during <b>pregnancy</b>, which is their field of specialty!<br><br>
My cousin is training to be an OB/GYN. I'm totally going to ask her what training/advice they receive on all this stuff. It's fascinating. And I'll make sure to tell her if she doesn't get trained on it and doesn't want to do her research, she should keep her mouth shut! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,591 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>smeisnotapirate</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9481493"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">:<br><br>
He's an OB! He's supposed to know what's good/allowed/etc. during pregnancy, and if he's not already educated as to the benefits of something SO BASIC, I can understand the OP feeling uncomfortable.<br><br><b>I don't see it as my job to educate my OB while PAYING him for service.</b> I'll find another OB/MW who gets it and then send the previous one materials and articles. I REFUSE to be the guinea pig for an OB who is judgemental to a patient, AND I refuse to let him charge me for it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
My feelings exactly! And to clarify, the person who really ticked me off in my original post was the endo's assistant who acted all horified "Didn't they tell you to STOP!?!" because I resented the implication from her that I should stop nursing, esp since she has zero training or expertise in that subject (being an endo asst) and i certainly didn't ask her for advice. The endo was just surprised, which doesn't bother me, although I do wish EBF/through pregnncy was more the norm.<br><br>
I just really don't want to have to educate someone, frankly. I think I'm going to go w/ the posters who suggest not to lie, but not to bring it up. Since in my area it seems 6 weeks is the expected time to stop b'feeding and 6 months is some kind of gold standard, I doubt they'll expect me to still be nurisng my 28 mo old, preggo or not!<br><br>
Thanks, mamas, for the good advice adn ideas. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
976 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mclisa</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9473091"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Give the OB a break. OK, so he has an opinion about breastfeeding. Technically, OB's aren't experts in breastfeeding. He was probably just expressing his own opinion. If your eye doctor told you this, would you care? It wouldn't mean that you wouldn't want him to be your eye doctor.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
You're right. An OB shouldn't necessairly be an expert in breastfeeding, but they should be an expert in what is safe for pregnancy, which in most cases nursing is not a health issue for either the mother or the baby.<br><br>
My OB asked me when I weaned DD, and only raised an eyebrow when I said I hadn't, but unless she was putting me on pelvic rest or there was something I hadn't been made aware of, I planned on continuing. I was a little more than irritated at that point anyway because shortly before she asked me when I wanted to schedule a repeat c/s. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: She went on to warn me about pain about mid way through the pregnancy and to be aware of the potential for contractions. The office staff calls me The Breastfeeding Lady <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> , so I have a bit of a reputation... And as the pregnancy has gone on, my OB has been telling me about different cases of tandem nursers she's either heard of or come across, and was very interested in a book I suggested about birth interventions and breastfeeding outcomes.<br><br>
In any case, I wouldn't hesitate to tell any doctor that you are nursing while pregnant. Just be prepared to hand them copies of studies the next time you go in if they give you some backward, uneducated answer.<br><br>
Anna
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>smeisnotapirate</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9481493"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">:<br><br>
He's an OB! He's supposed to know what's good/allowed/etc. during pregnancy, and if he's not already educated as to the benefits of something SO BASIC, I can understand the OP feeling uncomfortable.<br><br>
I don't see it as my job to educate my OB while PAYING him for service. I'll find another OB/MW who gets it and then send the previous one materials and articles. I REFUSE to be the guinea pig for an OB who is judgemental to a patient, AND I refuse to let him charge me for it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
...that it is not my job to educate the ob. And if they have a personal opinion, they should keep it to themselves. You need a professional opinion backed by experience. If a doc thinks that pregnancy and breastfeeding don't mix, they obviously don't know what they are talking about and you should seek out someone else. I agree that it is a non issue and doesn't even have to come up, but I also don't think you should feel like you have to keep it to yourself. I want to mesh with my docs as much as possible. I know it is can be a major pain to shop around for the best doc, but it will be the best thing in the long run. You want to save yourself from being in the hands of incompetence in the most crucial and vulnerable times. For me, a doc being ignorant of this basic issue sends up a huge red flag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
976 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>athensmama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9493725"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">...that it is not my job to educate the ob. And if they have a personal opinion, they should keep it to themselves. You need a professional opinion backed by experience. If a doc thinks that pregnancy and breastfeeding don't mix, they obviously don't know what they are talking about and you should seek out someone else. I agree that it is a non issue and doesn't even have to come up, but I also don't think you should feel like you have to keep it to yourself. I want to mesh with my docs as much as possible. I know it is can be a major pain to shop around for the best doc, but it will be the best thing in the long run. You want to save yourself from being in the hands of incompetence in the most crucial and vulnerable times. For me, a doc being ignorant of this basic issue sends up a huge red flag.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
The problem is that they may be giving their professional opinion based on outdated information. Face it, breastfeeding is not a big thing in this country, so it gets glossed over by many medical professionals even when new research comes out. By not giving them up to date information, you may be doing yourself and your community a disservice by allowing another "respected" medical professional to go on in their ignorance. By bringing it up in the way of, "Oh, really. I just saw a peer reviewed study on that, and I'd be happy to bring it in for you" shows you are informed and not just some nutball that read something online and think you're the expert. Most docs are pretty open minded when it comes to accepting peer reviewed materials. If not, then run. It also keeps the same doc from giving out bogus advise to the next woman that comes along who may not be as proactive and educated as yourself. In all other areas, that doc may be a perfect fit for you. While being knowledgeable about about some aspects of breastfeeding is important, it's not the be all, end all of having good prenatal care. This is how I address issues with my OB that we butt heads about. I can understand her viewpoint about some things, but she also knows I do my homework when it comes to the things I'm adamant about and is willing to work with me.<br><br>
Anna
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,792 Posts
I educated. I never caught flak from my own doctor, but I caught plenty from my grandmother, the retired nurse, and random other people. I always acted confident and answered with a big smile, "OF COURSE I'm still nursing dd! Can you imagine how she would feel if I took this away right when she's going through a huge transition? And I love the immunological benefits -- she and her baby sib will be able to protect each other through the immunities created by my milk in response to their germs. That's just awesome."
 
21 - 26 of 26 Posts
Top