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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just found out for sure that I am pregnant today.
Anyway, my 22 mo. ds was born at 36 weeks and has had few health problems. I dream this time around of a full term baby. I complained of pressure and braxton hicks contractions and I was told it was normal at 33 weeks. Then I had dizzy spells and was also told it was normal. The OB was also ready to do an episotomy on me after only 20 min. of pushing. A few of my other friends love this OB and have switched from their midwives to her. She also had deliveries at the nicest hospital here. Her office and staff are nice and convenient.

If you were me, would you switch to a high risk dr., I think called a perinatologist or just to someone else or stick it out with who I have and make it more clear about the kind of care I want.
 

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Do you have reason to believe that this pg will be high-risk? Here, you have to be referred to a perinatologist by your OB or MW and they only treat moms with high-risk conditions. The OB you're describing doesn't sound like she's really on the ball, but ultimately, you should see whomever you are most comfortable with- unless you are indeed high-risk, then IMO you should definately be under the care of a perinat.
 

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Well 36 weeks is pretty close to fully cooked, not premature.
Did you have any other probelms during that pregnancy like preterm labor or anything?

If so, then I think I'd switch to a midwife BUT see a perinatologist every month of so for a transvaginal sonogram (don't worry, not a sono of the baby at all) to check for cervical change.

But if not, and you just delivered at 36 weeks and had no other problems during the pregnancy, then I'd take Alfalfa and Vitamin C starting at 28 weeks (prevents premature rupture of membranes) and leave it at that since there is no reason to think this pregnancy would be high risk.
 

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I'm a nurse at a birth center, who has also had to 36 weekers (after weeks upon weeks on bedrest) and I can say that based on the history you provided, you have no reason to go to a high risk OB *or* a perinatologist. We routinely see women with your history at our birth center. Even with preterm labor, we usually manage that, and our doc has privileges at the local hospitals. So unless the baby actually comes early, we don't call in outside assistance.

Check with the mw to see what sort of back up plan she has in the event you have preterm labor. But just because you had a 36 weeker is no reason to assume you will need a high risk OB.

Enjoy your pregnancy!!!

Lori
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks! That makes me feel better. Do you know the rate of people that have 36 weekers that have full term babies after? I know I was close, but having a small baby has a lot of challenges. I worry more than most people, since both of my sisters have to do IVF just to get pregnant, and we just found out (after a loss at 21 weeks) that one sister has incompetent cervix. I may switch to a mw though since I'll get people that will get to know me and listen when I'm having complications. Thanks!
 

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I would interview a few midwives and find one that is a good fit for you. If you need any care she can't provide, she'll refer you. I felt very safe with my midwives - more so than I would have with a doc - because they really took the time to get to know me, to listen to my gut feelings and opinions and ideas and concerns. Talk to her; tell her about your history and your sister with incompetent cervix and your worries about getting to full term.

I know everyone wants to get to 39 or 40 weeks but I remember my midwife wanting everything ready at 36 weeks (we had a homebirth with #3) as you really can go at any point after that. Sometimes due dates are off and we are further along than we think we are.

Congrats on your pregnancy!!!!
 

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Sweetred, I understand where you're coming from. I should have said this earlier, but my twins were born 2 months early, and came home from the hospital equivalent to 35 weeks. I definitely hear you re: 36 weekers NOT being ready to come out yet.... yes, 36 weekers are sleepy, teeny, spit-uppy, hard to rouse to feed, not great nursers, etc. Boy what a difference as my twins neared their orginal due date!

I think if you had any complications in your last pregnancy like preterm labor you might want to get a baseline cervical sono at around 14 weeks and then another around 20 weeks, maybe one a month after until you're past 32 weeks. That way you can see if there is any cervical change that warrants action (e.g., bedrest, medication).

But as others have said, if the only thing that happened was you went into labor and had your baby at 36 weeks last time, then that doesn't make you a high risk pregnancy this time.
Besides, an incompetent cervix would cause problems long before week 36 (or even week 26 for most).

Remember what I posted earlier about Alfalfa and Vitamin C taken daily after week 28 (after you get your 28 week hematocrit bloodwork done, b/c Alfalfa can throw off that result) to prevent premature rupture of membranes (PROM). Both my midwife and my labor doula recommended that to me.
 

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Just wanted to second the midwife idea. Find one you like and are comfortable with, and she will be your best bet for comprehensive, meaningful prenatal care.

If you're craving some more ideas about preventing early contractions/labor, check out Every Pregnant Woman's Guide to Preventing Premature Birth, by Barbara Luke ScD, MPH, RN, RD I'd suggest getting it from a library, though- there are some chapters that are a little redundant- we all know that smoking and drinking alcohol are bad for baby!

Good luck!
 
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