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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do you use and why? I am using some that I get from our food co op right now. Rainbow something or other. I like them but I just read on the bottle you're supposed to take 6 everyday! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/yikes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="EEK!"> I don't think I can manage that!
 

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I'm taking 1 tbsp cod liver oil, 3 packets of Alacer Emergen-C for kids, and following the SPUN diet that I found in an old book written by Gail Sforza Brewer. I take the cod liver oil because there is no way I could possibly be getting enough vitamin D, plus it has tons of EFA's that are good for the placenta & uterine/cervical/vaginal tissues. The Emergen-C is full of all the vitamins I need, is easy to take because it's a strawberry drink that you mix with water, and doesn't have any artificial colors or flavors. I'll probably start taking the Rainbow Light Prenatal powder at some point - probably when I run out of emergen-C. It tasted gross to me, though, so we'll see.<br><br>
The SPUN diet is based on Dr. Tom Brewer's findings in using diet to prevent toxemia & other pregnancy-related difficulties. It is also a bit more detailed that the Blue Ribbon Baby diet that is found at <a href="http://www.blueribbonbaby.org" target="_blank">www.blueribbonbaby.org</a>
 

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YOu can get the rainbow lite just once prenatals.<br><br>
they are one a day.<br><br>
Let me know if you need a bottle, amy. Pm me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
How come you take the Emergen-C for kids? I have a ton of the adult stuff. Can I take that or is it too strong? Thanks!
 

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I take the Rainbow Light one a days and a B6 (because it really helped with my m/s and I'm afraid to stop taking it.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">) and Fish Oil and Evening Primrose oil.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I just started a b vitamin today in anticipation of m/s. It's got b6/b12 in it. Can you take evening primrose early on? I thought that was later. Thanks everyone! You'd think I've never done this before! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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i take shaklee's and order them over the internet. not prenates but have everything you need, including iron and folic acid. two a day and they are SO easy on my tummy!
 

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I take the Rainbow Light Prenatal 6 a Day + 38mg iron capsule<br><br>
I fear taking the once a days, thinking that they are more compacted and not nearly so well-absorbed by my body.<br><br>
I take either three at breakfast and three at dinner or two with each major meal. Just be sure not to take your vitamins within 20 minutes of any dairy, as it seriously inhibits your iron absorption.
 

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I take rainbow light once a days, plus some calcium (3 a day <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: ) and iron.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">How come you take the Emergen-C for kids? I have a ton of the adult stuff. Can I take that or is it too strong? Thanks!</td>
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No, it's not too strong. It's just that the Kids stuff has many many more vitamins in it.<br>
I was reading Feed Your Kids Right by Dr. Lendon Smith this morning, though, and I don't think my vitamin intake is as good as it should be. I'll probably step up the CLO to 2 tbsp, and add a B complex at the very least.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hmm, I'll have to order some of the kid's stuff from my food co op next time. What is the CLO for? This is great info!
 

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The cod liver oil is for vitamins A&D, with essential fatty acids. Dr. Weston Price found that in ALL the isolated cultures he studied, they either relied on seafood or dairy for a great portion of their diet. Those that ate a lot of fish & seafood made sure that the pregnant women got the fish livers, because they KNEW it was important for making perfect babies. If I could, I'd go to the fish market & get fish livers.....but I don't trust that they'd be healthy, especially if coming from the great lakes. The CLO you can buy is usually from Norway, which is supposed to be very unpolluted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Where do you buy your CLO from? Thanks! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I think it's Twinlab? I order it thru food co-op (does yours order from Blooming Prairie/UNFI?), and get it in the liquid form. You can get it in capsules, too, if you can't stand to swallow the oil. It just tastes mildly fishy. They have a cherry flavored cod liver oil, too <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue">uke Trust me, it's awful!
 

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I think you want to watch out for fish liver oils though because they contain too much Vitamin A, which can cause birth defects. My midwife just gave me an article from a recent Midwifery Today that recommends 4000 mg of fish and evening primrose oil daily in pregnancy. I was wondering about taking evening primrose early in pregnancy too, but says that "EPO [evening primrose oil] can help ripen the cervix when consumed throughout the pregnancy, but does not induce labor." The article is really interesting and I'd be happy to mail you a copy if you'd like.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I was taking the Rainbow light 6 a day, but my naturopath/midwife has switched me over to New Chapter. You only have to take 4 a day, so that's cool. I haven't noticed a difference. I also take 2 tblspns of flax seed oil a day (lots of omegas, supposed to be good at preventing neural tube defects) and just started a protein shake made from egg whites. I always drank a soy based one before, but supposedly egg based is better for my blood type.
 

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Here's an article on Vitamin A<br><a href="http://www.westonaprice.org/nutrition_guidelines/vitaminasaga.html" target="_blank">http://www.westonaprice.org/nutritio...aminasaga.html</a>
 

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Do not take Evening primrose oil early on.It is a uterine contractor.I take Nordic Naturals Omega complex and it is lemon flavored so you can't taste the fish oil.
 

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Quoting from the above article:<br><br>
"Even worse than vitamin-A vagary is vitamin-A knavery in the form of concerns that vitamin A may be toxic in more than the minuscule RDA-recommended amounts. In fact, so great is the propaganda against the vitamin that obstetricians and pediatricians are now warning patients to avoid foods containing vitamin A!<br><br>
Recently an "expert" panel recommended lowering the RDA (recommended daily allowance) for vitamin A from 5000 IU daily to about 2500 IU and has set an upper limit of about 10,000 IUs for women. The panel was headed by Dr. Robert Russell of Tufts University, who warned that intake over the "upper limit" may cause irreversible liver damage and birth defects—a ridiculous statement in view of the fact that just a few decades ago pregnant women were routinely advised to take cod liver oil daily and eat liver several times per week. One tablespoon of cod liver oil contains at least 15,000 IU and one serving of liver can contain up to 40,000 IU vitamin A. Russell epitomizes the establishment view when he insists that vitamin-A requirements can be met with one-half cup of carrots daily.<br><br>
The anti-vitamin-A campaign began in 1995 with the publication of a Boston University School of Medicine study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.15 "Teratogenicity of High Vitamin A Intake," by Kenneth J. Rothman and his colleagues, correlates vitamin-A consumption among more than 22,000 pregnant women with birth defects occurring in subsequent offspring. The study received extensive press coverage in the same publications that had earlier extolled the benefits of vitamin A. "Study Links Excess Vitamin A and Birth Defects" by Jane Brody appeared on the front page of the New York Times on October 7, 1995; on November 24, 1995, the Washington Times reported: "High doses of vitamin A linked to babies' brain defects."<br><br>
When a single study receives front-page coverage, it's important to take a closer look, especially as earlier research discovered the importance of vitamin A in preventing birth defects. In fact, the defects listed as increasing with increased vitamin A dosage—cleft lip, cleft palate, hydrocephalus and major heart malformations—are also defects of vitamin A deficiency.<br><br>
In the study, researchers asked over 22,000 women to respond to questionnaires about their eating habits and supplement intake before and during pregnancy. Their responses were used to determine vitamin-A status. As reported in the newspapers, researchers found that cranial-neural-crest defects increased with increased dosages of vitamin A; what the papers did not report was the fact that neural tube defects decreased with increased vitamin A consumption, and that no trend was apparent with musculoskeletal, urogenital or other defects. The trend was much less pronounced, and less statistically significant, when cranial-neural-crest defects were correlated with vitamin-A consumption from food alone.<br><br>
The study is compromised by a number of flaws. Vitamin-A status was assessed by the inaccurate method of recall and questionnaires; and no blood tests were taken to determine the actual usable vitamin-A status of the mothers. Researchers did not weight birth defects according to severity; thus we do not know whether the defects of babies born to mothers taking high doses of vitamin A were serious or minor compared to those of mothers taking lower amounts.<br><br>
The most serious flaw was that researchers failed to distinguish between manufactured vitamin A in the form of retinol, found in supplements and added to fabricated foods, from natural vitamin-A complex, present with numerous co-factors, from vitamin-A-containing foods. It is well known that synthetic vitamins are less biologically active, hence less effective, than naturally occurring vitamins. This is especially true of the fat-soluble vitamins like vitamin A, because these tend to be more complex molecules, with numerous double bonds and a multiplicity of forms. Natural vitamin A occurs as a mixture of various isomers, aldehydes, esters, acids and alcohols. Pure retinoic acid, a metabolite of vitamin A used to treat adult acne, is well known to cause birth defects. Apparently pure retinol has teratogenic properties in high amounts as well.<br><br>
Researchers found that cranial-neural-crest defects increased in proportion to the amount of retinol from supplements consumed during the first trimester of pregnancy (although the total number of defects remained stable up to 15,000 IU daily). Research into vitamin A has indicated that many factors interfere with its absorption and utilization. Inadequate fat in the diet, poor production of bile salts, low enzyme status, and compromised liver function can all interfere with the uptake and usage of vitamin A, especially when given as a supplement in the form of retinol, rather than as a component of whole foods. It may be that the teratogenic effects of commercial vitamin-A preparations are exacerbated in women whose dietary practices and general health status are poor. Some researchers believe that synthetic vitamin A interferes with the proper utilization of natural vitamin A from foods.<br><br>
Pure retinol is added to many fabricated foods like margarine, breakfast cereals and pizza. The study made no distinction between those women whose vitamin A was supplied by whole animal foods and those who ingested retinol added to margarine, white flour and extruded breakfast cereals—foods which contain many other factors that can cause birth defects. Natural vitamin A provided by liver, eggs, butter, cream and cod liver oil is well recognized as providing excellent protection against birth defects.<br><br>
Distinctions between synthetic and natural vitamin A have been absent in the extensive media coverage of this study—on the contrary, the newspaper reports contain implied warnings against pregnant women eating liver, dairy products, meat and eggs, but none against eating fabricated foods like margarine and breakfast cereals to which synthetic vitamin A is added. And there has been no media coverage for subsequent studies, which found that high levels of vitamin A did not increase the risk of birth defects. A study carried out in Rome, Italy found no congenital malformations among 120 infants exposed to more than 50,000 IU of vitamin A per day.16 A study from Switzerland looked at blood levels of vitamin A in pregnant women and found that a dose of 30,000 IU per day resulted in blood levels that had no association with birth defects.17 "
 

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Well I am certainly (and obviously <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">) no expert on vitamins. I'm not recommending people avoid foods with Vitamin A in them, just that they not supplement their diets with additional Vitamin A. And my recommendations come from my midwife and an article in "Midwifery Today" that she printed for me.<br><br>
I have nothing against Vitamin A, I was just advised to get my EFA's elsewhere.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 
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