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Ds just turned 3 and I am thinking of sending him to preschool for half a day starting in the fall. This is due to a variety of factors that I have thought out for quite some time now. The thing is, we are pretty low income, and I hope to use the time he is in school to get a job and make some extra money. However, if it just pays for sending him to school it might not be worth it. Also, most "preschools" I've looked into are day care centers and that is not what I want at all for him. Are there any public preschools that are run through the school system? Are there any low income programs out there for preschool? Any info would be great, thanks. Oh, and we live in St. Paul, MN <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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Headstart is one that is free and is aimed more at low income families. They are mostly for at-risk and low income families and then leave a certain % open for special needs as well. Its state run and funded. Our son went to headstart and loved it.<br><br>
Many schools also have a school readiness, but usually for pre-kindergarten, not preschool. (for 4 year olds). There is also ECFE through the schools but that is usually parental involvement as well, not a drop-off type pre-k.<br><br>
I was a preschool teacher for several years in the cities, in a childcare setting. Most childcares have options for part time or just for the curriculum part of the day. Generally 2-3 hours a day in the mornings. During that structured time, a <i>good</i> daycare center isn't going to be much (if at all) different than a preschool center. They are actually regulated the same in MN, the teachers are supposed to have the same training and classroom ratios. So I'd look at local daycare centers and ask specifically about the preschool programs and what the structure is. Not all daycares do the preschool structure, which is why you have to ask. I've been in several different settings in the cities and have seen both types. One of the best preschool settings I have taught in was at a daycare center.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Kristine233</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11578304"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I was a preschool teacher for several years in the cities, in a childcare setting. Most childcares have options for part time or just for the curriculum part of the day. Generally 2-3 hours a day in the mornings. During that structured time, a <i>good</i> daycare center isn't going to be much (if at all) different than a preschool center. They are actually regulated the same in MN, the teachers are supposed to have the same training and classroom ratios. So I'd look at local daycare centers and ask specifically about the preschool programs and what the structure is. Not all daycares do the preschool structure, which is why you have to ask. I've been in several different settings in the cities and have seen both types. One of the best preschool settings I have taught in was at a daycare center.</div>
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Okay, you've convinced me. Do you have any suggestions for some good ones? For daycare centers, do the kids have to be potty trained at 3?<br><br>
Thanks.
 
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