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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in an area where there are 2 or 3 other (what I consider to be) quality childbirth classes going on. We have Bradley, Hypnobirthing and Birthing from Within classes offered around here. Each of these classes is offered independently of the hospitals and costs between $275 and $325.<br><br>
I am newly certified through ALACE to teach and really want my classes to be available to EVERYONE! I feel like it is important enough information that all birthing women who want it should have it. The cost of other classes in the area make them cost prohibitive for many (at a time in life where $$ seems to fly out the window).<br><br>
I am hoping to offer my classes for less than the others in the area, but not so much less that I seem to be offering inferior material. How low can I go and still keep up with the reputation of the others?
 

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I am a Bradley teacher (not in your area). We all talk and charge a comparable amount so as not to compete. Keep that in mind too with wanting to keep good relationships with other CBEs in your area.<br><br>
I have NEVER turned anyone away for lack of an ability to pay. Always willing to work something out but people tend to place a higher value on something that they invested in and will more likely take it seriously.<br><br>
Something to consider....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That is a great point! I already have a decent relationship with the other CBEs in the area and would hate to make them feel like I was trying to steal all their clients. I just know how it strapped us financially to get into a class and feel guilty that my pricing could cause financial worry in a family (or that someone would forgo classes for that reason).<br><br>
I guess I could put a disclaimer on my site to call if you can't swing the cost... How do you word that so it doesn't offend *or* allow everyone to take advantage of me?
 

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"Discounts available for those in need."<br><br>
How about that? Then they could ask about the discount, you could feel out what they can afford, see if paying a little every week would help... whatever you want to do.<br><br>
I agree that you should never price yourself so low as to compete unfairly with others in the same field. You don't want to be the Walmart of childbirth education.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>momileigh</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9943135"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I agree that you should never price yourself so low as to compete unfairly with others in the same field. You don't want to be the Walmart of childbirth education.</div>
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I like this quote, but I have problems working that in my area (I will be certified through ALACE soon). Here is my situation. I live in a large city. Hospital classes (there are 5-8 major hospitals) run $50-$70 a series. I know of some Bradley classes that run $250+. I know of an ALACE class that is around $150. When I was pregnant with #1, dh and I did not want to pay $140 for the classes that a nurse with our birthing center was having. We were already paying thousands for the birth itself and did not want to shell out anymore. I read lots of books and studied birth on the internet instead. I agree that the teacher should be able to get paid what she deserves, but our city is not the most natural birth focused and I feel that motivated clients are far and few between. I want to charge enough to show the validity of the education, but don't want it to be too high that people balk at the price. Anyway, those are my rambling thoughts.
 

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It would be nice if the bradley classes cost less than theydo. I think we paid $250. But after DS was born I investigated becomeing a bradley instructor and realized it was too expensive for me to buy a certification. That really stunk because I had a great experience, and I thought being an instructor I could share the joy. But it did show me why the classes usually run so high.<br>
Maybe all you instructors can tell the people in charge it should cost less to join up? I'd still love to do it.
 

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When you consider that Bradley classes are 12 weeks, and my own classes run 2.5 hours per week, plus I offer my students intensive out-of-class support (review their birth plans, answer all their questions week-to-week even after classes end, call me in labor for ideas/suggestions, arrange and attend a reunion, etc. etc. etc.), it's certainly understandable that they cost a bit more. I'm sure the cost/hour is comparable to other classes. I'm certainly not making much money at all, for all the time that goes into my students (a labor of love!).<br><br>
For my classes, I list the price and then state that "scholarships are available." I usually have one couple in each series who's receiving a "scholarship" (really just a discount) of some kind.
 

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I don't like the word discount. It does sound walmart-ish. What about offering a sliding scale. State what you charge for your class (say $200) but that you work on a sliding scale and will accept anything between $100 and $200 for families in need. You can include a "no questions asked" statement if you want to remove the need to "apply for help" if you feel women in need would find that option itself to be a barrier to accessing your classes. Its challenging, because it works on an honor system, but it would let all women feel comfortable taking your class and paying what they could, within those amounts....<br><br>
Good luck!<br><br>
Sarahfina
 

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Does discount really sound walmartish? I think it's just honest. "Scholarship" and "sliding scale" imply more of an official process. (I remember that we couldn't use the word "scholarship" unless we implemented official rules as to who would "win" the scholarship and actually had funding back when I was involved w/ a doula group. And "sliding scale" indicates a need to disclose exact household income and apply it to an actual sliding scale.) Discounts are at the discount-giver's complete discretion.<br><br>
Now, if she was advertising her classes as having "Everyday low prices," THAT would sound Walmartish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Now, if she was advertising her classes as having "Everyday low prices," THAT would sound Walmartish.</td>
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AW MAN!! Now I have to change my slogan! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
Seriously, thanks for all the food for thought. I'm sure I'll set a fair price soon... now to talk it all over with my accountant! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 
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