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<p>Well.</p>
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<p>We're doing k12 for school, and dd1 is in first grade.  She finished the K math way ahead and we dived into the first grade math; k12 changed their math curriculum over the summer, so we switched to the new one and essentially I've had math on the back burner - we'll go through a bunch of worksheets from the new curriculum and knock out a bunch of the math lessons all at once periodically, we're pretty much 'on target' for first grade math in their curriculum - which is adding/subtracting to 50 and counting beyond 100 .... grouping to count to 100.  No multiplication or division.  I've basically been trying to knock out all the stuff we'd already done in the other curriculum before settling into doing math daily, and not thinking about math a lot other than that. </p>
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<p>We've been talking about multiplication/division outside of school work, mostly - grouping - "If I have 12 cookies and three friends to split them between, how many does each friend get?" sorts of number games.  This has not been in any way directed or organized or focused - essentially an unschooled approach to this since it wasn't something we were really covering right now.  She probably initiates it as much or more than I do. </p>
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<p>Tonight at bedtime, dd1 asked me how to count to 100 using only three numbers.  I told her it was impossible, because 100 isn't divisible by three, and explained that you'd count 33, 66, then 99, and have one left over. But that we can count by 4 divisions (25, 50, etc.) or 5 divisions (20, 40, 60, etc.), etc.  Just not by three divisions.</p>
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<p>So then she looks at me and says, "Three isn't divisible, either, and neither is 5."  I explained that, yes, she's right, they are prime numbers which means that they are only divisible by themselves and 1.  She says, "And, so are 7, 11, and 13." </p>
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<p>:jaw</p>
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<p>So ---- I think I probably ought to move a little more quickly through this first grade math --- and, does anyone have any good lesson plans/resources for prime numbers for little kids?  I found this lesson plan, geared for a fifth graders but I think it would work for Ina:</p>
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<p><a href="http://www.education.com/activity/article/Prime_Number_Hunter_fifth/" target="_blank">http://www.education.com/activity/article/Prime_Number_Hunter_fifth/</a></p>
 

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<p>Yes, that's Erastosthones' seive, and I think it's entirely suitable to younger children. We always did it as part of the Miquon program (where it's considered 2nd grade level, though my kids were younger). </p>
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<p>There's a fun story exploring prime numbers in "Penrose the Mathematical Cat" by Theoni Pappas. I highly recommend her books.</p>
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<p>Miranda</p>
 

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Discussion Starter #3
<p>Thanks for the book recommendation!  :)</p>
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<p>I developed a math block when I was in elementary and never really overcame it - I remember loving math when I was little, and then struggling to memorize the multiplication tables.  Lots of family crisis at the same time and it ended up with a block for me .... so I'm feeling a bit overwhelmed by Ina's instinctive grasp of math concepts!  I guess she'll be teaching me while we go through some of this, eh?  I'm proficient - I just struggle and don't like it.  I do like the playful patterns though ....</p>
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<p>I've a cousin who works in math education at the college level - she recommended</p>
<p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FKnowing-Teaching-Elementary-Mathematics-Understanding%2Fdp%2F0415873843%2Fref%3Dsr_1_1%3Fie%3DUTF8%26qid%3D1289848106%26sr%3D8-1" rel="norewrite" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/Knowing-Teaching-Elementary-Mathematics-Understanding/dp/0415873843/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1289848106&sr=8-1</a></p>
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<p>and</p>
<p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FHeres-Looking-Euclid-Surprising-Astonishing%2Fdp%2F1416588256%2Fref%3Dsr_1_1%3Fie%3DUTF8%26qid%3D1289848145%26sr%3D8-1" rel="norewrite" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/Heres-Looking-Euclid-Surprising-Astonishing/dp/1416588256/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1289848145&sr=8-1</a> (this second sounds more like a 'recreational math' book and less of theory/application - I'm not sure whether it would be helpful or not). </p>
 
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