Mothering Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just read in another thread that her OB was comfortable with PROM as long as mom and baby were healthy. My question is why do most OB's want a woman delivered within 24 hours or they are threatening her with a C-sec?<br><br>
I ask because I had a small leak with DD#1 and I was in labor but I was progressing very slow and the contractions were quite mild but regular. My OB sent me to the hospital after my morning appointment and started the evil pitocin almost immediately.<br><br>
If only I knew then what I know now, I would never have consented to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,613 Posts
I'm not exactly sure of the context of the other thread, but sometimes, PROM (or any rupture of the membranes) doesn't necessarily release much more fluid than what was accumulated in front of the baby's head, behind the cervix- the forewaters. If PROM happens, and it's a tiny gush, and the baby's head in a sense corks it back up, there's a chance that the sac may re-seal.<br><br>
Also, some OB's might be a little more boned up on research that consistently shows that the vagina's not a sponge, and doesn't "soak up" anything. I would guess that an OB who would be fairly comfortable with a PROM without any immediate interventions would just probably ask mom to pay attention to the baby's movements, and occasionally (throughout the next days, here and there) check for heart tones.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">If only I knew then what I know now, I would never have consented to it.</td>
</tr></table></div>
<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"> I know so many women who feel this way- myself included.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,348 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mikayla's mama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8000745"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My question is why do most OB's want a woman delivered within 24 hours or they are threatening her with a C-sec?</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
It could put baby at greater risk of infection. I know it's a risk if mom is GBS+.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,428 Posts
GBS+ aside, the risk of infection is small if all things (including doctors' fingers) are kept out of the vagina. I too ended up w/ pit after 24 hours of slow leaking. I DID know enough to refuse it, but ws exhausted and they finally wore me down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,646 Posts
For PROM, the recommendation is to keep everything out of the vagina. This includes no baths. Some even say to use a peri bottle to squirt plain water on the outside after using the toilet, to try to keep that whole area as clean as possible. The risk of infection goes up over time, but it still isn't enough, in my opinion, to take extreme measure so soon (like 24 hours).<br><br>
Doctors (and legislators) seem to have a very different way of weighing risks than a regular person.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">If only I knew then what I know now, I would never have consented to it.</td>
</tr></table></div>
I know so many women who feel this way- myself included.</td>
</tr></table></div>
I can only thank God I found this place before conceiving my first.<br><br>
Thanks to all MDC members for contributing to making it such an enlightening place!<br><br>
(Every single one of you is being thanked! No exceptions! I expect a "you're welcome" from each and every one of you as confirmation that you realize you are wonderful.)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,038 Posts
It may have been my OBs mentioned in that other thread...<br><br>
I'm seeing a husband-wife OB team for my VBAC and the husband half actually did his research study/residency project on PROM. His feeling as a result of his research is that as long as the mama and babe are both okay, there is no reason to induce/deliver simply because of PROM. The longest he has attended a mama with PROM was 11 weeks...and both she and the babe were totally fine.<br><br>
I had PROM with my first so it's something I asked about specifically when choosing care givers...<br><br>
Anyway, the big concern with PROM is infection for the mother or babe and distress for the babe caused by cord prolapse or other positioning problem. My care providers want to know if your water breaks, and they want you to go to the hospital for monitoring after 24 hours (if no contractions). They don't induce or anything like that, but they want to have twice daily blood draws from mama and they want to check the babe's status every few hours.<br><br>
That way they can catch any infection or distress early on and can discuss options (like induction, or antibiotics, or amnio infusion, or whatever). Actually, at my last appointment they mentioned that another one of their VBAC mamas was in the hospital with PROM (her water broke about a month early) and other than monitoring her they were just waiting for nature to "catch up". Apparently the mama was having a pretty good time...her three year old would spend the day with her in her room, but basically she was enjoying a "mini vacation" before her next babe arrived. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Anyway, outside of infection and distress, there's no good reason to induce/deliver just because your water breaks. It's just that many doctors and birth facilities don't want to "risk" waiting and decide to rush the whole thing just because there "could" be a problem in the future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,648 Posts
When I PROM'ed with #2 we just waited. I stopped the tocolytics (I was 33 wks 5 days) and started laboring the next day. She was born about 30 hrs later. My doctor didn't even discuss inducing. I was infected by the time she was born - which is what we think caused the PROM in the first place.<br><br>
With #3 I PROM'ed at 33 wks 3 days and they did a c/s. She was transverse (head over one hip, back over the other, spine over the cervix) and not engaged at all. I had very little fluid. I was actually very surprised. With #2 I'd had a gush and then little trickles. Since Abby's head did not engage and stop the flow I just kept gushing. They sectioned me because of the risk of cord prolapse with no engagedpresenting part. They also thought she was farther along. They were dating based on my one 2 day "period" I'd had since Anna was born. But based on several sonos she was 3 wks behind. They had also said she was almost 7 lb. They pulled her out and she was 4 lb 15 oz and very immature. NICU said the dating on the sonos was accurate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,648 Posts
Also important to know is that PROM can mean two things, <i>prolonged</i> rupture of membranes (>24 hrs before delivery) and <i>preterm</i> rupture of memberanes (< 37 weeks). And you can actually have PPROM.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top