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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, I'm still working on teaching my little 14 lb dog not to jump on people. I've been snapping the leash on her before I open the door, and stepping on the leash until she calms down, and then praising her and petting her. She's fine on the leash, I pretty much don't need to step on it anymore to keep her down. But as soon as she is off the leash, she is jumping all over whoever it is, and it's driving me beserk.

Would switching her to a prong collar help so I can give her a correction when she jumps? I've been afraid to use one because she is so small and jumps so high, and since I don't know what I'm doing I'm afraid I'll seriously hurt her when I jerk the leash.
 

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If she's fine on lead but not off the prong isn't going to make a difference--it still needs to be attached to a lead.
Here's what I want you to do. Go buy some fairly soft cotton rope, put a leash clip on the end. Start with the rope being 3' long.
Once a week I want you to cut 6" off the lead, eventually, the lead will be too short to do much with...but the dog will still think it's "active" (but it will provide you with a tab to grab if she DOES need correcting)

#5 rule of dog training. You can't train a dog off lead, off lead is something you do once she's PERFECT, if you take the leash off and she reverts...she's not perfect yet. Ask yourself the same question your dog will ask...if I give her a command and she says "Not now I'm busy", what will you do about it?
 

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No size dogs should wear them! And you should never jerk a leash! You could serioulsy harm your dog.

Have you considered obedience classes? A good program will help enormously. You'd be surprised at how incredibly a good class will change your life!

In the meanwhile, hold your dog, or crate the pup when you have to answer the door.
 

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What are you basing this opinion on???
Secondly....NEVER, EVER, hold your dog at the door especially with the problems the OP describes---that is in itself a recipe for canine behavior problems.
 

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I assume you are asking me. I agree she shouldn't hold the dog as it's not trained. Although I don't get where NEVER EVER comes in, since people hold pups *all the time**. But

I thought it was better than jerking the dog and --maybe seriously injuring-- it until she can talk to a good trainer. A 14 lb dog is not a big dog and can be easlu hurt. Not to mention that a prong collar is seen as abuse by many trainers. But obvioulsy not by all. I think it's totally inhumane. I have two dogs that are very well loved and trained, and we've never had to jerk them or use a prong on them. That's just *wrong*.

I don't think she should torture the dog at all at the door right now. A 14 lb dog is small and she should be containing it rather than letting it jump everywhere, or yanking it by it's neck.
 

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Here is some info on the prong collar. It's a last resort method, and can make an aggressive dog more so.http://www.thepetprofessor.com/artic...cle.aspx?id=85

In the meanwhile, crate your dog when the doorbell rings, or put her in another safe area. Don't make it a punishment, however. Just realize the dog is too excited at this point to handle it. Think of your doggies as a toddler new to the world. And call a trainer.
 

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But why?? Have you ever educated yourself on training collars in general?? Do you have ANYTHING to back up the statement that it's wrong and torture??

Never Ever comes in because I will say that in a good 80% of the clients I consult with regarding aggresion and jumping issues with small dogs hold their dogs at the door. This is actually an extremely BASIC element of dog training and certainly NOTHING new.

In my experience (which is quite vast) trainers who see ANY tool as abuse, generally haven't been doing it long and/or don't have anything to back up their experience. There is a "new" local trainer here, she bashes method after method--she doesn't have one of her own and when quizzed I found out that in 12 yrs she's never herself actually owned a dog that was over one year....she always finds something wrong with them and gets rid of them under the guise of "I'm trying to raise a working dog and need soemthing specific" in actuality, the problem is that she has NO clue how to problem solve.

Btw, just so you don't think I'm pulling this out of my butt, I've been training dogs professionally for over 15 yrs and am a certified Master Trainer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'll try the cotton lead thing, it's certainly worth a shot. Thanks


FWIW, I've done obedience training with the dog, and she's better, but not great. It did fix her nipping and dominance issues, which were our main problems. She's a rescue and stubborn and I honestly don't work as hard with her as she needs.
: I'm trying to remedy that, her first owners were apparently useless so she was already set in her ways when I got her, and I haven't worked through all her issues yet.
 

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have you ever felt what a prong collar feels like? i have, i put a medium sized prong collar on my arm and had my husband pull on the ring. It doesnt hurt at all, it simply pinches. and that was on my bare skin. i use a prong collar on my dog to teach him not to pull and he has progressed alot! if you know how to use them properly, they are NOT a bad tool.
 

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I agree that prong collars are useful but need to be used correctly and sparingly. On a small dog, I would try a gentle leader and see if that works. I use one on a poodle and it is very good! He behaves so much better on this gentle leader...I am afraid even with a regular collar he is going to pull and break his neck. However, be careful about the gl in that they can snap and get quite a whiplash if you are not careful. They should be led by the nose from under the chin.

It takes a little effort to get them used to it...so let the dog walk around with it on (like any leash and collar). As far as jumping, the gl's are great at redirecting the dog to withhold certain behaviors.

A long down is great for containing the dog too...when the bell rings you can encourage a long down (up to 30 minutes). This takes time for the dog to do though.
 

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Though the discussion of collars is interesting (I personally like the prong, would never use a GL on a tiny dog unless I wanted to snap its neck, but this poster's problems really have nothing to do with collar choice), HOW is this dog leaping? Is it with growly, snappy, intent to harm? Or just excitement?

If it's just excitement, I don't like to correct strongly. I don't want the dog to say yay! Someone's coming! Here they come... and yow! My neck hurts! So people coming make my neck hurt? I'm not so sure I want people coming over anymore!

I would try to turn the situation around with distraction and work on creating a downward dog, not an upward dog. What does your dog like? Is she food motivated? Ball motivated? Have your SO or one of your kids go on the other side of the door and knock on it. You come toward the door saying who could that be? Dog is poised to jump the heck all over them. The door opens--and then suddenly a ball comes through the door, rolling along the ground, or three or four treats hit the ground. Her obsession with up, up, up becomes wow, down and sideways. It starts to break the groove that her brain is set in. You'll need to do it lots of times (with lots of people; put a treat bowl or a ball bowl outside your door and a sign on your door if you're expecting visitors). But with repetition the groove is re-set. If her response to the door opening is sniff frantically along the ground looking for her ball or treat while the person calmly steps around her and inside the house, you're only one step away from a sit or a down (which is then rewarded with a treat and then the treat is faded until you're rewarding only once in a while). There's not the need to both re-set her brain in a different direction and give a command.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by thekimballs
Though the discussion of collars is interesting (I personally like the prong, would never use a GL on a tiny dog unless I wanted to snap its neck, but this poster's problems really have nothing to do with collar choice), HOW is this dog leaping? Is it with growly, snappy, intent to harm? Or just excitement?

If it's just excitement, I don't like to correct strongly. I don't want the dog to say yay! Someone's coming! Here they come... and yow! My neck hurts! So people coming make my neck hurt? I'm not so sure I want people coming over anymore!

It's definitely excited happiness, she's not being aggressive at all. My personal opinion is just that she is so small that she wants to get up high enough to get petted. Like "hey, look at me! I'm down here!" But it's still annoying. We've tried praising her like crazy when she stays in her sit at the front door, thinking that would work and it does...so long as she gets petted pretty quickly. But once the petting is done and the person comes all the way in, she wants more attention and starts jumping again.

I like the idea of food at her level, and my mom is more likely to go along with that-she's one of those who thinks it's "cute" that my dog jumps all over her, and she actually encourages it
: So maybe I'll combine the leash training with a couple of treats Mom can toss at the ground.

That's definitely why I was asking about the prong collars, btw--I absolutely don't know what I'm doing with them, and I know they can be an excellent training tool but I'm one of the people who would be likely to hurt my dog if I wasn't using it correctly. If it were likely to make a big difference, I'd go to a good trainer or vet to find out how to use one correctly, but it sounds like I shouldn't be using them with this dog anyway.
 

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I don't praise a lot for any behavior that is supposed to distract from excitement (like sitting at the front door). Praising excites a dog, and creates energy, and sitting or holding another command bottles up that energy. So you release them and pow! dog jumps all over somebody (or runs around the room, or jumps on the couch, or whatever). I don't mind giving a treat silently to signal the dog that they did it right, but I basically want a dog at the door to be ignored by everyone coming through the door AND by me. Dogs shouldn't view door-opening as the most exciting (or tense, or rewarding) person-associated moment of their day. That's why if the ball comes through or the treats rain down it has to be unconnected to the human on the other side. Nobody gives a command, nobody says anything encouraging, they just walk through silently and calmly.
 
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