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Dh really wants to move to the country, he grew up in the country and wants to buy a house in the middle of nowhere.. Right now he drives about 25km each way for work and would like to live closer. He says he hates the city and we can never afford to buy a house in town anyway.<br>
I've always lived in town/city and the thought of moving to the country doesn't appeal to me.<br><br>
What are the pros to living in the country? What are the cons?<br>
(I have some cons I can think of - without actually having lived in the country I don't know if they are accurate so I want to see if anyone actually mentions them or if they are just in my head!)<br><br>
Thanks in advance!
 

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I grew up in the country and other than a few months of living in town, I've always lived in the country. I love it and probably can't think of many cons, though it would depend on the area you'd moving to.<br><br>
Its quiet, I hate going to my mom's and being able to look out her window into the neighbor's house, there's less traffic, more room for my kids to go exploring, I have room for all the animals I want, all the garden I want, well water.<br><br>
I guess the only con for me would be that more room takes more maintenance. We have cows and have to keep the fences up or they'll get out to steal fruit. Of course the animals and garden take care but I enjoy doing that so its not a con to me.<br><br>
Good luck!
 

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cons - takes longer to get places and more gas<br>
pro - you don't need to go as many places because you can be more self sufficient and there is more to do that costs $0 in the country and you don't need a gym to keep fit if you have animals and gardens etc to maintain<br>
con - more maintenance work<br>
pros - fresh air, well water, septic is cheaper than county sewer and more ecological, space, peace, quiet, room to roam, lots for kids to explore and hopefully they will not grow up the "norm" understanding electrons and protons but unable to name more than 2 american trees, I could go on. I love the country <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/joy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="joy">:<br>
Oh, and it's cheaper. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> and healthier <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I'll just link to my post on another thread <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?p=11405704#post11405704" target="_blank">http://www.mothering.com/discussions...4#post11405704</a>
 

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I've lived in the country, for basicly my entire life. I did live in Salamanca Spain for 9 months, and in the dorms in college for about 6 monthsish. Anyways, the only real downside I see to country living is that you *have* to drive most everywhere. I suppose you could ride your bicycle (my dad did that for years, rode his bike to work'n back), but its not practicle with children, at least not around here (lots of big hills).<br><br>
The upside? You can have a garden & animals so you don't need to buy as much food. You can hike and play around your house, and have lots of stuff to do without going anywhere. Theres always something that needs doing (atm I'm slacking on my applesauce/apple butter making duities<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> and DH is outside picking pears to make pear cider), so boredom is rarely an issue. Its quiet and peaceful, and beatiful.<br><br>
If i lived in a city, I would have to live in an apartment in a downtown area where I could walk EVERYWHERE - like I could do when I lived in Spain (in those 9 months, I was in a car twice - once to get my bags from the airport and once to take them back.). I would never, ever, never want to live in a suburb/small town/etc where I still had to drive most places!!
 

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Two months ago, we moved from a tiny apartment in the city/suburbs to a house on 3 acres in the country. I have always lived "in town" - grew up in a mid-sized city (pop: 200,000), then moved to a smaller town/suburb (pop: 11,000) outside of another mid-sized city (pop: 115,000) as a teenager.<br><br>
I definitely think the pros outweigh the cons for us, but we both really wanted to make this change in our lives and wouldn't have done it if either of us wasn't on board. The biggest "pro" for us was being homeowners without an HOA. We didn't want strict rules about clotheslines, gardening, compost piles, animals, lawn care, paint colors, etc. Our priority is being able to live a "farm life" - growing food, raising animals, homeschooling, and other things that go along with homesteading without it being seen as strange or wrong. Any other positives that come along with that are bonuses to us.<br><br>
Some of those bonuses include the hospitality and friendliness of a small town. I would have thought it was a myth or stereotype until we moved here and experienced it over and over again. I also feel safer out here. We still lock our home and vehicles, but I don't worry anymore about them getting broken into anyway. I also feel more confident about one day letting our kids play out in the yard without constant hovering supervision. Another thing I really love is the wildlife. We have already had deer and turkeys come through the yard and I love watching them!<br><br>
I want to mention that while we live in a rural area, we are five minutes from two towns (one with 7,000 people and the other with 500) and a half hour from the "big city" we moved away from. DH's commute to work tripled in distance, but only takes 10 minutes longer because there's so much less traffic out here. We also have more neighbors within a small area than we would if we were alone on 20-40 acres, so there are still the noises of people's dogs, lawnmowers, etc, which would bother some people but I find them comforting.<br><br>
These two things (distance from important places and number/closeness of neighbors) eliminate a lot of the "cons" of country living that I was worried about.<br><br>
There are still a few things I dislike about living here that I would consider as cons:<br>
1) There is no reasonably-priced high-speed internet access out here. This is a huge issue to me and I am still adjusting to dealing with dial-up (which is costing MORE than our DSL did because we have to pay for a land line, which we wouldn't have otherwise).<br><br>
2) We are used to using our cell phones as our only phones and the reception out here is terrible - we often miss calls and sometimes our phones don't even let us know someone called at all. It doesn't make sense to get rid of our cell phones because we need them for car emergencies and when we are both out of the house in separate places. But, we can't afford to get ANOTHER land line to make and receive calls from.<br><br>
3) I may be the only adult here who is actually afraid of the dark, but I'm not ashamed. It has been really hard for me to get used to not having street lights and the fact that it is not acceptable to leave an outside light on all night. I hate it when we get home after dark and have to walk around the house in the pitch black. I foresee this taking at least a year or two for me to adjust to, if not longer.
 

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When Sihaya just mentioned getting home after dark it reminded me that one of the great advantages, to me, of living in the country, is that you can see SO MANY stars!!
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I may be the only adult here who is actually afraid of the dark, but I'm not ashamed.</td>
</tr></table></div>
I've almost always lived in the country and am scared of the dark. I hate being outside anywhere when its dark. But I have a nice, big, protective dog and he helps a ton with it.<br><br>
Just so you know you're not alone!
 

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I grew up in the country and am now enjoying more of a town life. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="innocent"> DH and I lived in the country for the first few years we were married, but in the end it wasn't for us at this point in our life. DH works long hours, driving almost 35 miles each way really cut into what little family life we had. Not to mention that when he finally did get home, in the winter he would have to go out and plow for an hour. I knew all about the isolation having grown up that far from town, but I found it was hard even harder as a parent.<br><br><br>
We choose to move 7 miles from town, we are still in the country, living now is a rural subdivision. We don't have all the land that we used to but it's enough for us. The biggest perk is that the roads here are maintained and all we have to do is snow blow our short driveway! We have much more time to spent together since there is no plowing, DH's commute is quick. I guess you say we made a compromise, less land, closer neighbors, I still get to look at beautiful woods out my windows, and the trip to town is something that can be done on a whim instead of careful planning.
 

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I grew up in the Appalachian mountains of eastern Kentucky and I'm so glad to be back there. We lived in a large city of nearly 8 years and DH and I never got used to it. After our first DD was born we started the process to get back home because neither of us could imagine raising our children there. So, there are really no cons if you don't mind a little work, and less access to things like health food stores, and such. I do miss the Waldorf school in the city, but I can make homeschool or public school work for us whichever we decide.
 

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I think country vs city depends entirely on how you want to live your life. The pros for one person would be a con for another. City people (may) find pros to be living close to other people yet in comfortable anomity, prevalant office/retail/labor jobs, conveniences, shopping, entertainment and so on. And for a country person, they may not find any of those pros to be pros at all.<br><br>
I've lived in the suburbs all my life, and currently living in a rural city which I really find to be the best of both worlds. We live in a drop-dead gorgeous natural area, but also have grocery store and so on close by. A college in town. And farms everywhere. And you can even find places (like hiking) where you can't see any human establishment (road, buildings, whatever).<br><br>
But as my priorities are starting to change, I'm finding I see the plot of land I live on very differently. I love our house but I'm starting to be frustrated with the layout of the land, because I can use very little of it for self-sustainance. It's pretty but a lot of it is useless. I sure didn't think of any "use" for land except for maybe lawn chairs and a swing set when I moved in. Now I want to pick up my house and plop it on a better/larger plot of country land. My point is that when I want to DO is driving where I want to live.<br><br>
So you and DH should talk more seriously about the kind of lifestyle you can both agree on.<br><br>
Do consider a rural city, could be a good solution for you guys.
 

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We wanted country living but hate a long commute (my DH had one before and it was the pits) so we moved to a rural area but live right next to the city. I guess it's a suburb but it's from the 1960's so the plots are all over 0.5 acres. It's a 4.5 minute commute to work for hubby so it's a great deal. There are also enough houses here so that there's cable internet.<br><br>
Pros: Large vegetable garden, quiet, nice views, larger property, short commute to work and stores/library/parks, low crime rate, fun working in garden, sit out on the deck and check out the stars at night, septic and well water, no building permits for things like fences and renovations<br>
Cons: No street lights (I'm another one afraid of the dark) or sidewalks, no walking everywhere, lots of work in the house and garden, can't keep animals (plot is too small)
 

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I just moved from the country to the city.<br><br>
If we could afford it, I'd move back in a heartbeat. however, the cost of living was much higher (to put it in perspective - we were paying over $100 more for a 2 bedroom apartment up there, than we are for a large 4 bedroom house now). Gas was higher, and living in the country it takes much longer to get to a store and you have to add in that expense of gas on top of whatever you're buying. In addition, jobs will be further away, taking more out of your pay checks. my husband had a job over an hour away... And his paycheck was greatly reduced because of that. Because of where we lived, and what he was qualified for, he could not get a job any closer to home.<br><br>
It's quiet, but it can take longer for EMS to arrive, if you ever needed them to, depending on where you live. It can be harder to obtain luxuries like DSL.<br><br>
On the other hand, if you're really in the country and you have enough land, you can raise your own meat, or hunt your own land, and reduce your dependence on having to buy things dramatically.
 
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