Mothering Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,339 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I'm writing a paper on the psychological benefits of breastfeeding for Mommy and baby. Do you know where I might be able to find some of the current research on this topic?<br><br>
I really appreciate it.<br><br>
Faith
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,009 Posts
I only have a sec and don't have any links for you, but I wanted to tell you that I had *terrible* PPD and one of the best things for me during that time was bfing. I know this isn't research, but still, something you may be able to keep in mind....Basically, it allowed me to feel that I was still in control of something and still providing my baby with something no one else could, something that she really loved and that was absolutely the best possible thing for her. That really, really helped me during that time. I would consider that a psychological benefit. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,355 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Richelle</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I only have a sec and don't have any links for you, but I wanted to tell you that I had *terrible* PPD and one of the best things for me during that time was bfing. I know this isn't research, but still, something you may be able to keep in mind....Basically, it allowed me to feel that I was still in control of something and still providing my baby with something no one else could, something that she really loved and that was absolutely the best possible thing for her. That really, really helped me during that time. I would consider that a psychological benefit. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"> Richelle, I could have wrote this exact same post. I went through the same thing. I thought it was just me, and then I heard Brooke Shields on Oprah talking about how bf'ing helped her through ppd also. I believe there have also been some studies recently that on average bf moms have less instances and less severe cases of ppd than ff moms. To me, it gave me a reason to stay attached to my baby. If I was ff, it would have been so tempting to run away for a few days when I was so overwhelmed with everything. I felt like I just wanted to go to a hotel and be by myself and rest. BFing kept me with my bab, because he needed me. It made me be strong for him, because he needed his mommy to be well!<br><br>
Another thing I have read is that bf'ing releases hormones that help you sleep better. I know during those first few weeks, I was able to function on the short little cat-naps that were only possible. I would have never been able to manage before. I am one of those people that needs LOTS of sleep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
I'm not sure about the research into this topic, but I do know that bf'ing helped me heal emotionally from a traumatic c/s and that it has vastly improved my sense of self-worth and the respect that I have for myself as a person and a mother. I have heard others say the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43,705 Posts
I know there's a ton of bf info at <a href="http://www.kellymom.com" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com</a> I don't know if she has EXACTLY what you're looking for on the site but it's a great resource and Kelly is wonderful! You can email her from the site if you have more questions that aren't currently answered on her site.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,977 Posts
Here's some info from an excellent comprehensive document found at:<br><br><a href="http://www.lalecheleague.org/cbi/Biospec.htm" target="_blank">www.lalecheleague.org/cbi/Biospec.htm</a><br><br>
sources are given so perhaps you could track down the published papers for more details.<br><br><br><br>
1.Parent-child relationships<br>
Children who were breast fed for a longer duration were more likely, at age 15-18 years, to report higher levels of parental attachment and tended to perceive their mothers as being more caring and less overprotective towards them compared with bottle-fed children. After adjustment for maternal and perinatal factors, the duration of breastfeeding remained significantly associated with adolescent perceptions of maternal care, with increasing duration of breast feeding being associated with higher levels of perceived maternal care during childhood. Fergusson DM, Woodward LJ. "Breast feeding and later psychosocial adjustment." Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol 1999 Apr;13(2):144-57<br><br><br>
Mother’s Emotional Health<br>
Significant changes occur in women's personality during pregnancy and lactation. The trend is toward a lifestyle interpreted as more relaxed and tolerant to monotony. In this study of 161 women during pregnancy and 3-6 months after delivery, women who had breastfed for at least 8 weeks differed significantly from those who had not. They had lower scores on the Somatic Anxiety, Muscular Tension, Monotony Avoidance, Suspicion, Social Desirability and the Impulsiveness scale and higher scores on the Socialization scale. Sjogren-B et al. "Changes in personality pattern during the first pregnancy and lactation." Journal-Of-Psychosomatic-Obstetrics-And-Gynecology. Mar 2000; 21 (1):31-38.<br><br>
Personality profiles reflecting anxiety and social interaction showed that anxiety was inversely related with basal levels of oxytocin and prolactin in the cesarean section mothers, whereas the pulsatility of oxytocin was related to social desirability in both groups. Social desirability and oxytocin pulsativity were also correlated with the amount of milk transferred from the mother to the baby. The correlations indicate that central oxytocin may be involved in behavioral adaptations to the maternal role. Nissen E, Gustavsson P, Widstrom AM, Uvnas-Moberg K. "Oxytocin, prolactin, milk production and their relationship with personality traits in women after vaginal delivery or Cesarean section." J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol 1998 Mar;19(1):49-58<br><br>
In both male and female rats, oxytocin exerts potent physiological antistress effects. If daily oxytocin injections are repeated over a 5-day period, blood pressure is decreased by 10-20 mmHg, the withdrawal latency to heat stimuli is prolonged, cortisol levels are decreased and insulin and cholecystokinin levels are increased. These effects last from 1 to several weeks after the last injection. After repeated oxytocin treatment weight gain may be promoted and the healing rate of wounds increased. Oxytocin released in response to social stimuli may be part of a neuroendocrine substrate which underlies the benefits of positive social experiences. Uvnas-Moberg K. "Oxytocin may mediate the benefits of positive social interaction and emotions." Psychoneuroendocrinology 1998 Nov;23(8):819-35<br><br>
At one month postpartum, women who breast fed their infants had scores indicating less anxiety and more mutuality than the women bottle feeding their infants. Virden, S.F., "The Relationship Between Infant Feeding Method and Maternal Role Adjustment." Journal of Nurse Midwives, 1988 Jan-Feb;33(1):31-5.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,339 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes! This is exactly what I was looking for!!! Thank u velcromom!!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"> I can't wait to look into it.<br><br>
Faith<br><br><br><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>velcromom</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Here's some info from an excellent comprehensive document found at:<br><br><a href="http://www.lalecheleague.org/cbi/Biospec.htm" target="_blank">www.lalecheleague.org/cbi/Biospec.htm</a><br><br>
sources are given so perhaps you could track down the published papers for more details.<br><br><br><br>
1.Parent-child relationships<br>
Children who were breast fed for a longer duration were more likely, at age 15-18 years, to report higher levels of parental attachment and tended to perceive their mothers as being more caring and less overprotective towards them compared with bottle-fed children. After adjustment for maternal and perinatal factors, the duration of breastfeeding remained significantly associated with adolescent perceptions of maternal care, with increasing duration of breast feeding being associated with higher levels of perceived maternal care during childhood. Fergusson DM, Woodward LJ. "Breast feeding and later psychosocial adjustment." Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol 1999 Apr;13(2):144-57<br><br><br>
Mother’s Emotional Health<br>
Significant changes occur in women's personality during pregnancy and lactation. The trend is toward a lifestyle interpreted as more relaxed and tolerant to monotony. In this study of 161 women during pregnancy and 3-6 months after delivery, women who had breastfed for at least 8 weeks differed significantly from those who had not. They had lower scores on the Somatic Anxiety, Muscular Tension, Monotony Avoidance, Suspicion, Social Desirability and the Impulsiveness scale and higher scores on the Socialization scale. Sjogren-B et al. "Changes in personality pattern during the first pregnancy and lactation." Journal-Of-Psychosomatic-Obstetrics-And-Gynecology. Mar 2000; 21 (1):31-38.<br><br>
Personality profiles reflecting anxiety and social interaction showed that anxiety was inversely related with basal levels of oxytocin and prolactin in the cesarean section mothers, whereas the pulsatility of oxytocin was related to social desirability in both groups. Social desirability and oxytocin pulsativity were also correlated with the amount of milk transferred from the mother to the baby. The correlations indicate that central oxytocin may be involved in behavioral adaptations to the maternal role. Nissen E, Gustavsson P, Widstrom AM, Uvnas-Moberg K. "Oxytocin, prolactin, milk production and their relationship with personality traits in women after vaginal delivery or Cesarean section." J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol 1998 Mar;19(1):49-58<br><br>
In both male and female rats, oxytocin exerts potent physiological antistress effects. If daily oxytocin injections are repeated over a 5-day period, blood pressure is decreased by 10-20 mmHg, the withdrawal latency to heat stimuli is prolonged, cortisol levels are decreased and insulin and cholecystokinin levels are increased. These effects last from 1 to several weeks after the last injection. After repeated oxytocin treatment weight gain may be promoted and the healing rate of wounds increased. Oxytocin released in response to social stimuli may be part of a neuroendocrine substrate which underlies the benefits of positive social experiences. Uvnas-Moberg K. "Oxytocin may mediate the benefits of positive social interaction and emotions." Psychoneuroendocrinology 1998 Nov;23(8):819-35<br><br>
At one month postpartum, women who breast fed their infants had scores indicating less anxiety and more mutuality than the women bottle feeding their infants. Virden, S.F., "The Relationship Between Infant Feeding Method and Maternal Role Adjustment." Journal of Nurse Midwives, 1988 Jan-Feb;33(1):31-5.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,142 Posts
I believe that Marie Osmand's book about PPD also addresses the hormonal benefits of bf on the mother.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,142 Posts
Also try <a href="http://www.kellymom.com" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com</a>
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top