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<p>The other day I wrote to ask about overactive letdown and decreasing my supply, which I seem to have figured out (we nurse every 3 hours and baby has learned how to deal with the letdown by herself), but now I seem to have a new problem...</p>
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<p>I return to work next week and have been pumping this week during the times I will be able to pump at work to get both of our bodies into a routine. Dh bottle feeds her 2xs, which is as many times as I pump. She is still eating her usual 8-9 times a day, but it seems to be that she is spending less time per feeding at the breast (although my breasts still feel empty after she is done). All of a sudden, when I went to pump yesterday nothing happened, not even a drop. This morning I tried again and same thing. I thought maybe it was the pump so I changed the batteries, checked the flanges and lines and then I even tried the handpump (which I have always been successful with) and nothing. Usually I have a let-down after 2 1/2 hours but it has now been 4 hours and nothing. I am stressed enough about going back to work next week I don't want to have to worry about supply issues!</p>
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<p>The lactation consultant in my area never returns phone calls and I think I need some support and advice! </p>
 

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<p>I'm sorry I have no advice, only to say I have had a similar problem- going back to school next week, pumping to get a little cache of milk for when I'm gone and I'm producing half as much (sometimes less) than I was when I first began pumping. Maybe stress?</p>
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<p>I see you've gone back to work already, what did you do? How did you get through it?</p>
 

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<p>Yes, I had similar problems, I could not pump enough to make it worth while. I had a hefty supply, but just couldnt pump it. I could leak it though.</p>
 

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Started pumping cause Baby was not feeding and it was working out fine, but now NOTHING except a dribble. I will have it so far up my nipple feels like it will pop off. Then I discovered that even if he latches on foe a few seconds and gets things flowing I can hand express it quite easily (the right more than the left) If you cant have your baby with you to start it..... I know this may sound wierd to some but can you reach your breast with your mouth? Love to all the pumping mamas keepin their babies healthy. its hard work!
 

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<p>I found some good info on Kellymom <a href="http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/pumping_decrease.html" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/pumping_decrease.html</a></p>
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<p>There is also a link to a calculator to determine how much pumped milk an EBF baby should need, which I found helpful.</p>
 

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<p>It really does sound like a let-down issue doesn't it? Her nursing for less time now would be normal. Many babies become efficient nursers after  a few weeks and can quickly get what they need. There's a lot of research on hands-on pumping that seems to increase substantially the amount of milk many women are able to pump. Here's a great link for a video <a href="http://newborns.stanford.edu/Breastfeeding/MaxProduction.html" target="_blank">http://newborns.stanford.edu/Breastfeeding/MaxProduction.html</a><span style="display:none;"> </span>   Using your hands to massage the breasts while relaxing and thinking of baby may be helpful. Additionally a look at the fit of the flanges can sometimes help. (Nipple size changes as your body adjusts to pumping) If the nipple is tight or rubbing against the sides of the tunnel when you're pumping, moving up a size should help as well. That's such a hard place to be and I wish you all the best!</p>
 

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I pumped so much milk with DD1. Then this last time around, I couldn't get even an ounce, ever, even when I'd been away from the twins for three hours or more. I just couldn't get the letdown reflex to respond to the pump. It happens. The only way I could get milk out was to put a baby on one breast, and the pump on the other, so that the baby would trigger the letdown.<br><br>
What I learned: the letdown reflex is strongly psychological, and you can "trick" it by using different associations and triggers. It's also a learned reflex, to letdown for a pump (which of course doesn't have the powerful hormonal connection with you that baby does).<br><br>
Some things that can help, if you can't have baby there with you to get the flow going-- a picture of baby, a video of baby to watch, especially one of baby crying, an audio recording of your baby crying for hunger, a few "dirty" baby clothes--- not dirty, just not laundered, so that they smell like baby-- or one of baby's blankets. Sometimes you'll get a letdown while sitting in a particular place, or looking at something in particular, and then you have to be in those same conditions, to get it to happen again. Double pumping can help. Playing around with flange size can help. Drinking water right before, and massaging the breasts, can help. Applying heat can help. But I never found a better trick than watching videos of DS crying for me.<br><br>
Spending less time at the breast is normal for babies this age. It doesn't happen to all of them, but it happens to many. It doesn't mean you're not producing. What you might notice, though, is that you're not producing EXTRA anymore, so it can seem like you have less than you have before. So I wouldn't be concerned about supply-- unless you've seen that baby has stopped gaining or peeing, of course.<br><br>
Stress can inhibit the letdown, too. Sometimes it can help to stop thinking about it. Put on a good TV show, and just chill, and let the pump go without paying it too much attention. That might do the trick.<br><br>
 

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<p>My son is 3 months old today and I had two episodes with no milk not even a drop.  The first one lasted three days.  The second episode lasted almost two days.  The first time, I drank Milkmaid tea from Babies R Us and pumped every 2-3 hours even though I didn't get any milk; each pump session lasted 10 minutes on each breast.  The second time, I pumped 15 minutes per breast every 3-4 hours and drank extra water and milk. I also ate more protein.</p>
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<p>Also, I find the pump makes a big difference.  I use the Lansinoh manual pump; it's simple and I don't have to worry about adjusting the pressure and speed.  With my older son, I tried a variety pumps--Medela electric and manual, Ameda electric, and Evenflo manual (thankfully, my husband was very supportive of my spending on these breast pumps).  I didn't get as much milk with these pumps until I used the Lansinoh manual pump. </p>
 
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