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Hi All,<br>
I have a 2 week old who is BF-ing. I will be going back to work in 6 more weeks, then part time from home and part time from the office for a few more weeks before going back full time. I am going to have to pump a lot as I plan on nursing DD as much as possible and hoping that I can maintain a good supply through pumping at work. (Shooting for her to be EBF). My first DD I BF-d for almost 4 years, and she never took a bottle, so I am not sure how all this works.<br><br>
I just tried pumping and got less than an ounce. ???? My supply is great...DD nurses and I can feel my milk let down and it sprays everywhere...lol. But I can't seems to get any with the pump. I have the super duper $300-something Medela pump.<br><br>
So my questions...why can't I get milk out when I pump? When I start pumping more, do I pump after I feed baby? Before? In between feedings?<br><br>
What are good resources to figure out how to do this?<br><br>
Thanks so much,<br>
JO
 

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I think most people would tell you to pump after, so the babe gets all he needs. But whenever I did that I got nothing. I started pumping before, but I didn't suck it all out- I left about half in for ds. I also pump more in the morning when my supply is greatest and during his naps I sometimes try to get some out.
 

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A lot of women can't "let down" for a pump the way they can for a baby. You could try pumping while you are feeding baby, or just keep practicing with the pump and count on getting better. I think that the earlier you start pumping, the faster it will get easier.
 

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Getting a full ounce after nursing a newborn is pretty good- it's probably enough for a full feeding at this point!<br><br>
I'd suggest pumping once a day and freezing the milk. This gives you extra milk to keep in the freezer (be sure to rotate it so the milk in the freezer doesn't get too old to use) plus it stimulates your body to make more milk than the baby needs- making it easier to pump enough milk later when you're actually at work. I would continue doing that after you're at work, even on your days off, in addition to pumping while at work. Don't worry about how much you get per pumping session right now- getting into the habit of pumping, and teaching your body to respond to the pump, is more important right now.<br><br>
The best time to introduce a bottle to the baby is between 4 and 6 weeks of age- after BF is well established, but before the baby is old enough to reject the bottle completely.
 

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If you have the Pump in Style with the dual mode (the stimulant mode and then after the let down, whatever they call it) I found that prolonging the stimulant mode helps. Before the end of that first cycle, I think it lasts a minute, turn off pump quickly and repeat it. I find that works for me. Massaging breasts. Briefly pop off a flange and put it back on sometimes helps me to get it going again.<br><br>
I would prolong the bottle intro for as long as you can but as soon as you can, start pumping to build a supply. Work, sleeplessness and just life makes pumping and working very hard. Then I would be leaving the day's fresh milk for the following day and freeze left over. And just leave frozen milk in freezer as probably inevitably, you will get behind and will really need that frozen milk. Though maybe you will be more lucky than me! I was able to freeze 6 ounces last week and it's a huge relief knowing I have even that little bit.
 

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Remember that pumping at work is totall different than pumping along with full-time, "from the tap" nursing. When away from baby, you are pumping to remove what she would eat. At home, it's in addition to what baby needs, so getting an ounce really isn't that bad.<br><br>
Check out <a href="http://www.kellymom.com" target="_blank">www.kellymom.com</a> for wonderful, detailed advice. There's also a Working and Student Moms forum here that's great and chock full of tips and advice.<br><br>
Try to think of these beginning pumping sessions purely as practice. Don't worry about how much you're getting, if anything at all. Focus on the idea that you're practicing, getting to know your pump, familiarizing yourself with the settings and equipment. Before you know it, you'll be pumping a good amount.<br><br>
Many moms, myself included, cannot think for a second about how much they're getting or the milk stops flowing. Watch a movie, read a magazine, flip through photos of the baby, or whatever, just keep your mind off the ounces.<br><br>
There's thousands of moms who head to work fulltime everyday with pump bags slung over a shoulder. Thousands of moms who manage to have EBF babies for at least 6 months and whio nurse beyond infancy even while working full time. It can be done. It takes lots of determination, willpower, work and support, but it can be done.<br><br>
Feel free to PM me anytime if you need ANYTHING! Help, advice, encouragement, whatever. I've been there. I'm got a 14 mo nursling, I went back to work FT at 7 weeks PP and I've dealt with a lot of issues. Seriously. PM me anytime!
 
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