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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need help!<br>
My puppy is not catching on to house training very well. I am crate training and she will sometimes go in there. She also will never let us know when you needs to go when out and about the house.<br>
Can anyone offer me any advice. How can I get her to let me know she need to go outside for potty reasons.<br>
Thanks
 

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I don't have much time right now so I'll ask some questions.<br>
1) How old is the puppy?<br>
2) How big is the puppy & how big is the crate?<br>
3) Does she tend to have accidents in the same area of the house?<br>
4) Do you use the same exit everytime she goes out and is there anything there to make it easier to notify you--ie: bells
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
OK<br>
1) she is six months<br>
2) she is a bichon which I hear is harder to train<br>
3) she seems to go on the carpet by the garage door. Actually she goes everywhere<br>
4) we take her out the garage door to an outdoor pen area. There is nothing there as in bells or the like to let us know she needs to go. I guess I figured she would come and tell me. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rolleyes">
 

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Take her outside often to pee.... after sleeping, after eating, after playing, etc. Also take her to the same spot outside and praise her when she goes. She's fairly old to be still having accidents. Have you had her since she was a baby or did someone else have her??
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That is what I thought about her being old enough to not have accidents.<br>
We do praise her verbally when she goes. Should we give her a small treat too?<br>
We got her from a breeder as a small pup.
 

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Ok, I'm back <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br>
A few things, you didn't mention the size of her crate, it should only be big enough for her to stand up, lay down and turn around--once she's clean in it, it's fine to be larger, in the mean time, if you can block off an area of it it may be helpfull. Also be sure you're not putting any newspaper in there. With dogs who are being dirty in the crate I also prefer no blankets--it soaks up the pee so they don't actually have to 'live' with it.<br>
You can hang some bells by the door you are using, whenever you take her out, direct her to push them with her nose--as soon as a bell makes any noise, the door majically opens. Often dogs go to the door but if nobody sees them right away, they just go to the bathroom whereever, that she often goes to the bathroom there makes me think this is happening. She will grasp the cause and effect of ringing the bells much quicker than coming to get you.<br>
Yes give her a special treat when she goes outside and make a big hairy deal out of it, what she's just done is the most special thing she could do. by the same token, should you ever catch her in the act inside the house, you will do another acadamy award winning performance of your massive disapointment. Also, start to attach a command to her going, just as she squats to go, say "good girl, go pee" or whatever term you want to use.<br>
If you take her out and she doesn't go, put her back in the crate for an hour until you take her back out, again, if she doesn't go, she goes back in her kennel until she does go outside.<br><br>
Female bichons are notorious for being difficult to housebreak, but it is doable, it just takes a little more dedication. Until she is reliable, she should not be out of your site--unless she has JUST gone to the bathroom outside. You can use a tie down strap, a 4' lead, tied off to a coffee table or some other spot in the room you're in at the time.
 

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<span style="font-family:'Comic Sans MS';">Above post sounds to me like the crate is being used as a punishment... don't like the sounds of this. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: I worked in a vet clinic for many years and I have NEVER heard tell of that.</span>
 

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In what way?? I never said above and have never said to a client to use a crate as punishment.<br>
I am a registered vet tech and a certified master trainer. I have some experience too. I've been training dogs for 17 yrs now.
 

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<span style="font-family:'Comic Sans MS';">You and I have different ways of doing things.... not a big deal. I just do not think that the puppy should be 'put' in the crate unless it is bedtime or the family is gone from the home. I think puppy needs to be part of all of the goings on in the home. Just my opinion. Take a pill.....</span>
 

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To lighten things up a bit.......<br><br>
Here's one for ya.<br><br>
My 21 month old male pekingese/chin mix has never really been housebroken. He does great as long as he has access to outside, unrestricted. But the minute the door is closed (fall) he starts going wherever. Is there hope for him?<br><br>
A little backround.... I am NOT a disciplinarian at all. Getting angry about things like pee and poo are not in my nature, so I kinda let things go for a long time. I also have an old dog that often doesn't make it through the night (I am a heavy sleeper sometimes) so there is a place for her to pee inside. My boy doesn't use her spot, but I think he thinks its okay to go inside.<br><br>
Any suggestions for a more harmonious pee-free home?<br><br>
ediesmom
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>canadianchick</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><span style="font-family:'Comic Sans MS';">You and I have different ways of doing things.... not a big deal. I just do not think that the puppy should be 'put' in the crate unless it is bedtime or the family is gone from the home. I think puppy needs to be part of all of the goings on in the home. Just my opinion. Take a pill.....</span></div>
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EXCUSE ME????? You come on and accuse me of using a crate as a displinary tool--something that I in no way did. You qualify all your knowledge that you worked at a freakin vet clinic for a number of years (funny I worked with 2 vets who never did manage to housebreak their dogs--answering the phone at a clinic in NO way makes you a dog trainer) and then you give me your little irked face and your response to my asking you how I suggested using a crate as disipline is to tell me to take a pill??? I would respectively suggest it sounds as if you are perhaps off your medication.<br><br>
The way I do things and the advice I provided are standard crate training methods. There was NO punishment that involved the crate. If the owner knows the dog should have to go and she doesnt go while she's out, lettign the dog loose in the house is likely to cause the dog to have YET ANOTHER ACCIDENT--oh yeah, that's what this person has already been doing--and guess what?? It's not working.<br>
Perhaps your preference would be that this dog owner continue to do what she's already been doing (which by the way is the advice you gave her--just keep doing what you're doing that hasn't been working for 6 mos) and then eventually when she gets tired of stepping in wet spots and the dog is around 18 mos she can then drop Fido at the pound where another family will have the same problems. But at least the dog wouldn't have to endure a couple weeks of extra crating that would solve the problem and provide her with freedom for the rest of her life.<br><br>
Yes yes, I like your plan much better.<br><br>
Give me a f***ing break, like I haven't dealt with enough crap this week. Tell you what, you take over for me, everyone can PM you from now on with problems about their dogs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
OK, today just one accident!<br>
Yeah!!!<br>
The crate, clean and just one pee pee accident on the floor.<br>
I am still not getting the bell idea. But with only one day in - only one accident is alot.<br>
Thanks sooo much!!!
 

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I think the crate training is a very effective way of doing it. It is the best tool you can have. I used it for training my dogs, not only for housebreaking. It keeps their focus on you. It is really not a punishment either, because dogs are den animals.
 

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My personal preference is the sleigh bells that you can get on a leather strap, hang them from the doorknob at your dog's head height. If you can't find them this far from x-mas you can just hang a regular bell from the doorknob--just make sure it comes down to the level of the dog's nose and that it is loud enough to be heard from whereever in the house you are.
 

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Shannon ((((((hugs))))))))) <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/luxlove.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="throb">
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Oh I have those sleigh bells packed in the x-mas box. What a new, useful and year round use for them!! And I love the sound they make.<br>
I will dig those out and try.<br>
Do I just guide her nose to them or how exactly do I get her to use them? Like should I have her ring them once then open the door. Just how do I get her to understand that she needs to ring the bell when she needs to go out?<br>
Thanks. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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We just crate trained our pup this past winter. I used the method Shannon described and it worked well. Georgie was allowed to run around with us when she had just gone. When it was getting time for her to go out (but not quite) I would put her on a lead attached to me (so she couldn't go off and root for a spot to pee on the carpet). I also taught her a pee command so she knew exactly what I wanted her to do when she went outside. It is so automatic that I can get her to have a pee just before we get into the car, even if she doesn't have a full bladder: handy! It was some hard work for a few weeks and needed total consistency. She has been perfect for months now (she's 11 months old). Oh, and I had to remove her crate bedding or she would pee on it, and I had to put a large box in the crate to make the crate small enough for her to not be able to pee in the corner.<br><br>
I got this advice from a book called 'The Art of Raising a Puppy" by the New Skete Monks. I found similar advice in lots of places. Now that our dog is totally reliable she is welcome to be out of her crate all the time we are here to supervise her. She still jumps up and eats off of counters and other things that mean when we are out of the room for very long we pop her in her crate. Usually the kids have worn her out good and she uses those breaks as a nap time. Not a hardship for her.
 

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If she's food motivated then lure her nose to the bells with a treat--as soon as the bell rings you open the door. It's not so much that she will make the quick connection to ring the bells when she needs to go out, but she will quickly learn that as soon as those bells ring, the door opens. If she is having a lot of her accidents near the door, it's likely she goes there and stares at it trying to figure out how to get to the other side. Dogs are masters of what works for them and if ringing the bell works to open the door, she'll catch on in no time. I did have one dog I had to remove the bells for, she was a little too smart and would constantly go and ring the bell. Then while outside she soon figured out that if she barked like someone had pulled in the driveway (we were on 100 acres with a 4 km driveway and she was not the friendliest of beasts) that one of us would come running from whereever we were. I saw the light go off when she got me to come running out of the shower one morning at 5:00 because I couldnt' be sure she was faking it and she was a protection trained dog. I went running to find her standing on the porch wagging her tail at me :LOL<br><br>
Carolynn!! I'm so glad to hear that Georgie is doing so well <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I saw a parti coloured standard poodle at the Burlington Run for the Cure the other weekend--I almost went and asked if it was you, but I was embarassed <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/bag.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Bag">:
 

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Umm. I just wanted to give my support for the crate training method. I crate trained my dog exactly as Shannon0218 decribed. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Ella loves her crate. She uses it to take naps in and get away from a nosy/busy household. She was also housebroken completely by 4 months. Oh, and I also leashed her to me at ALL times she was not in the crate, until I could trust her alone in the house.<br><br>
I feel if the dog is spending time in the crate only at bedtime and when alone at home then it will seem like a punishment, not a safe refuge.
 

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I just wanted to add- The Monks of New Skete book is excellent. I read it cover to cover before getting my dog and it helped SOO much!
 
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