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Hey there, y'all. It's been a while since I've been around!<br><br>
Anyhoo... I am planning on TTC in the near future and glad that I am armed and ready with information about homebirth and other imminent decisions...<br><br>
I've been thinking about my friends' and family's hospital births, and I have mental comebacks (I generally keep them to myself, <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">) for each of the "emergencies" they had that "necessitated" further interventions.<br><br>
One I can't quite figure out... This was my friends M's second baby after a reasonable vaginal birth in a military hospital in Germany. This time (in a US hospital), she was scheduled for induction but began to labor (and-- IIRC-- her waters broke on their own) at about 40 weeks, give or take. I don't remember the entire birth story, but I know they augmented with pitocin and I THINK she had an epi eventually, as well. They saw decels as she was pushing (with no baby forthcoming, according to them) and decided that the baby was not coming on his own, so they did a C/S. According to her OB, baby was all tangled up in his cord and was "bungee-jumping" during pushing-- and would either never come out on his own or was losing too much oxygen (cord compression?) in the attempt to move down the birth canal. IIRC, baby was neither small nor large-- somewhere between 6.5 and 8.5 pounds.<br><br>
M seems to accept these events without question, although she is mad at the doc for other reasons, since she ended up with A) a severe kidney infection, B) lots of adhesions and C) a horrible jagged keloid later corrected.<br><br>
All of this is moot for her as she recently had a hysterectomy (probably not related to the C/S at all, but definitely not primarily).<br><br>
I'm just wondering about this because it seems fishy to me, but I can't put my finger on it. Just wondering on your take for my own edification.<br><br>
I mean, automatically I think, "If there was some malpositioning, interventions may have caused or exacerbated that." And, "I don't know about those decels-- aren't those somewhat normal during pushing?" But I guess I'm wondering if this "bungee-jumping" phenomenon really exists, and what it's all about? Or if anyone has ever heard this line of reasoning for a C/S?
 

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One of my friends recently had a C-section for a bungee-jumping baby. She had two babies previously vaginally. When the doctor took the baby out, the cord was wrapped around his neck several times and around his body several times. So yes, it happens.
 

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Inductions can lead to or aggravate existing bad positioning.<br><br>
I'd be interested if any of the birth professionals have attended a non-induced labor and observed a "bungee" effect.
 

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I think it is possible for this to happen, and there are definitely circumstances when a c/s is needed to save the life of mom and or baby. But it sure isn't in 1/3+ of births <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rolleyes">.<br><br>
There are risks to birthing at home, just like there are <i>risks to birthing at hospitals</i>. People prefer to focus on the former and ignore the latter. In rare instances, yes, it would be better to be at the hospital. But in almost all cases of complications, you have time to get there and resolve the problem without issue. If your baby is mal-positioned and you are laboring without intervention, it will become clear after a while that the baby just isn't coming out. There may be signs of distress that the mw should be able to pick up by monitoring the hb. So, you just go to the hospital <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug">. If you're not having pitocin induced contractions, then I think the baby (in almost all cases) would handle the stress fine.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sapphire_chan</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10308133"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Inductions can lead to or aggravate existing bad positioning.<br><br>
I'd be interested if any of the birth professionals have attended a non-induced labor and observed a "bungee" effect.</div>
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Not sure about a bungee effect, but I've read several birth stories lately (written on midwive's blogs) about babies with a forehead/face presentation that were given plenty of opportunity to turn, and they all ended up at the hospital for c/s. I think two of them were here: <a href="http://observantmidwife.blogspot.com/" target="_blank">http://observantmidwife.blogspot.com/</a>
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Shanana</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10308488"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Not sure about a bungee effect, but I've read several birth stories lately (written on midwive's blogs) about babies with a forehead/face presentation that were given plenty of opportunity to turn, and they all ended up at the hospital for c/s. I think two of them were here: <a href="http://observantmidwife.blogspot.com/" target="_blank">http://observantmidwife.blogspot.com/</a></div>
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Hmm, that sounds like a different sort of issue. I think I misposted when I used "positioning". Because it's really the baby coming down in a way that doesn't let the cord get out of the way that would lead to bungeeing.<br><br>
From the few things I've read on bungeeing, it's generally a baby who's positioned correctly, but the cord is holding things back.<br><br>
Yeah, malpositions can definitely happen with uninduced labors--I was born via c-section for just that reason.
 

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Oh, yes, only once. Baby kept descending during a contraction but then bouncing right back up. HR was fine, nice and reactive. Anyway, after a looong time, mom stalled at 7cm, baby still bouncing around, we transported for no other reason than a gut feeling. Awesome transport with an awesome on-call OB and 2 nurses who had both had home births, who evaluated and said, Well, I see no reason why you can't just have this baby with a bit more time. He didn't order pitocin, deciding it was better to just wait for the baby to rotate spontaneously. Mom asked for an epidural, sat up to get it, her waters broke, and baby's hr crashed, 80's. 70's. 60's. 50's...... Turned mom, no recovery, turned mom again, no recovery. O2, knee/chest, baby still not recovering. Rush to OR for c-section. Baby had the cord <i>so</i> tight around his neck, he actually had ligature marks (like a strangulation) and petechia all over his neck and face. Poor kid looked like a Smurf. This was all about 45 minutes after we got there.<br><br>
I do know that it's <i>exceedingly</i> rare for the cord to be so tight it prevents descent or even strangles the baby. I've seen plenty born with nuchal cords 2x, 3x, and even an occassional 4x around the neck with no issues. But, yes, it does happen on a rare occassion. If this is what happened to your friends baby, could be, could be not.
 

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I have found that when there are no interventions, the labors with these babies will often slow down or lessen, allowing a little bit more time for the babies to figure out their own way.<br><br>
Also, if a baby is posterior and kicking a ton, I like to encourage moms to adopt a lot of different positions, not just those that would encourage baby to go the shortest route -- like from ROP to ROA. Sometimes babies need to go the long way to unwrap from a cord and trying to help them by encouraging forward-leaning positions actually makes it harder for them to unwind.
 

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Happened to me. My 1st DD was one push away from C/S birth. She was having serious decels with contractions and would seemingly bounce back up after each and every push. Dr wanted to avoid a C/S at all costs if possible and gave me the option of the forcepts for one last try. Thankfully they did the trick but we discovered that my DD had a tight nuchal cord x4 and was being prevented from decending by the tight cord.
 

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happened to me, too. i pushed for 3 hours, no interventions and he was just not coming down, went to hospital, ob tried to manually unwrap the cord(after an epi to relax the tissues)didnt work and ended in C. hubby said the cord was very short and wrapped twice, so in my case, i think the C was necessary.
 

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it happened to my mom too. except that she didn't have a c/s and instead had a stillbirth. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> this was 1980.
 

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Thanks, everyone. Very interesting. And Shanana, trust me, you were preaching to the choir with your response. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> I could have written that same paragraph about homebirths vs. hospital. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 
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