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Those of you who really don't use a formal type of curriculum what do you do when you make out your IHIPs? I want to be more lenient this year and was wondering how to go about it with regards to the formal side of things. I live in a state where the requirements are pretty rigid from my understanding. This will be my first IHIP too <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Thanks for any ideas!
 

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My family is part of an unschooling-friendly umbrella school program that requires us to formulate a Learning Plan each fall. I find it really easy now. Some things I've discovered that make it easier:<br><br>
Submit a list of objectives for next year that includes many of the things your child has already mastered this year. Then if things veer off in a totally different direction from what you'd expected, or if tangible progress hits a plateau, you're still fine.<br><br>
Don't promise, either to yourself or to the government, that you'll use any particular curricular resources. Instead use the phrase "resources available will include: .... "<br><br>
Use phrases like "will demonstrate mastery" rather than "will complete." That gives you the freedom to discard something or skim through it if it's unchallenging.<br><br>
Write down the natural no-brainer stuff in educational terms. If you've got a passionate reader, for instance, write down something like "Language Arts and Literature: a self-designed curriculum will consist of reading and demonstrating comprehension of a minimum of five novels at or beyond an estimated 2nd-grade reading level." Or, if you grow a backyard garden, put some education-ese to it and describe that family routine as plans for "science -- nature studies: plant and insect life cycles, habitats and interactions through long-term hands-on project work." Caring for gerbils becomes "ongoing project work in small-animal husbandry." Okay, that might be over the top, but really, you can have lots of fun with this!<br><br>
Don't forget to include outside-the-home activities in your plan too. Piano lessons can be described as "ongoing development of musical performance skills and technical mastery on the piano through ongoing study with chosen mentor(s)." Homeschool swim classes could be under PE as swimming and under socials as 'developing and participating in community' or some such thing. Visits to see Auntie Flo and the other grannies and grampas in the nursing home can be under social studies as "intergenerational outreach and community service."<br><br>
Use phrases like "self-chosen," "independently paced," "as interests dictate" and "mastery-oriented" to give yourself lots of wiggle room. They sound good in an official plan, too.<br><br>
Hope that helps!<br><br>
Miranda
 
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