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What tone of voice is best for getting your child to listen to you? LittleBear is 15 months old. She gets the gist of what I'm saying to her, but obviously thinks complying with me is optional. If there's a communication disconnect, I'm not seeing it. Nine times out of ten, I'm telling her to "get back here." I know that she has zero impulse control and that this is an age for wandering, and I make allowances for that. She has pretty much free range, but when she starts to go too far, I have to call her back to center. She's absolutely made it clear that she understands, but doesn't seem to comply unless I get stark raving mad. When she does comply, it's usually just the start of a game of sitting still for a second and taking back off in the forbidden direction, I head her off, and she changes direction laughing all the way. I hate hate hate repeating myself when it's not a matter of clarifying what I've said. She seems to respond best, initially, when I use a calm, level, authoritarian "deep voice." But that never lasts long at all.<br><br>
I'm so frustrated with her roaming, I've started restricting her play time. I just can't get anything done when she keeps wandering off. MrBook can't stand it anymore himself. I know we're all couped up, but it's too cold to get out and burn that energy off. I don't want to resort to baby containers since that'll end up even more disruptive with her whining and crying. (Is it normal for babies to whine at this age?)
 

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It is totally normal for her to see this as a game. It would be less normal if she "obeyed" at 15 mo. Her JOB is to explore! And yes, whining and crying when frustrated is totally normal.<br><br>
Can you babyproof enough so that she can roam?
 

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I'm not clear where you are expecting her to sit and remain while you get things done? It doesn't seem right that a 15mth old (or even my 4.5yr old) would want to do that? I would try and have the entire place free range rather than forbidden areas if you can and get her involved in what you are doing. From what you've written, I'm wondering if she's bored and needing more stimulation than what's offered. Sorry if I've got that all wrong, I just can't quite picture what is going on. When you say you're restricting her playtime, how does one do that when that's all they do as kids?<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"><br><br>
TBH, I don't think the issue is about your tone of voice or you having to repeat yourself or her non-compliance - but perhaps look at what your expectations are? Can you provide some more specific examples? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I agree with PP's. Room to roam is vital.<br><br>
Also I'd suggest--and I'm suggesting it because it's something I myself am working on, so I know it's hard--some "get off your butt" parenting. Meaning that when you want your child to follow a direction you've given them (for their own safety or whatever), you don't just say it and continue with whatever you were doing and then keep on repeating until you're driving yourself crazy. Instead you say it verbally and then go to your child and help them do whatever you're wanting them to do.<br><br>
For example I might say to my 2 year old "DD please step away from the TV." She doesn't move. I say "DD please step back from the TV. Can you do it by yourself or do you need me to help you?" No response. I say "OK I'll help you" then I get up go over to her and move her back from the TV. By the way sometimes she will opt to do it by herself.
 
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