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Hi there,

I am a student Midwife and I am about the embark on my first placement in the Labour Ward.

I was just wondering if any of your could convey things that you felt really helped you in your labour and birth....things the midwife said or did, gestures, bringing you a drink, brushing your hair...anything that you can think of that helped.....

Thank you....

B
 

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Congrats! I think one of the most important things would be acting as a liason between mom & MD. Not all laboring moms can stand their ground & need help having their voices heard.
 

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Confidence. My midwife exuded confidence, and as a result I felt stronger. I had intense back pain, and couldn't speak for most of my labour -- short bursts of words "water" "no" "away" etc, it was nice to have my midwife there telling me what a great job I was doing, and rubbing my leg. I really felt like she understood me -- had my dh said the same thing I would have glared at him! The best advice I can offer is to try and empathize with the mama and give her whatever support she needs!
Congrats!! I'd love to hear how it goes!!
 

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Peggy, a labor nurse or midwife or something at the hospital, was wonderful, though she made me love her and hate her at the same time.

She was wise and strong enough that it was ok to be annoying with details. For example, I had a cervical lip left and needed to lean forward to get rid of it but it hurt to do so. She insisted I do it though. She spotted tension like in my forehead and shoulders, and touched or rubbed those places to remind me to try and let it go.

Most other people did not break through my labor fog and distraction to make any impression, and certainly didn't earn my trust and attention. She did, mostly by making me feel better first. I had a couple bad habits in pushing that were really hindering it, she saw I was resisting the process and made me fix it (I was pushing with my feet against something instead of holding my legs up in a sitting squat).

Her hands were cold and not the least bit sweaty, something I really really needed. I'm sure my husband felt like crap when I told him "get your hot hands off of me" but really there was no comparison. If your hands aren't naturally cold, it might be nice for some laboring moms for you to run them under cold water.

I must have drank half a gallon of water during my 20 minutes pushing, but my husband handled that. You should make sure somebody keeps the water coming. And if they're earlier on in labor and hungry, get them some food, sneak it if you have to.

If they're having a natural birth, take more time with them than normal. Natural or not, learn their wishes and remind them to stick to them, even when things get kinda tough. And if the mom isn't up for dialoguing about something, talk to whoever's with her don't ignore them.
 
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