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Anybody here gone from having a BS in a non-nursing field to being an RN, NP, or CNM? I will graduate in May with a BS in mechanical engineering, but I want to be some kind of a nurse (thinking NP at the moment but that could change). We have a baby on the way and dh is in the military (rather will be as soon as he graduates), so this wouldn't be any time in the near future. I know I want to work part-time and not at all when my kids are babies. I've been looking at Emory's program (just b/c I live in ATL now but prob won't if/when I actually go to nursing school), and it looks like it would take 2 years for an RN and 4 for NP or CNM. Emory's website says you have to be fully immunized to work in the medical field. I am partially immunized and have no clue where my records are (neither does my mom - weird situation). Is there some way to figure out which immunizations I have? I'm 22 now and want a big family, so I might be in my thirties before I get around to doing this. It might be when dh retires from the military unless he stays in the full 20 years. My primary job will always be homemaker since he is not in a flexible career. Anyway, I'm just kind of looking for stories of other people who have done something like this. Is there any part of the program that I could take online? I have some, but not all of the prereqs (would need to get chem II, anatomy I and II, and microbiology). I'd love to do it now, but I realize I can't have everything all at the same time.
 

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You can have titers drawn to see whether or not you need more immunizations.
I'm not sure about other states, but the states I am licensed to practice in allow me to refuse some of the vaccinations that are recommended. However, some hospitals or medical centers do require them for employment, even if the state lets you refuse them.
 

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My sister did pretty much what you are thinking of. Got a BS in Biology, got married to a guy in the Coast Guard, had 2 kids 26 months apart. She went back to school when her youngest was 3 or 4. At that time her DH had a post that was flexible enough for her to go to school. She got a BSN in about 3 years. She's been working as an RN for about 3 years now, and her DH is retired after 23 years in the service. She is very pleased with how she did it. She is also considering NP school, but for now is enjoying working and making money.
 

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I'm in nursing school right now. You could apply for an accelerated BSN program (18 months here, very intense, but well worth it) if you alredy have a bachelors. And then get your NP or CNM after that.

As far as the immunizations most of us had to get titers drawn to show immunity. The main one the hospitals are going to be looking for, for the safety of their patients is rubella (especially for preg women). Hep B is usually for your safety, I was able to decline that one--I mainly work with HepC+ patients, rarely HepB+ anyways. My MMR titers and chickenpox titers all came back that I was immune. Flu shot I decline.

The good thing about nursing is you can work part time, full time, overtime, nights, days, evenings, with an agency where you set your own hours, etc etc etc. I absolutly LOVE nursing school! Have you been to allnurses.com? They have state forums you might find more info first hand from students who go to specific schools in your state. It's a great site.
 

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Well, I have a BA (History and Political Science) and a MS in Public Policy and Management, and I'm going to go back to school so I can be a RN. I have 3 kids and my DH works a lot, so I can't count on him being home. I really need to work (haven't worked in 7 years) but need the flexability that nursing will provide.

Good luck
 

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I'm a nurse, and LOVE IT! where else can a women work part time, stop working to have a baby and maternity leave say once every 18 months-2 years and jump right back in to part time work? the options for work are ENDLESS. i would also recommend you checking out a PA <physicians assistant> program, they are usually 2-3 years post graduate program. good luck!
 
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