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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,<br>
I have a question about waldorf schooling and also if anyone has any further suggestions/comments I would be grateful. I am considering changing schools for my daughter and am wondering abiout waldorf. Please give me your oipinion as to whether it might be a good fit for my daughter. As for a little background I have guardianship of a 6 year old/first grader. I am planning on adopting her and she is "my daughter" but I always feel the need to explain the guardianship etc. She has been living with me for 18 months and while she is doing very well does have some mild emotional issues...most of these are non existent at home but evident at school. She is attending a public school which I am not real happy with and wouldnt be happy with under any circumstances but especially for my daughter. It is very conformist and rule oriented... She is in trouble every day for "talking out" as the teacher calls it. They have art like once a week which means drawing a picture...nothing any more creative than that. P.E. seems to be always inside in the gym. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"> My daughter says she hates school...she says cause they only have on recess. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/bouncy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="bouncy"> She becomes very frustrated with writing sentences, math, etc. The teacher it seems only uses text books, ditto sheets etc...little to no creativity or hands on type things.<br>
My daugher is ...creative, hands on, loves music and dancing, enjoys science but not from a text book, articulate, bright, energetic, sweet, endearing...also bossy, inmature, hyper, and at school prone to crying about things when frustrated and occasionally has had a tantrum at school.
 

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There is nothing in your post that would imply that your child wouldn't be a "good fit" for Waldorf. She sounds great.<br>
Thank God, though, nothing is for everybody.<br>
You need to meet with the teacher, schedule a nice, long visit for your daughter and see how things look.<br>
Waldorf can involve some lifestyle adjustments that you may or may not like.<br>
Read the brochure...take a test drive...see how you like the ride. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks...I have gotten a brochure from the school here. The one thing I am a bit unsure about is it has a phrase at the top that goes something like....must be emotionally healthy? I suppose depending on ones expectations that could go either way for my daughter. I will go and visit though and see. There is also a money issue so time will tell.
 

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Sounds to me like the two of you would make great candidates for homeschooling, you could certainly use a Waldorf or Waldorf inspired curriculum, if you pleased. But I have no idea whether or not you would even consider that, so forgive me if that is not in your mind. It does sound like your 6 year old does not fit very well with the school she is currently at (perhaps few of the children do) and it's great that you are researching alternatives. Best wishes!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well I do not have the actual text in front of me I would have to find it. I am very alert to that sort of thing though. I did email the admissions person and explain the situation regarding my daughter...adoption, school, and cost etc. She said it would be best to ocme and speak with her in person. Which is fine I just haven't been able to yet as it is a little bit of a drive and transportation is an issue right now. I know I wouldn't be able to move her there until next school year due to the cost. The tuition is around $7,000 and they said they have financial help but it has been used up for this year. Anyway I will visit I am also looking at another private school simply because they only have 7 students in their 1st grade class.
 

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<div style="font-style:italic;">Well I do not have the actual text in front of me I would have to find it. I am very alert to that sort of thing though. I did email the admissions person and explain the situation regarding my daughter...adoption, school, and cost etc. She said it would be best to ocme and speak with her in person. Which is fine I just haven't been able to yet as it is a little bit of a drive and transportation is an issue right now. I know I wouldn't be able to move her there until next school year due to the cost. The tuition is around $7,000 and they said they have financial help but it has been used up for this year. Anyway I will visit I am also looking at another private school simply because they only have 7 students in their 1st grade class.</div>
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I agree with Riversky, homeschooling sounds like a good fit.<br>
Below is a link to homeschooling info:<br><br><a href="http://www.oakmeadow.com/resources/articles/Waldorf.htm" target="_blank">http://www.oakmeadow.com/resources/articles/Waldorf.htm</a><br><br>
Also, the tuition situation is concerning me in your case. I don't think it would be wise to expect that next year you would be reciving tuition assistance. Lots and lots of families typically apply for tuition assistance and priorities are (at many schools) given to families with several children enrolled and who are Anthroposophists. You could get it, but I wouldn't count on it.<br><br>
In describing the public school your daughter attends you said "It is very conformist and rule oriented... She is in trouble every day for "talking out" as the teacher calls it. They have art like once a week which means drawing a picture...nothing any more creative than that."<br><br>
You could be describing a Waldorf school here. She will probably have art class more often, but she won't have the freedom of expression in her artwork that she currently enjoys. She will have to draw exactly what everyone else is drawing at the same time. The creativity you are talking about just isn't there. Also, there is very little about Waldorf that is non-conformist - it is typically very rule-oriented and authoritarian. You should ask about this at the school.<br><br>
Good luck to you and your daughter. I hope you find the right fit for her and for your family.<br><br>
Pete
 

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In Waldorf school, your child should learn how to be creative. This often doesn't involve drawing/painting what she wants.<br>
I'm sure Verrocchio was aware of Leonardo's talents, but Leonardo did what was asked of him for quite some time. An apprenticeship is part of an artistic training.<br>
And your child has as much chance of drawing "exactly" what another child draws as she does finding another child with the same fingerprints.<br>
I'm often confused about how tuition assistance money gets "used up".<br>
There is no actual money, it's just how much the school decides to not get.<br>
Much of this depends on how full a class is.<br>
If a class can have 30 children and there are 12, the idea of assistance being "used up" is absurd.<br>
Speak to the teacher.<br>
None of us like empty seats.<br>
And, as far as tuition assistance going to families who already have children enrolled...well...of course. You would get that consideration for your 2nd and 3rd children.
 

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Waldorf isn't an "unschool". It isn't a self-led education, it's a teacher-led education. It is not authoritarian, but it is authoritative--not a democracy. And it is not at all conformist, not in my experience. Each child is very much their own person, extraordinarily so to me, based on my observation and experience at other schools. I'm struck by this everytime I'm with a group of Waldorf students. Even my children's closest friends are very different people from my own children.<br><br>
In Waldorf, the students are given instructions, guidelines, and assignments in art and drawing, which for some reason I do-not-understand is confused with an interference with free expression. When I was in school, we had art lessons by a *real* artist and she taught art with instructions, guidelines, and assignments. It was not a <i>do-your-own-thing</i>, it was a <i>today-we're-going-to-learn-to-do-this</i>. That's how artists teach art technique. I have so many trained artists in my family. My son-in-law is a professional, my almost daughter-in-law is graduating with a BA in art and will be entering a credential program to become an art teacher. My own older children have taken tons of art, including at the local public school which did have an excellent art program until their gifted art teacher left the school. They also studied it in college, my older son minoring in art. Waldorf teaches art just like *most* real art teachers teach it.<br><br>
And l completely agree with waldorfteacher. The child's individuality shines through, and it <i>really</i> stands out as the children get older and have developed more mastery of technique. The art lessons empower creativity and self-expression, not stifle it.<br><br>
But aside from the direct instruction in art, Waldorf does have ample opportunities for students to 'do your own thing' too. My Waldorf children kind of take the art for granted, they don't realize they have so much more in school than most students. But their classmates who've transferred from other schools, they think of Waldorf schools as a kind of art heaven. And there are so many real life professional artists in the parent body, one of my closest friends here is a former middle and high school art teacher in the public school. I'm surprised, actually, that the art instruction in Waldorf stirs any controversy.<br><br>
Linda
 
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