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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for some information from those who have experienced a c-section about life afterwards. (I'm still facing a section if the placenta doesn't move, and I just want to know as much as possible).<br><br>
So, here are my questions (while I realize that everyone's experience is unique, I'm interested in hearing yours):<br>
1> Is there the normal postpartum bleeding after a section?<br>
2> How long before you were up and around?<br>
3> Are there things to do before hand to make a section easier?<br>
4> Any hints about the recovery period would be helpful.<br>
5> And building off of #4 - is there equipment or items that I should have around the house to make recovery after the section easier? (I'm thinking the equivalent of the squirt bottle for washing the perineal area after tearing or an episiotomy.<br><br>
Anything else that you might want to add?
 

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I had an emergency c-section just over two weeks ago and I'm up and around already. In fact, I was up and around the same day...but I'm stubborn that way<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Duck">:<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
postpartum bleeding: yes. Mine was fairly heavy the first few days and it's gradually tapered off. However, if you overdo it, it will come back. That's a sign to sit down and knock it off.<br><br>
Up and around: like I said, I was up and around the same day - however no heavy lifting, no housework - laundry, vaccuuming- basically no anything that uses your abdominal muscles for the first week/two weeks. That's a little tougher. However with my hubby and DS13 in the house, it wasn't so bad. They were lifesavers.<br><br>
to make things easier beforehand: I don't know actually. My section was a surprise.<br><br>
Recovery period: two to three weeks of taking it easy. No sex for 6 weeks. Keep kegeling! Seriously....it works your abs too. Utilize your yoga ball. Sitting on it helps with your core strengthening. Great for your abs, again.<br><br>
Extra equipment: I love love love my grabber. You know the things on a stick that have a little hand at the end that you use for grabbing things off the floor or top cupboard or what have you? GET ONE. So awesome! Total lifesaver.<br><br>
Hmmm...I think that's it...I'll add more if I think of anything.
 

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I had an unplanned c-section with my first. He was born around 7 pm and they had me up and moving first thing the next morning.<br><br>
Having only had a c-section, I guess the bleeding is "normal." I can't remember exactly how long the lochia lasted but I know it was over by my 6 week post-partum check-up. As far as the incision, I had a tiny bit of blood and crusties I had to clean off during the first day or two.<br><br>
Mine was unplanned so no advice on pre-planning. Maybe just familiarize yourself with the procedure and the hospital's policies beforehand so that there are no surprises. For example, our hospital allows baby and partner to be with mom in recovery so I was only seperated from my son for the time it took to stitch me up. I know a guy who's wife just had a c-section at another hospital and mom had to wait in the recovery room on her own.<br><br>
My only advice about recovery is to take the pain meds! I tried to make it by on just ibuprofen but it was too much. Actually, I only needed the strong stuff for the first couple of days. After that, OTC pain medication got me through. I was most uncomfortable when I had post-feeding uterine contractions so I quickly learned to take a few extra minutes after breastfeeding to keep my feet up and try to relax through them.<br><br>
Ice packs for the incision are wonderful. I would make sure any bathing products you plan to use initially are fragrance free so as not to irritate the incision when you shower. For breastfeeding, I used a Boppy and that kept my son comfortably off of my incision. I've read that using the football hold for breastfeeding works well for a lot of c-section moms but I never got the hang of it.
 

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Check out the C-section stickies over at Birth & Beyond - lots of great info there including several birth plans tailored for surgical births. The support threads in B&B are pretty good - good information and it helps to have a place to share your feelings. There's a huge thread in FYT called "All Children By C-Section" that again has lots of very good information, but it's huge and some of the support aspects of it may not be what you are looking for. There's a c-section thread over in personal growth that covers the emotional aspects of recovery that may be useful for you.<br><br>
HTH!
 

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I've never had a section, but I would suggest taking extra pillows to the hospital for propping up the babe and yourself during breastfeeding. I've attended some hospital births where they just didn't have enough pillows.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>ColesMommy</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9911145"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I know a guy who's wife just had a c-section at another hospital and mom had to wait in the recovery room on her own.</div>
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That was like the hospital I was at.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">My only advice about recovery is to take the pain meds! I tried to make it by on just ibuprofen but it was too much. Actually, I only needed the strong stuff for the first couple of days. After that, OTC pain medication got me through.</td>
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YES! Agreed 100%!<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">For breastfeeding, I used a Boppy and that kept my son comfortably off of my incision. I've read that using the football hold for breastfeeding works well for a lot of c-section moms but I never got the hang of it.</td>
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Loves my boppy! And I can't get the football hold either...not for lack of trying...oy...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the replies - you ladies are wonderful!<br><br>
I'm still hoping for a natural birth, but it's good to get information about the worst case scenarios so I know what to expect if things don't change with the placenta.<br><br>
Nausicamom - thanks for the links - I had no idea those threads were around already!
 

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Do some cooking beforehand and freeze. Collect menus of local restaurants so people can bring you dinner or you can have a friend/family go pick up dinner. Make a grocery list that someone else can go off of including the locations of items if necessary (i.e. aisle numbers) Be specific so they know what you like. Have comfort food on hand. Be prepared to live on one floor of your house if you are not comfortable walking up steps. Ask friends if they can be on standby to drive you afterwards since you are not supposed to drive for a few weeks.<br><br>
I used a maternity or post surgical girdle belt and it was a lifesaver. It holds everything in place with super strong elastic when your abs are just not able to do so on their own. The hospital gave me mine. It wraps around you and secures with velcro.<br><br>
One thing I wish I could have been prepared for was the gas and intestinal pain that I had after surgery. If you know you are having a c-section, I might ask my doctor about foods to avoid in the days before the surgery to prevent gas. From what they told me at the hospital, it seems like your intestines sort of stop moving food along after surgery as a reaction. The food that is in there produces gas and it all gets stuck since you are not moving around at all.<br><br>
Also, I had a marginal placenta previa and just got the news today that it has moved so there IS hope, keep thinking positively, but you are doing the right thing to plan and prepare for a c-section.
 

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1> Is there the normal postpartum bleeding after a section? <span style="color:#800080;">Yes, but for me it was a bit lighter and didn't last as long as it did for my vaginal births.</span><br><br>
2> How long before you were up and around?<span style="color:#800080;">I had him around 4:30pm and they had me up and moving around the next morning. That first day was hard but it got better pretty quickly.</span><br><br>
3> Are there things to do before hand to make a section easier?<span style="color:#800080;">Mine was an emergency (due to a placental abruption) but it would have been nice to have had some meals frozen and have the grocery shopping done.</span><br><br>
4> Any hints about the recovery period would be helpful.<span style="color:#800080;">Don't eat any foods that will make you gassy!! And have some anti-gas medicine in the house just in case. I foolishly ate burritos (non-bean) and the gas under my incision was the worst pain of the whole experience.</span><br><br>
5> And building off of #4 - is there equipment or items that I should have around the house to make recovery after the section easier? (I'm thinking the equivalent of the squirt bottle for washing the perineal area after tearing or an episiotomy. <span style="color:#800080;">Comfy pants and granny panties. You aren't going to want anything to rub on the incision for a while. Also DVD's or books. You'll be in bed a lot and while I spent most of the time staring at my son a little mindless entertainment was nice too. While I could get up and around pretty well, after the first couple days, I'd get tired and have to give my abdominal muscles a rest.</span><br><br>
Anything else that you might want to add?[/QUOTE]<span style="color:#800080;">Definitely bring a Boppy. Nursing would have been much harder without it. I even would keep it on sometimes if my other kids were sitting in bed with me to protect my incision from any crazy kid movements. My 2 year old at the time accidentally pressed on my incision with his hand once and it was not a good feeling.<br><br>
While it was a much harder recovery than my vaginal births it wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. By 3 weeks I was feeling good and by 6 weeks I was feeling great.</span>
 

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1> Is there the normal postpartum bleeding after a section? <span>I found that I had much less bleeding after my first section than after my vaginal delivery. The bleeding after my second section was comparable to the bleeding after the vaginal.</span><br><br>
2> How long before you were up and around? <span>After the first, I was up and around sans pain medication in about 5 days. The second, recovery was more painful and I was still using pain medication, but able to resume most normal activities with slight limitations (i.e. I couldn't spend all day at it) in about a week and a half.</span><br><br>
3> Are there things to do before hand to make a section easier? <span>my first was an emergency section, and it couldn't have gone better but I don't really know why. With the second, I wussed out on a vbac <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Duck">: and found that things sucked more. A lot of women say that going into labor makes recovery after a section easier, but in my experience the opposite was true. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"></span><br><br>
4> Any hints about the recovery period would be helpful. <span>Stay on top of your pain management. I'm not advising you to take the max doses of everything, just to take the pills before the pain starts. I had great luck alternating opiates with motrin; You may need more or less. Just don't wait for the pain to start to take the pills, and taper off slowly so that you can know for certain that you're able to handle things. Being left high and dry and waiting for your percocet to kick in so that you can breathe again is not conducive to a happy bonding time with your new little person. (I speak from experience. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shake.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shake">)</span><br><br>
5> And building off of #4 - is there equipment or items that I should have around the house to make recovery after the section easier? (I'm thinking the equivalent of the squirt bottle for washing the perineal area after tearing or an episiotomy. <span>Old lady underpants. I don't know what kind you generally wear, but as a short person I've always found bikinis to be the most comfortable because they don't come up to my neck. After my first section, I found that I could not wear my underpants because the elastic rested right against my incision-- OUCH!!! When I went to Walmart, I was screwed, and I had to buy men's underpants because they were out of old-lady underwear in my size. This was fine, because the painfully wide between-the-legs parts seemed as though they were made to accomodate post-partum mamma cloth, but I was irritated at the time. Of all the things I wish someone had said about c-sections, that tops the list. It's one of those things that I've never seen or read anywhere other than my own posts here and in my blog, so please disseminate that bit of info-- you WILL want old-lady underpants, even if you're a thong-wearer by nature. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br><br>
Stool softener = life saver. I also really like those metamucil cookies; They're convinient and really, really helpful especially after a c-section. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/nod.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="nod"><br><br>
Sleeping and moving afterwards can really mess you up, so make certain you are as comfortable as possible before you pass out. Going back to the recovery period, make sure that you have access to any pain medications and some water when you fall asleep, and take a motrin when you wake up to nurse the baby. It helps SO much not to wake up in agony because you've gone too long without any pain management. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/nod.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="nod"></span>
 
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