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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well since I've been spending alot of time lately sitting around with this limb or that limb up and iced, I've been wondering a bit about the common answer to injuries.

Actually it was sparked at my doc's office when getting my broken wrist looked and and I'm pondering it now as I sit here with ice on my sprained ankle. A little "health news" tv program at the doc's office suggested that there may be new evidence to suggest not giving anti-inflammatory drugs to injuries (such as breaks/ sprains) because the inflammation is actually part of the healing process and that reducing the inflammation would be lessening the chances of all the healing elements carried in the blood to get to the affected part and do its work..

So as I sit here icing my ankle, I wonder about that. The ice certainly helps the pain and reduces the swelling. But is that the best idea? I reckon too much swelling would be a bad thing, but is some swelling good? If elevation is to keep too much blood/fluids from rushingto the affected area,, is that really the best methodof healing?

inother words, what are some alternative means (if any) of healing these sort of injuries?? are there other theories out there?
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Teenytoona View Post
Well since I've been spending alot of time lately sitting around with this limb or that limb up and iced, I've been wondering a bit about the common answer to injuries.

Actually it was sparked at my doc's office when getting my broken wrist looked and and I'm pondering it now as I sit here with ice on my sprained ankle. A little "health news" tv program at the doc's office suggested that there may be new evidence to suggest not giving anti-inflammatory drugs to injuries (such as breaks/ sprains) because the inflammation is actually part of the healing process and that reducing the inflammation would be lessening the chances of all the healing elements carried in the blood to get to the affected part and do its work..

So as I sit here icing my ankle, I wonder about that. The ice certainly helps the pain and reduces the swelling. But is that the best idea? I reckon too much swelling would be a bad thing, but is some swelling good? If elevation is to keep too much blood/fluids from rushingto the affected area,, is that really the best methodof healing?

inother words, what are some alternative means (if any) of healing these sort of injuries?? are there other theories out there?
Subbing ... I've been working on reducing the swelling in my knee due to a torn meniscus for 5+ weeks now, so this is very interesting to consider. My dh and chiropractor (who is doing my rehab) both feel strongly that icing is needed, but I have never considered the idea that the swelling actually allows healing elements to reach the injury. Hmm ...
 

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When I brought DD1 into the ER last year for a broken wrist, they said NOT to give Ibuprofin, because it keeps the bones from healing fully. When she broke (the same) wrist a couple months ago I asked at this ER (different state) and they said they'd never heard of such a thing.....

Traumeel (comes in gel or ointment) helps. My sprained ankle in July took until September to heal and I did Traumeel and RICE. It wasn't until I put the air cast on it recommended by the orthopedist, whom I went to because it was still painful to walk on two months later, that it finally got better (though it took a few weeks of immobilization). But I'm wondering about the elevation now too... don't you want the blood to go there to help it heal? And the swelling prevents you from using it right away, so that has a purpose too. Hmmm....
 

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I don't ice things unless I"m in intense pain & then I use cold patches.

However, I'm also in physiotherapy for letting things get too bad.lol

My PT uses ultrasound on my ankle & foot to get rid of the swelling. it works better & faster at getting rid of swelling and promoting healing than pain meds or creams.
 

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I don't use any ibuprofen or acetaminophen; we do employ arnica and/or traumeel for swelling/pain. My chiro has been doing ultrasound and/or cold laser, but I'm not sure if either is helping my knee. My SIL just had knee surgery and she said that ice really helped her feel like she was healing (it's all unsure though because the surgery itself might not have been successful). But with almost constant ice, she never needed pain pills and had very reduced swelling much more quickly. Now, if that is a good thing it seems remains to be seen.
 

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As a massage therapist, I have thought alot about this. The new RICE is actually PIER (Pressure Ice Elevation Rest) just changing the priority level, indicating that 100% rest is not useful. But the rest (PIE) still focuses on reducing swelling.
As I see it, alot of swelling is very painful, very very painful, and anything naturally available to reduce that seems to make sense - if you were out in the woods, you might plunge and injured limb into an icy cold creek for relief, or put snow on it. But I think then the aim should be to *reduce* swelling for *comfort*, not entirely get rid of it.
And of course if you use heavier pain relief - medications - you may not realize how much you are hurt and cause further harm by *not resting*. Again, resting *too much* definitely has drawbacks - you need to keep the limb functioning - but too much pain relief will result in not being aware of your body's natural signals.

Oh, one more thing to add: if you ice according to good instructions, you actually DO encourage blood flow in & out of the area: that is, ice on 10 minutes, ice off 10 minutes, alternating. Or there is another therapy where you apply icy cold water for a long period, waiting for burning, aching, then numbness reactions - blood flow will heavily be brought into the are then. This one should be used with great caution though, you can easily overdo it. And honestly, it's very uncomfortable!!
Not the most clear or definite answer, I know, but that's my thoughts!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by Limabean1975 View Post
As a massage therapist, I have thought alot about this. The new RICE is actually PIER (Pressure Ice Elevation Rest) just changing the priority level, indicating that 100% rest is not useful. But the rest (PIE) still focuses on reducing swelling.
As I see it, alot of swelling is very painful, very very painful, and anything naturally available to reduce that seems to make sense - if you were out in the woods, you might plunge and injured limb into an icy cold creek for relief, or put snow on it. But I think then the aim should be to *reduce* swelling for *comfort*, not entirely get rid of it.
And of course if you use heavier pain relief - medications - you may not realize how much you are hurt and cause further harm by *not resting*. Again, resting *too much* definitely has drawbacks - you need to keep the limb functioning - but too much pain relief will result in not being aware of your body's natural signals.

Oh, one more thing to add: if you ice according to good instructions, you actually DO encourage blood flow in & out of the area: that is, ice on 10 minutes, ice off 10 minutes, alternating. Or there is another therapy where you apply icy cold water for a long period, waiting for burning, aching, then numbness reactions - blood flow will heavily be brought into the are then. This one should be used with great caution though, you can easily overdo it. And honestly, it's very uncomfortable!!
Not the most clear or definite answer, I know, but that's my thoughts!

OOh very interesting information. Alot of what you said makes sense. I don't know a whole lot about physical injuries as this. Thanks for your input!
 
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