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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I am pretty sure this was caused by letting my daughter eat some yogurt that should have been on her no, no list but I have to make sure I am not ignoring something important.<br><br>
My daughter has shown a big sensitivity to red food dye and at about 20 months old she started having these crazy uncharacteristic tantrums and rage attacks. I found out about feingold and I took her off of food dye and artificial flavors. We haven't gone completely feingold but we try to avoid most processed food.<br><br>
She has been begging and begging for yogurt. So, last week I bought her lemon and orange cream the only two that don't appear to have artificial coloring. Mind you, in the past she only responded to red#40. Well, she has been gorging on yogurt all week, eating about 1 jar a day, sometimes 1 1/2. Well this evening she had a total rage attack. It was for an hour and it was the most terrifying experience. She goes completely primal. At one point she was even growling because she couldn't scream anymore. My husband had to leave the house because he couldn't remain calm. She would scream and scream for me to leave her alone but if I moved an inch away from her she would scream and scream for me not to leave. Finally, I just used the holding technique and held her still against her will. If this hadn't of happened before we would have taken her to the ER. It is beyond scary to see a child like that.<br><br>
I should have seen this coming. She hasn't slept well for the last 3 nights. She's been unable to fall asleep before 11:00 pm. Normal bedtime is 7:30 or 8:00.<br><br>
Are there any medical conditions that I need to worry about. She doesn't seem to display any other characteristics that are concerning and she is a completely normal toddler with normal frustration/anger levels when one of these isn't happening. This is the first time we've had a rage attack since we removed food dye from her diet when she was 20 months. (She is almost 25 months now).
 

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Its very possible its dairy or something in the yogurt. Based on your description, it sure sounds like it to me. Our DD is 25 mths and has recently begun reacting to dairy after having been able to tolerate it for the last year. So I guess these things can start suddenly. Its also common to crave the very foods that cause a bad reaction. DD is obsessed with cheese and ice cream, and wants to eat butter straight, in big chunks from the stick.<br><br>
Sometimes people who react to dairy can tolerate homemade yogurt that has been cultured for 24 hours. But storebought yogurt is rarely properly cultured.
 

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Since they were orange in color, did they have tartrazine in them? That's yellow dye #5 (or yellow lake #5). Some people can have serious reactions to it. Sometimes it's even used to make orange fruits "oranger." Silly and dangerous. But, the term doesn't sound like an artificial color. On the other hand, annatto is an orange dye that is natural and is used to dye foods like cheese (e.g. Muenster).<br><br><i>Some researchers have linked tartrazine to childhood Obsessive Compulsive & Hyperactive Disorder [5]. If a parent suspects their child may be adversely affected by tartrazine the parent should consider an all organic diet for a few weeks, avoid all tartrazine-containing skin products and monitor the child’s behavior.</i> <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tartrazine" target="_blank">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tartrazine</a>
 

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Yikes mama! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br>
Lack of sleep will definitely cause rage issues along with food disturbances. I've seen in my DS many many times when he was suffering from digestive upset. Your gut makes your neurotransmitters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Imvishta</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7321452"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Since they were orange in color, did they have tartrazine in them? That's yellow dye #5 (or yellow lake #5). Some people can have serious reactions to it. Sometimes it's even used to make orange fruits "oranger." Silly and dangerous. But, the term doesn't sound like an artificial color. On the other hand, annatto is an orange dye that is natural and is used to dye foods like cheese (e.g. Muenster).<br><br><i>Some researchers have linked tartrazine to childhood Obsessive Compulsive & Hyperactive Disorder [5]. If a parent suspects their child may be adversely affected by tartrazine the parent should consider an all organic diet for a few weeks, avoid all tartrazine-containing skin products and monitor the child’s behavior.</i> <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tartrazine" target="_blank">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tartrazine</a></div>
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This particular orange yogurt had annato in it, so I figured we were safe with this one. I definitely stick away from tartrazine and all other color # anythings. We know for sure that she is super sensitive to red#40. But now we've got to consider what else is at play.<br><br>
Sensitivity to dairy may be a possibility. She seemed to tolerate organic vanilla yogurt just fine, a few months ago. However, she just wants flavor in it and I have been to lazy to make our own. My friend is going to teach me how to make our own yogurt now and we will see how she does with that. I am also looking into switching to raw dairy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>BellinghamCrunchie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7321388"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Its very possible its dairy or something in the yogurt. Based on your description, it sure sounds like it to me. Our DD is 25 mths and has recently begun reacting to dairy after having been able to tolerate it for the last year. So I guess these things can start suddenly. Its also common to crave the very foods that cause a bad reaction. DD is obsessed with cheese and ice cream, and wants to eat butter straight, in big chunks from the stick.<br><br>
Sometimes people who react to dairy can tolerate homemade yogurt that has been cultured for 24 hours. But storebought yogurt is rarely properly cultured.</div>
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thank you for this and my friend and I are wondering if it is something in the yogurt in general. She is suspecting her own daughter's recent behavior may also be tied to yogurt. She removed all dairy recently and her daughter has become much better but in retrospect after our conversations about my daughter she realized her daughter's outburts were only after eating yogurt. Her daughter, on the other hand, was eating stuff like gogurt. I hardly know how children can eat that stuff and not have a reation, LOL.<br><br>
The cultured thing is very interesting. I don't think I would have considered that aspect on my own. I am still very new to learning about food and its nutritional properties as I was brought up to believe mass marketing crap. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>thehappyhippo</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7324825"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">This particular orange yogurt had annato in it, so I figured we were safe with this one. I definitely stick away from tartrazine and all other color # anythings. We know for sure that she is super sensitive to red#40. But now we've got to consider what else is at play.<br><br>
Sensitivity to dairy may be a possibility. She seemed to tolerate organic vanilla yogurt just fine, a few months ago. However, she just wants flavor in it and I have been to lazy to make our own. My friend is going to teach me how to make our own yogurt now and we will see how she does with that. I am also looking into switching to raw dairy.</div>
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Wow! That's rough. It's hard enough to figure out all the dyes with all the different names they use. My DS seemed to get a little hyper from some Dannon strawberry yogurt DH bought, but I wasn't sure if it was from the dye or the sugar. We're giving him Stoneyfield Yo Baby now.<br><br>
Just wanted to add that there are some pretty bad dyes in some children's vitamins. You probably already know that, though.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>JaneS</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7323418"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Yikes mama! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br>
Lack of sleep will definitely cause rage issues along with food disturbances. I've seen in my DS many many times when he was suffering from digestive upset. Your gut makes your neurotransmitters.</div>
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I'd like to look up more information on this issue (your gut makes your neurotransmitters) for myself. How would I search for it? Thanks.
 

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My son couldn't tolerate any dairy, including yogurt, for a long time. He would have episodes just like you describe, beginning from when we first offered him whole cows' milk around 13 months old. So for a few years we gave him soy yogurt which didn't seem to bother him. Around age 3 he went through a period of having lots more behavior issues, tantrums just like you describe. We did a STRICT elimination diet for about 5-6 weeks--no wheat, dairy, soy, corn, or food dyes. We were prepared to stay on that diet if it helped, but we took him off it temporarily so that he could have allergy testing. Now here's the bizarre part. Once we put him back on a "regular" diet, including even dairy, all his behavior issues went away. We are all a bit puzzled about what exactly happened. But he can eat anything now and he does not throw tantrums anymore. My theory is he had some chronic gut issues from infancy that got a chance to heal during the 5-6 weeks we were so strict about his diet. Once he'd recovered, he could tolerate the foods that previously caused his freak-outs. I've been told that healing a damaged gut would never happen so fast, but I don't know how else to account for it.<br><br>
Good luck figuring out how to help your daughter...food sensitivities are a real challenge to figure out and cope with.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Imvishta</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7325497"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'd like to look up more information on this issue (your gut makes your neurotransmitters) for myself. How would I search for it? Thanks.</div>
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What little I know started with Karen DeFelice's books and her site<br><a href="http://www.enzymestuff.com/rtsensorygut.htm" target="_blank">http://www.enzymestuff.com/rtsensorygut.htm</a> from the perspective of ASDs, allergies, digestive function and using digestive enzymes. If there is gut damage and/or food allergies, you are not breaking down your proteins into correct amino acids/neurotransmitters and that has a number of effects on the body.<br><br>
Also <a href="http://www.alternativementalhealth.com/" target="_blank">http://www.alternativementalhealth.com/</a> is an interesting place I've just discovered, there is several articles on amino acid therapy and neurotransmitters.<br><br>
Start by googling 'leaky gut and neurotransmitters'. The autism community has been at forefront of trying to understand this connection with dysbiosis, mood and the gluten/casein opiate effect. It was in trying to understand my DS's issues I've found out more about my own!<br><a href="http://osiris.sunderland.ac.uk/autism/gut.htm" target="_blank">http://osiris.sunderland.ac.uk/autism/gut.htm</a><br><br><i>The Mood Cure</i> by Julia Ross is about using amino acid therapy for moods and directly connects adequate protein in the diet to amino acid levels in the body. She has a bibliography too. She has several different mood types (Dark Cloud, The Blahs, Stressed Out, Too Sensitive) signalling which nutrient therapy is indicated. She doesn't talk about gut damage, but just tthe lack of correct amino acids to produce the neurotransmitters that greatly effect mood.
 

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Wow Wednesday! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/banana.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="banana"> That is very interesting! You must have been thrilled. Kids are pretty resilent once you get on the right track. In our case we've made enormous progress in a short time too once we knew what we were doing. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/nut.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="nut"><br><br>
I'd theorize that his gut healed up, the inflammation went down, the villi regrew and he started producing adequate enzymes and digesting his foods properly again. And thus not provoking allergic reactions b/c the proteins were being broken down as they should.
 

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I am BEYOND thrilled that my son no longer has these unbelievably stressful behavior episodes, AND that he can eat basically anything. It was really the last thing I expected. I still don't let him have milk by the glass, or ice cream--I just don't dare to go there--but he has cheese and yogurt pretty regularly now, and we don't see any kind of reaction. Where before, if he had say a couple bites of cheese pizza, the entire next day would be screaming misery from sunup to sunset.
 
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