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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the camp of "it'll happen when it happens", but I just realized a fellow homeschool friend's dd can't read. She's 9. Is that normal? Will she eventually learn? I am not sure anyone is teaching her- they are *very* relaxed. Ds was in public/private school until 2nd grade so he learned at school, and I haven't gotten there yet with the twins. So I don't have a frame of reference to know when to worry if they aren't reading yet.<br><br>
She's a bright girl who clearly wants to learn as much as she can. She hasn't been diagnosed with any reading disorders.
 

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Does she get read to? Does she ever try to sound out short words? Does she know her alphabet? Does she have phonics computer games?<br><br>
Mine all read at 8 or 9 yrs. Oldest dd knew her alphabet and the sound each letter made at 18 mos. But she didn't read early b/c she cared more about the story and once she got to be a certain age, she didn't want to read little kids books, she wanted me to read her chapter books. She would try to sound things out but get bogged down in the sounds and lose the meaning. But she woke up on her 9th birthday and could read anything! Really! It was like some connection in her brain just connected and that was that.<br><br>
We had her tested a couple weeks later and she was reading and comprehending at 9th grade level. She basically went from 1st month of 1st grade to 9th grade overnight. It totally rocked. A big I told you so to my mom, a 1st grade teacher.<br><br>
Ds learned to read by playing certain computer and video games. He also learned to write and spell that way.<br><br>
We did have a little phonics book set, but I am sure they would have learned without it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't know about any of that stuff. We only see them at church, though it is for hours at a time. I found out accidentally. Your post made me feel better. I was starting to wonder if I should broach the subject with Mom and offer to tutor. I just don't want such a bright girl to feel left out or less than because she can't do something her peers can.
 

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It can be normal, but at the same time it could be a hidden learning issue.<br>
Ha!! not the answer you wanted to read.<br><br>
Being to relax can miss issues that hamper reading. But over worried can cause to much stress on parent and child.
 

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My two oldest struggled to learn to read in public school. My oldest finally became fluent around age 8 and then quickly advanced above his grade level. My middle child is why we began homeschooling. He developed a severe reading phobia in the beginning of 1st grade. It got so bad that he would actually throw a book if he thought someone was expecting him to read it. Once I brought him home to school, we completely backed off requiring him to read. There was still alot of reading go on to him and around him, but there were no expectation what so ever that he read. Low and behold shortly before his 8th birthday, I "caught" him reading a Magic Treehouse book. Now, a couple months later, he is obsessed with Calvin and Hobbs. He is working easily in a 3rd grade reading curriculum (he never did a second grade curriculum) and would probably do well in a 4th or 5th grade, but I don't see any reason to push it.
 

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My oldest didn't read until age 8 and she was in public school. They put her in reading recovery, sent her to summer school, the whole 9 yards and it made no difference. Well, it made her feel stupid <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: , but it didn't help with the reading. Apparently she had to be 8 <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> What she mostly learned was that she was bad at reading and that she didn't like to do it. My DH was a late reader too, again despite tons of intervention. My youngest is 6 (7 in December) and not reading. I am not panicking (really I'm not, OK maybe a little <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/yikes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="EEK!"> ) because he comes from a family of late readers. My main concern is not making him feel as if he is *behind* and instead left to his own timetable.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>3momkmb</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My oldest didn't read until age 8 and she was in public school. They put her in reading recovery, sent her to summer school, the whole 9 yards and it made no difference. Well, it made her feel stupid <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: , but it didn't help with the reading. Apparently she had to be 8 <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> What she mostly learned was that she was bad at reading and that she didn't like to do it.</div>
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Wow. Really similar story at our house. My oldest then left ps at 9 y/o and refused to read for a really long time. Then he picked up a couple of Magic Tree House books, read video game screens, and a couple of comic books. Then when he was 13 he was suddenly reading adult-level books.<br><br>
I have to wonder how many reading problems are diagnosed when really, the kids just weren't ready to read yet, and, given some extra time, would learn without the diagnosis and "special help," yk?
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lurk.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lurk">:<br><br>
interested in hearing more on this. My dd is in 3rd gr. at public school and they are starting to worry that she is 'well' below grade level in reading and math (she just got 15/18 correct on a skelatal science test but 2/15 on a spelling quiz).<br>
I'm really now starting to relax about it. I've told them from day one that she will learn to read when she wants to! All this pressure (which rubs off on us! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: )<br>
Blah. She is just bored in school, the math esp. I've been thinking of taking her out. Only she loves the social part of school. She wants to HS but wants her friends daily too. But, I don't want her to feel stupid either. Something schools are very good at making kids like mine feel!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This is all good to know *before* the twins reach this age and have any issues with reading. I taught myself to read when I was 4 and am an obsessed reader now. Ds was starting to read at 4, but of course learned in K5 in ps. Now he hated reading and just now is starting to read for pleasure on his own (he loves to be read to, but it took 11 years for him to pick up a book voluntarily and read). After reading this thread, I hopefully won't freak if the twins follow a different path.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Joan</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Wow. Really similar story at our house. My oldest then left ps at 9 y/o and refused to read for a really long time. Then he picked up a couple of Magic Tree House books, read video game screens, and a couple of comic books. Then when he was 13 he was suddenly reading adult-level books.</div>
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My DD didn't pick up a book for years after leaving public school. It was Series of Unfortunate Events the finally persuaded her to read, she couldn't wait for me to read the next chapter so she picked up the book and read it herself. Now at 12yo she is reading a book about Marie Antoinette, Harry Potter 4 (again) and The Roman Ransom.<br><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Joan</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I have to wonder how many reading problems are diagnosed when really, the kids just weren't ready to read yet, and, given some extra time, would learn without the diagnosis and "special help," yk</div>
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I brought that point up on an educational debate board (not a MDC board) and was promptly lambasted. I was told that problems *must be caught early* and how late readers *consistently get left behind* if the *problem is not addressed* <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/blahblah.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="blah blah"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/blahblah.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="blah blah"> The general consensus seemed to be that I was *lucky* that DD caught up on her own and that she was the exception to the rule. I tend to think the kids with actual problems are the exception to the rule. Especially if you are talking about kids who aren't reading by the end of K (which is when they decided my DD had a *problem*).
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>3momkmb</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I brought that point up on an educational debate board (not a MDC board) and was promptly lambasted. I was told that problems *must be caught early* and how late readers *consistently get left behind* if the *problem is not addressed* <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/blahblah.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="blah blah"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/blahblah.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="blah blah"></div>
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The only things that "catching and addressing the problem early" accomplished here was that ds started thinking he was too dumb to be able to read, and he lost his enthusiasm for learning. While reading specialists were drilling him, his classroom teacher was claiming he was lazy and just not trying. UGH! I could go on and on. All that "help" did nothing to improve his reading ability.<br><br>
Sadly, kids in school DO get left behind. They get left behind because school is not set up to honor their individual rates of development. If a child isn't reading fluently by 2nd grade, they can't do the assignments they're given, so they get lower grades and it's all downhill from there. But it's not the child who has the problem, it's the system, imo.<br><br>
Homeschooled kids don't need to fit themselves into any outside system, so some of them read later than we're used to seeing, and it makes some of us nervous because it's such a detour from what we're used to. But, it's okay.<br><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">The general consensus seemed to be that I was *lucky* that DD caught up on her own and that she was the exception to the rule.</td>
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Don't you hate that, "They're just lucky" cop-out? Seems no matter what I say about how things work in our family, someone comes along and tells me, it's just because I'm lucky, and that for anyone else, it would be disasterous. Eh, whatever.
 

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My DS is 7 1/2 and he has some of the basics down. He just really isn't interested right now. He is a very visual learner and would rather watch a video or listen to me read to him and look at the pictures.<br><br>
I know, he will learn to read. We do plenty of reading games and get exposure that way.
 

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Just do like potty traing, tell them show them help them...But let them tell and show you when they are ready...Dont rush them...The'll pick it up, just keep working with them. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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You mamas sure know how to say the right things at the right time (for me)! I responded to a thread about hsing parents' math fears because that is an area I am confident about, but this late reading thing can get me very nervous!<br><br>
Thank you so much for the testimonials and support!
 

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I could read basic books (Pokey the Little Puppy, Clifford, Strawberry Shortcake, other various kid books, plus my parents would have me read signs when we were out for a walk/drive) before I was 4.
 

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As a child, I had a difficult time learning to read, but I think I just wasn't ready. I didn't actually start reading well & liking it until about nine years old. Charlotte's Web won me over. Then I turned into a book worm, uh-oh! There are books all over my house now...it's an addiction! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/bouncy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="bouncy">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>heldt123</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">As a child, I had a difficult time learning to read, but I think I just wasn't ready. I didn't actually start reading well & liking it until about nine years old. Charlotte's Web won me over. Then I turned into a book worm, uh-oh! There are books all over my house now...it's an addiction! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/bouncy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="bouncy"></div>
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Reminds me of DD. Today as I was dragging her away from the book fair (she has a ton if new books waiting to be read at the moment and I want to have some from her list left to buy for Christmas presents!) she told me she was a *book-aholic* <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 
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