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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
DS (3 yo) has very little. Based on his decoding level alone, we should be able to use any level 1 reader we want, but most of them are too long. He runs out of steam half way through them, then gets frusterated.

He has never been one for doing the things that seem to help other kids develop endurance, such as reading street signs.

I'd buy him more advanced Bob Books (we have the first set,) but we are on a pretty tight budget, and he doesn't really need the phonics help. There are few readers that are short enough to work for him at the library (our library doesn't have them or anything similar as far as I can tell.) When you add in his need for readers to be very gentle (neither scary nor sad) we have limited amount of books available.

I Spy readers seem to be just about right, but They are $3.99 each and we've already got a bunch of our own, plus the only one I could find at the library (and that one's do back in about a week.) Mostly I have him read picture books that are meant for adults to read to babies or toddlers, but those aren't great. They have very long words sometimes and a high frequency of more advanced phonics. Though he can decode these often, if he encounter too many of them it lowers his endurance even faster.

I'm not really sure what I need. A good list of books that he can handle (but my library will only have half of,) ways to help him gain endurance to match his decoding skills.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by eepster View Post
DS (3 yo) has very little. Based on his decoding level alone, we should be able to use any level 1 reader we want, but most of them are too long. He runs out of steam half way through them, then gets frusterated.

He has never been one for doing the things that seem to help other kids develop endurance, such as reading street signs.

I'd buy him more advanced Bob Books (we have the first set,) but we are on a pretty tight budget, and he doesn't really need the phonics help. There are few readers that are short enough to work for him at the library (our library doesn't have them or anything similar as far as I can tell.) When you add in his need for readers to be very gentle (neither scary nor sad) we have limited amount of books available.

I Spy readers seem to be just about right, but They are $3.99 each and we've already got a bunch of our own, plus the only one I could find at the library (and that one's do back in about a week.) Mostly I have him read picture books that are meant for adults to read to babies or toddlers, but those aren't great. They have very long words sometimes and a high frequency of more advanced phonics. Though he can decode these often, if he encounter too many of them it lowers his endurance even faster.

I'm not really sure what I need. A good list of books that he can handle (but my library will only have half of,) ways to help him gain endurance to match his decoding skills.

DS#1 was an early reader. We had very good luck with board-book versions of Dr. Suess (sp?). The board-book versions are usually redacted. The board book version of "Go Dog Go" and "Put Me in the Zoo" are great. We also had very good luck with Sandra Boynton's books. "Blue Hat, Green Hat" was an especial favorite, but they're all great. Eric Carles "Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What do you See?" and "Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear?" work well. (You could try "The Very Hungry Catepiller," too.) "Good Night Moon" is perfect for an earlier reader. "Ten, Nine, Eight" by Molly Bang is wonderful.

My kids also like Richard Scarry's books in short doses. We'll read a page or two and spend time looking at the pictures and matching words to pictures.
 

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Does a 3yo really need endurance at this stage? When you look at large groups of children they tend to learn with a steady overall accumulation of decoding and endurance skills, but individual children learn with bursts, plateaus and asynchronicities. I think that's normal. Be patient. Any modern western household is full of print. Your child will move ahead with the next stage of progress on his agenda when the time is right for him. If the obvious things (Level 1 books, street signs, bits of print around the home) aren't right for him now it's probably because he just isn't ready. My elder dd achieved stamina and fluency at age 4 by reading housewares catalogs and old National Geographics of all things. When the next stage is ready to click it'll click. I don't think there are particular magic bullet resources that make these things click.

The only thing I'd suggest is that if your ds's vision hasn't been checked that you get him screened at some point. My youngest lingered at the stage of being able to decode almost any word but not really reading fluently for over 18 months. Eventually we discovered that she's so far-sighted as to be legally blind without glasses. She got glasses and picked up her first novel a week or two later.

Miranda
 

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Some kids can track at that age. Some can't. That could play into it.
If he enjoys decoding individual words as an activity with you, why don't you stay with that?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
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Originally Posted by moominmamma View Post
Does a 3yo really need endurance at this stage?
Not really, I just find it hard to spend as much for a book that takes him five minutes or less to read as I pay for books or magazines that last me hours and hours. I don't think I'd care at all if our local library had a shelf full of books that he could read, but they just seem to have a few level 1 (most of which don't work) and tons and tons of level 2 readers. They have none of the really short biggining readers like Bob Books.

I guess a better way to explain my problem is...

How do I accomidate my low endurance reader, without going broke since our local library isn't accomidating to really early readers?
 

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I wonder if maybe you are overestimating your son's need for novelty? DD took a while to warm up to reading longer unfamiliar books. She liked reading very long familiar books over and over well before she had the patience for reading longer unfamiliar books. It's all about the effort/reward ratio.
I wouldn't say that she was really interested in reading new books that took more than 5 minutes until she was at a second grade level or so. I wouldn't really worry about finding new books at his level (both decoding and interest) unless he is really asking for them.

That said, we went through a period of reading every We Both Read book that we could get our hands on; they come in all reading levels, and they have a big reward for the effort because the parent reads the complex parts and the child reads the simple parts.
DD loved having her own part (and I loved being able to read her a book without her trying to read the whole thing herself). So you might see if your library has any of those--or if they'd be willing to order any. After I raved about them to our librarian, a bunch of new ones appeared on the shelves.


I hope that helps. And I'll keep an eye out for easy picture books the next time I hit the library.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
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Originally Posted by no5no5 View Post
I wonder if maybe you are overestimating your son's need for novelty?
So, possibly my feeling that one doesn't want to read the same book 5 or 6 times is more my projecting my own needs than his. I can't say he's ever actually complained about seeing the same book twice (or 3x, or 4x, or god only knows how many times he's read Green Eggs and Ham.)

Also, he does seem to have more endurance with books he has half memorized like One Fish Two Fish or Green Eggs and Ham, which are much longer than any other books he reads.
 

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Originally Posted by eepster View Post
So, possibly my feeling that one doesn't want to read the same book 5 or 6 times is more my projecting my own needs than his. I can't say he's ever actually complained about seeing the same book twice (or 3x, or 4x, or god only knows how many times he's read Green Eggs and Ham.)

Also, he does seem to have more endurance with books he has half memorized like One Fish Two Fish or Green Eggs and Ham, which are much longer than any other books he reads.
Oh, gosh, DD isn't ready to return a book we borrow from the library until she's read it at least 5 times. The books we own she must have read (or have had read to her) at least 50 times each. Conservatively. Some of them we've read hundreds of times.

I think the first time (or couple of times) young kids read a book, they are focusing so much on the words that they may lose sight of the story, or at least may miss aspects of the story. And they may miss some of the illustrations too, if it is an illustrated book. So there is a lot of value in rereading for them that there (presumably) isn't for older kids or adults. Though, I must say, there are several books that I have reread over and over again and they never seem to lose their value.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by eepster View Post
I guess a better way to explain my problem is...

How do I accomidate my low endurance reader, without going broke since our local library isn't accomidating to really early readers?
You might want to look at Enchanted Learning. For $20/year, you get unlimited access to lots of printable books at various levels. Most of the books seem to be non-fiction, with a few fables tossed in, so they shouldn't be too scary for your ds.
 

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Not to answer your original question, but can you order books from the library system and get them that way, even if they aren't in your local branch?
 

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DD is 3.5 and has been sight-reading some words for about a year and decoding for maybe 6 months? and she doesn't have much endurance either. I admit I've found it perplexing because she really LIKES books and she always wants me to point to the words when I read to her, so it seems like she has a lot of interest in reading.

However, I will mention that about two weeks ago we finally had our ped ophthalmologist appointment and found out she's really shockingly nearsighted--I guess she just hides it really well. She got her glasses today. On the way home she apparently discovered street signs (the ones with street numbers and names) for the first time and was quite delighted with them. I'm waiting with interest to see if it affects her reading endurance over the next couple weeks as she gets used to them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
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Originally Posted by Aufilia View Post
DD is 3.5 and has been sight-reading some words for about a year and decoding for maybe 6 months? and she doesn't have much endurance either. I admit I've found it perplexing because she really LIKES books and she always wants me to point to the words when I read to her, so it seems like she has a lot of interest in reading.

However, I will mention that about two weeks ago we finally had our ped ophthalmologist appointment and found out she's really shockingly nearsighted--I guess she just hides it really well. She got her glasses today. On the way home she apparently discovered street signs (the ones with street numbers and names) for the first time and was quite delighted with them. I'm waiting with interest to see if it affects her reading endurance over the next couple weeks as she gets used to them.
I actually have been wondering a bit abot his vision and just haven't made an appointment yet. (I'm also supposed to take him to the dentist according to his ped, but I'm being a wimp about that.)
 

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What about a subscription to one of the kids' magazines? DD gets Highlights for Kids (the preschool version of Highlights) and enjoys it. It is full of different kinds of stories. Not sure how much it is b/c my mom ordered it, but probably around $2/month.

We also read several books at the bookstore each time we go to buy one. Lots of adults just go in to read, I notice! Why not the kids?
 

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Why not just let him read as many pages as he can handle, then you read the rest? Or make your own "books" with stick figure illustrations - then they can be about whatever he's particularly interested in, and can include words you know he knows (or could use practice with.)
 

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I'd scour goodwill and other thrift stores. We found our set of Bob books at a yard sale. The books are only good for so long that there seems to be lots of used copies available if you look for them. I remember finding some easy readers on the library book sale shelf too.

My son loved starfall.com when he was learning to read. I think you can print easy books there too.
 

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Have you talked to your librarian about Inter-Library Loan? It's a system outside of your local library, reaching out to other libraries across the state or region. If you know specific titles you want, they should be able to get them for you. You can use Amazon or some other online source to take the librarian an list of titles to look for, and see what can be found. It takes awhile for things to arrive sometimes, but not too long. There is probably also a limit on the number of things you can order, but if you keep the list revolving you can always have new things on the way.
 

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I was also going to suggest, as a pp has, printable, leveled, books. They will often use these in kindy for beginning readers because they are short, predictable, print is correlated to the visual on each page....good for early readers. I think if you google leveled readers you might find something of interest.
 

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We have the Starfall readers book set (which we ordered from their site), and I was going to suggest that. But, the stories are actually just the same as what's on Starfall.com for free. Maybe that's an option?

We also take turns reading with them at this stage. We read a page or two, then it's their turn. Might help for longer books?
 

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I think this just comes with time/age, too. DD was significantly older when she learned to read (at 3.5 she was only decoding isolated words) but her endurance was low at first, too. She also preferred large print books when she first started reading. I think some of it is just that they aren't used to concentrating so hard to get through a short little easy book--think of how much effort this is for limited payoff.

As her skills improved (especially, as her sight words increased exponentially) she was able to read for much longer. If you really want to work on this (and I agree that there's no special need to), you might consider sight word flashcards or sight word computer games. DD actually loved these for a bit. Or what about the Starfall readers? DD also liked those when she was just learning.
 

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I second the suggestion to trade off reading with him, especially with new, longer books. A great game is Popcorn -- one of you reads for a bit and when you want to stop, you say "Popcorn", signaling the other person to take over.
 
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