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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Every year at Christmas my husband's (Italian) family makes "pizzelles" for breakfast, which to them is basically pizza dough cut into strips and fried in olive oil, then dusted with salt (or cinnamon/sugar). To make the dough they use white flour, olive oil, salt, yeast, and sometimes a little honey. When it is fried it puffs up and is airy and a little crunchy/chewy. I was wondering if I could make it with light buckwheat flour. What do you think? Would I need to add anything to make this work?
 

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I don't see why not- I use buckwheat flour for everything now, and it works great!

If you grind some fresh groats and soak the flour overnight, it will make them much lighter and fluffier- and they will cook a lot faster.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by chlobo View Post
where does one buy buckwheat groats?

What kind of grinder do you have?
You can buy the groats as a lot of health food stores (the Whole Foods I go to does NOT sell them). I have been using a blender to grind the groats, but I think DH is buying me a grain mill for christmas.
 

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Yeah, I get ours from PCC (local co-op). We special order a 45# bag so that I don't have to go buy them every week.


I actually use an old coffee grinder- it works great, and is SOOOO much faster than the blender to grind the groats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by changingseasons View Post
I don't see why not- I use buckwheat flour for everything now, and it works great!

If you grind some fresh groats and soak the flour overnight, it will make them much lighter and fluffier- and they will cook a lot faster.
CS - We usually make the dough the night before to let it rise overnight. Do you think that is sufficient for soaking, or do you think I should soak the flour first (maybe in the morning), then add the other ingredients that evening to make the dough and let it sit overnight?
 

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I think that sounds fine, but I'm certainly not the soaking expert. I did just read that when you grind your own grains, the phytic acid is reduced much quicker (compared to soaking packaged flours)- even as quick as an hour. So I'm sure that letting it rise overnight is plenty of time to break down the phytic acid.
 

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