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I think my ds may be gifted. My brother was/is. I am not. He is only 9 months old, but he already says a few words discriminately. Dada actually means dada. He says bye-bye (he will crawl out of a room and turn around to wave at us and tell us "bye-bye") and "yes" (although yes may be just something he says...)He even enunciates the 's'.<br><br>
I do home daycare so he gets to explore our big play room every day from 9 to 5:30 or so. He is ok when he's there, outside or someplace new. But if he is contained in any way (read "carseat") he screams hysterically to get out. When I bring him upstairs after the daycare kids leave, he screams the instant I put him down in our "computer room." He HATES that room and he will crawl over to the gate and scream. He will stop as soon as you take him somewhere else. We do bring new toys in the computer room, to try and make in interesting.....<br><br>
I think he needs extra stimulation. More than the average guy.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>momtosimon</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7998514"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">so I guess none of you think nine month old boredom is a sign of being gifted.....</div>
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I have no idea, but one of the most noticeable things about our kid as a baby was that he had an unusually long attention span.<br><br>
Two things occur to me reading your post. One is that most babies need a lot of attention and interaction. Most babies don't like it when parents are on the computer and ignoring them so if he's cranky at those times it doesn't seem atypical to me. That said, if he's getting plenty of attention I'd avoid thinking it is your job to constantly provide new stimulation or entertainment. This can be a difficult habit to break over the long term and it isn't particularly good fo rkids.
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>momtosimon</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7998514"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">so I guess none of you think nine month old boredom is a sign of being gifted.....</div>
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my son was often bored as a 9 month old.<br><br>
he is 11 months now, i dont know, does he qualify as "gifted"?
 

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Every nine month old I've ever been around must have been gifted. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Duck">:
 

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I read your post earlier today and didn't see a question or seeking confirmation, sorry <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">.<br><br>
There's lots of info at hoagies.com.<br><br>
I think 9 months is too early to identify giftedness - you can't extrapolate reliably. Whether or not a baby or toddler is gifted, I don't think there's anything different to "do" with him. I'd just enjoy these early months.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>BelgianSheepDog</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7999919"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Every nine month old I've ever been around must have been gifted. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Duck">:</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/ROTFLMAO.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rotflmao">
 

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But on a helpful note <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> here's a chart that might have good info for you:<br><br><a href="http://www.austega.com/gifted/preschoolers.htm" target="_blank">http://www.austega.com/gifted/preschoolers.htm</a>
 

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I find that chart's averages unhelpful given that one of the norms of young child development incl. gifted development is that everything does not come together at the same rate. In my bloodline, for three generations of gifted (assuming my kids are), we say next to nothing verbally until 14-15 months. But some of those physical skills ... 33 months to throw a ball at 30% advanced? My son could wang you in the head at 10 feet at 18 months.<br><br>
We have a friend-child also of gifted parents who was not walking, IIRC, at 15-16 months and his enunciation is bad but he expresses a lot of deep thoughts. My child, 27 months, same age, talks shockingly clearly for his age and will use this vocabulary to identify pieces of sporting goods and talk about pretty girls he likes.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>supervee</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8000187"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">But on a helpful note <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> here's a chart that might have good info for you:<br><br><a href="http://www.austega.com/gifted/preschoolers.htm" target="_blank">http://www.austega.com/gifted/preschoolers.htm</a></div>
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Thank you.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>pigpokey</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8000339"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I find that chart's averages unhelpful given that one of the norms of young child development incl. gifted development is that everything does not come together at the same rate. In my bloodline, for three generations of gifted (assuming my kids are), we say next to nothing verbally until 14-15 months. But some of those physical skills ... 33 months to throw a ball at 30% advanced? My son could wang you in the head at 10 feet at 18 months.<br><br>
We have a friend-child also of gifted parents who was not walking, IIRC, at 15-16 months and his enunciation is bad but he expresses a lot of deep thoughts. My child, 27 months, same age, talks shockingly clearly for his age and will use this vocabulary to identify pieces of sporting goods and talk about pretty girls he likes.</div>
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I have the same issues with the charts. The children in our family were all over the map in development, with personality and birth order playing a strong role. My oldest didn't speak until 22 months old, although no one could really tell after he had a few months under his belt.<br><br>
I found 9 months to be a very hard age because it was like an in-between age for the baby. The child is an older baby and he/she wants to do things that are just a touch out of reach. Mine used to get overstimulated when I took them out at that age because (I now know) they're introverts. And they couldn't walk yet but they wanted to get to things that required walking or climbing. One of my sister's kids was similarly frustrated at that age because she was an extrovert and needed to see new things.<br><br>
My oldest would just sit and largely hang out at 9 months. He had a very long attention span and he would be amused by the strangest, most simple things. He would stare at the decorations on the walls or he would do weird things like try to stand hairbrushes up on their ends. My second son, at 10 months, would sit in a pile of books for longer periods of time. One of my sister's kids was like my oldest and was relatively content with little. Another of hers (they're all "out there" in some way) would find ways to amuse herself by getting into things. Her kids climbed and walked at this age so it was really hard for my poor sister! At least one of her kids was literally into or on top of everything!<br><br>
I think that families with a strong and pervasive history of giftedness, of the higher variety, probably have good reason to suspect giftedness in their babes. I think parents of babes who are doing highly unusual, greatly advanced milestones, also have reason to suspect it. I wouldn't, personally, count boredom at 9 mos as a sign of giftedness. And I think that, for most people, it's an issue of time revealing things. One of my family members was completely typical until age 5, when she started memorizing the Latin names of bones and spontaneously reading (like 3rd grade level or above). I thought my oldest was delayed because he was so quiet and content, in addition to other things that I won't get into here. I think this is a hard thing to peg at such a young age.
 

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Your ds may or may not be gifted. At nine months, from what I can tell, it can sometimes be tricky to tell unless they are truly off the charts. Best thing to do is what your said. Give him lots of things to stimulate his mind and body. Not that you don't <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> Talk to him and tell him how things work. Read to him when you can... not that you aren't. It does sound like he is very good at letting you know what he wants and needs <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I found this list on a website (sorry, I no longer have the link). I have recently been thinking that my 20 month old might be (both my brother and I were determined to be gifted in elementary school and placed in excellerated math and reading programs and she seems exceptionally bright and we get a lot of comments on her verbal skills) so I was looking into it. 9 months might still be early, but there are plenty of things to look for in the upcoming months.<br>
Birth – 2 years<br>
The following checklist is a rough indication of what you may want to look out for after your child is born up to 2 years of age.<br><br>
Ability of recognize carers early (within a few months after birth) (don’t remember)<br>
Early expressions (e.g. smiling)<br>
Unusual alertness<br>
Interest in books (turning pages of books before 1 year of age and paying attention when read to within 6 months)<br>
Interest in computers<br>
Unusually active and high levels of energy (but not hyperactive)<br>
Playing with shape sorters by about 11 months.<br>
Ability to form two word phrases by 14 months<br>
Ability to understand instructions by 18 months<br>
Ability to say and understand many words before 18 months<br>
Could stay still and enjoy a TV programs (e.g., Sesame Street) by the age of 1<br>
Has favorite TV shows/VCD/DVDs by age 1<br>
Appears to require less sleep (yet not sleepy or irritable due to lack of sleep)<br>
Recognition of letters/alphabets by age 2<br>
Recognition and rote counting of numbers 1 – 10 or higher by age 2<br>
Recognition of colors by age 2<br>
Recognition of first word by age 2<br>
Interest in puzzles by age 2<br>
Has long attention span in interest areas by age 2<br>
Ability to form at least 3 word sentence by age 2<br>
Interest in time by age 2
 

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I have a gifted 5.5-year-old, and I didn't have a clue he was gifted at 9 months old. In fact, he was rather slug-like at 9 months old. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> He didn't even crawl until 8.5 months.<br><br>
I think it is really hard, if not impossible, to tell for sure at that age.
 

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I think this is one of those "all poppies are flowers but all flowers are not poppies" things.
 
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