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A close friend of mine has children in public school and has decided to stop vaxing immediatly. A friend of hers told her to claim religious exemption and if they asked what religion tell them that your Wiccan. I only know one Wiccan IRL and not really well as we just met last weekend, so I know pretty much nada when it comes to Wicca. Is vaccinating somehow against Wiccan beliefs?<br><br>
If I posted in the wrong forum, just move me. I wasn't sure where to put this.
 

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I am Wiccan ( more Shamanic but ....) and I have religious exemptions on both my kids.<br>
In my state,and I think all states, they do NOT ask your religion. You just have to sign a form that says something like " vaccinations are against my religious tenets or practices or beliefs..." end of story.<br>
Wicca or most other pagan beliefs are generally against western medicine, and this includs vaccines. I am sure it is not blanket, just as not with all Judeo-Christians.<br>
For the most part, earth-based or pagan religions lean toward the wise-woman approach to healing which is to stay in tune with nature, practice balance and wellness and avoid artificial means of healing. THis is spiritual as well as philosophical. Hope that helps!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hippie.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hippie">
 

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In some states you don't have to tell them your religion. When asked I never tell or I'll just say Christian and leave it at that. IMO it's none of their business.
 

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Up until just recently to claim a religious exemption in Texas you had to be a member of a recognized religion that had a problem with vaxing. In my case I am Celtic pagan not Wiccan, but Wicca is a recognized religion in the USA. So I would have claimed an exemption as a Wiccan because my religion isn't a recognized one. Now we have a philisophical exemption, and they changed the wording of the religious exemption so that just about anyone could use it. It now is worded like in most other states so that you just have to claim the vaccinating is against the tenets of your religion, but you don't have to qualify your religion. However many people believe that the philisophical exemption will be done away with soon as many law-makers are in a tizzy over how to get rid of it. If the philosophical exemption goes the rewording of the religious exemption will probably go with it. We just can't seem to win in Texas.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rolleyes">:
 

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This might help.<br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><a href="http://www.gval.com/exempt.htm" target="_blank">WHAT CONSTITUTES RELIGION</a><br><br>
An area of misconception lies in the "religious exemption" clause. Parents are misled and are forced into submitting a letter from their place of worship stating that the church disagrees with the vaccination of children and/or adults.<br><br>
The assumption by some that the "religious beliefs" of an individual must be dictated by the policy of some church is patently wrong. Webster’s Dictionary will not uphold this belief, but since this is a legal question, a legal dictionary should be consulted. Black’s Law Dictionary provides these definitions:<br><br>
RELIGION: "Man’s relation to Divinity, to reverence, worship, obedience, and submission to mandates and precepts of supernatural or superior beings. In its broadest sense includes all forms of belief in the existence of superior beings exercising power over human beings by volition, imposing rules of conduct, with future rewards and punishments. Bond uniting man to God, and a virtue whose purpose is to render God worship due him as source of all being and principle of all government of things." (Nikulnikoff v. Archbishop, etc., of Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church, 142 Misc. 894, 255 N.Y.S. 653,663)<br><br>
RELIGIOUS FREEDOM: "Within Constitution embraces not only the right to worship God according to the dictates of one’s conscience, but also the right to do, or forbear to do, any act, for conscience sake, the doing or forbearing of which is not inimical to the peace, good order, and morals of society." (Barnette v. West Virginia State Board of Education, D.C.W.Va. 47 F. Supp. 251, 253,254; Jones v. City of Moultrie, 196 Ga. 526,27 S.E. 2d 39)<br></td>
</tr></table></div>
 

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If I ever needed to write a religious exemption (we have a philosophical exemption here) I'd just say that vaccination was not consistent with the wiccan rede as I interpret it. I could not in good concience inject toxins into my son.<br><br>
However since there isn't any agreed upon wiccan dogma there is of course no official wiccan position on vaccinations (or anything else.)<br><br>
If you want some good information about wicca, check out witchvox.com or beliefnet.org
 
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