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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK... So I'm new to this eating healthy, whole foods thing! We are gradually making small changes to improve my family's health. Whole grain bread, brown rice, more/ organic veggies, etc.

So, here is my issue... I absolutely LOVE to bake! Cookies, cakes, brownies, you name it! I am currently using a 50/50 blend of white & whole wheat flour and everything is turning out fine. Now I want to cut back on white sugar. What can I use as a replacement? Thanks for the help!
 

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Honey is a cup for cup replacement. I think that maple syrup is as well, but I'm not for certain. Stevia is used in a much smaller quantity...you'd have to check the box and perhaps some "crunchy" cookbooks for how to change the recipe to make up for the lack of "chemical" reaction from the sugar though.
 

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You can try Rapadura if you want a one to one replacement without much hassle. It's evaporated whole can juice. More in the way of nutrients than white sugar, though it still ranks up there on the GI. Honey and maple syrup are good, though it can be a bit more tricky to find suitable replacement ratios, and you do have to compensate for the extra wet ingredient.

Also, one thing I found is that I can cut way back on the recommended amount of sweetener in any recipe. Made zucchini bread today with only a cup of sugar (Rapadura) for a double batch when the recipe calls for three.
 

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I also cut back on the amount of sugar and use Rapadura...My "healthier" oatmeal cookies were eaten just as fast! Also, I find that whole wheat pastry flour works great for baking.

Jennifer
 

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to the whole wheat pastry flour comment. I use it exclusively in all my baking (and I do a lot!) Another plus to using whole grain flour is that you can cut back on the sugar amount since the flour itself has flavor and some sweetness. I do find occasionally that some pastries will brown faster/more with the whole grain flour, but I just cut back a tiny bit on the cooking time and on the sugar. (Sugar will cause browning.)

Hmmm, I guess I can't say "exclusively," though, since I still make my Auntie Margie's famous Scottish shortbread with white flour. I really can't mess with perfection on that one, so I just compromise and only make them 2 or 3 times a year.


Krista
 

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agave syrup works great because its healthy (made from a plant) but doesn't have that taste that honey gives things you can usually find it in natural food stores
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
OK... Since some of you mentioned baking with the WW flour... I am reading a book about ear infections and just yesterday I read the section on foods affect our bodies. Anyway, it mentioned something about eating rancid fatty acids b/c the ww flour goes bad so quickly but they didn't go into it any further than that. So.... how can I tell if the flour I bought at the store is "rancid"? The exp date says it is still good for a long time, but ??????? Help!
:
 

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Really if you buy ww flour it should be refrigerated at the store, ideally, but if not, try to buy from a place that has a high turnover on the flour (so it hasn't been sitting too long) and stick it in your fridge as soon as you get home. Also, look for brands that specifically say they leave all the parts of the wheat in the flour--most ww flours are actually just white flour with some wheat germ added back in.

You actually only need half as much honey as sugar when you substitute. I just add a little extra flour or less liquid if the recipe calls for liquids to make the consistency come out about the same. Honey does make things brown a little faster, though, so I turn down my oven a little, too (10-15 degrees).
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Stugroupie
So.... how can I tell if the flour I bought at the store is "rancid"? The exp date says it is still good for a long time, but ??????? Help!
:
You can tell by tasting it. Put a pinch of the flour straight on your tongue. If it tastes the least bit bitter, then it's no good.
 
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