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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 4 1/2 needs a filling for a molar that has already been filled (at 20 months). The dentist is using a resin material and mentioned a fluoride releasing base? Anyone know of good information on this? Thanks in advance,<br>
Aimee
 

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I'm not expert but this could be a substance called glass ionomer. We had the pink glass ionomer put in our daughter's molar when she was just over 2. The holistic London-based dentist just scraped the cavity with that pick thing they used, then put this pink stuff straight in and that whole process took no more than 5 minutes. No drilling, no injections, no drama. The bad news is this does contain flouride and we weren't told this by the dentist. The good news it is obviously mercury-free, and it fell out about a year later and another holistic dentist confirmed the cavity hard and good and said that the glass ionomer had remineralized the tooth.<br><br>
I have since learned that this method of scraping and filling is called ART for Atraumatic Restorative Treatment. Obviously offers some benefits for little ones but the flouride... We have since found another tiny hole and we are wondering what to do about that so I know how you feel trying to explore and find the best options.<br><br>
Hope this helps and good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I believe she said resin/composite based with a fluoride releasing substance.<br><br>
I am totally against fluoridation in water but I will admit the topical fluoride saved us from having my daughter put under GA for this same cavity at 2. It seriously halted the growth for 2 years.
 

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It was a glass ionomer. Usually they are white, but there was a company a few years ago that sold it in colors for small kids. It was the fluoride that remineralized the tooth. These are marvelous for small children. And please get that small cavity looked at before it becomes a big issue. It is much easier to place a small filling than do a pulpotomy (root canal) and crown or an extraction.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>aimeemac</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8128215"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My 4 1/2 needs a filling for a molar that has already been filled (at 20 months). The dentist is using a resin material and mentioned a fluoride releasing base? Anyone know of good information on this? Thanks in advance,<br>
Aimee</div>
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Oh, and if there was already a restoration there, it was probably a glass ionomer too. Judging by your child's age when it was placed (these are easy and quick - perfect for a 1 yo) and the fact that it needs to be redone. They don't usually last forever as they are not bonded to the tooth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sorry, I must have been confusing in my answer.<br><br>
My daughter is 4 and has had this cavity since 2 (we halted it with topical fluoride, I believe). We have been under careful treatment with a pediatric dentist since then and go every 3 months. I didn't want to put her through GA at that young age. Now, at age 4, she is able to sit for a filling w/o having sedation. In the last few months the cavity has started to grow again and I feel confident that fixing it will be easy and the best option. X-rays show that it has not invaded the nerve area of the tooth, so pulpectomy (or baby root canal) is not a concern.<br><br>
I've carefully researched all materials in which fillings are made from, since my son had many problems at age 3. We have chose the resin/composite fills.<br><br>
However when we were discussing this yesterday the hygienist mentioned that there would be a fluoride releasing base? From my google search this seems to be common? However, I can't find much info with relation to the resin/composite.<br><br>
Sorry, if my questions were confusing. Stalling cavities is rare, so I can see where I could have been confusing!<br>
Sorrry <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
Thanks again for your help!<br>
Aimee
 

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There are bases that have fluoride in them too. If you're worried about it, you can ask to have a base with out fluoride. I usually use calcium hydroxide as a liner. I occasionally use a base with fluoride.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the input! I do appreciate it.<br><br>
Was wondering how you feel about the fluoride bases? Does the fluoride absorb into the body or does it stay just within the tooth structure? I do agree that fluoride has its benefits. I'm on the fence. This tooth has been filled before on the top (it is a molar) now the decay is on the side. So, its not that the filling fell out, just that the decay is in a new area.<br><br>
Appreciate it!<br>
Aimee
 
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