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I have a friend who is having a planned c-section. She nursed her first babe for about a month or so--supplimented from the beginning and is interested in nursing again, but worried about "not having enough milk" Are there any fliers, handouts etc... that i could give her that says very simply things like: no bottles or pacifiers. Nurse on demand. Positions for nursing after a c- section. Pain meds after c-section and nursing. etc....<br>
I am going to her baby shower in a couple of weeks and already bought her everything having to do with breastfeeding on her registry. I'd like to have some good info for her in her gift basket as well. Thanks!
 

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Not fliers per se, but you could probably put something together from the info here:<br><a href="http://www.kellymom.com/bf/start/concerns/c-section.html" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/bf/start/con...c-section.html</a><br><br><a href="http://www.askdrsears.com/html/2/T021400.asp" target="_blank">http://www.askdrsears.com/html/2/T021400.asp</a>
 

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I had a c section and I am still breastfeeding my 11 month old. This stuff helped for me:<br><br>
Rooming in with my husband or someone else staying in there with me 24/7 to change diapers and stuff.<br><br>
Football hold was the most comfortable position<br><br>
Just tell her not to freak out if her milk doesn't come in right away. Mine took 5 days. Tell her to be ready for the hospital to pressure her into formula bc most usually do it seems like. And give her info on how supplementing is not necessarry. And be sure and tell her that if she talks to a Lactation Consultant that isn't helpful, to talk to another one. Get Second Opinions!!! Doctors and Lactation Consultants aren't perfect and will give out bad breastfeeding advice at times.<br><br>
I hope everything works out good with her!!!!
 

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No resources but I've a good friend who has successfully bf'd both her children following c-sections. With both, her milk took 'til about 4/5 days to come in, and she breastfed both exclusively (no formula) past a year of age with each.<br><br>
I think the most important thing is to be INFORMED about signs of dehydration etc. so that mom doesn't assume babe is starving when babe is not - and so that mom doesn't assume that things are fine, when they're not, KWIM? For many women in our culture, it's a real leap of faith, getting through those first few weeks of breastfeeding and trusting that you're really, truly, making enough milk for your little one. The more she knows about how to tell if babe is really hydrated etc., the less likely she will be to fall prey to the "just one bottle to supplement" approach.<br><br>
My friend called me on the evening of Day 4 while her dh was getting ready to load up and head to town for formula. I went through all the "# of wet diapers, # of poopy diapers etc." questions and reassured her that the frequent nursing and baby's frustration was because baby was working HARD to get that milk in. She called three hours later and her milk had come in. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> So make sure she knows to call you (and/or others) when she starts having these fears. Because it's really reassuring to have someone on the other end of the phone (or in the house with you) who can talk a person through it.
 

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Just wanted to add, I had a c-section too, and nursed fine, no supplementing. My milk also took 5 days to come in and I was at panic point the day before. If you have a breast-feeding supportive ped lined up a visit in the first week can help (it's always good to hear from an expert that, no she isn't dehydrated <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> and that 10% weight loss is OK).<br>
Oh and if she is using sposies, remind her that she won't properly be able to judge the number of wet diapers and not to panic, if it seems there are not enough (compare the weight of the used diaper to a new one to get an idea of how "wet" it is)
 

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I had c-sections with both of my kids<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"> . Oh, well <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"> ...<br><br>
First was due to feetling breech and I didn’t know any better that time, so I agreed to have a planned c-section at 40 weeks (now of course I regret about it deeply). This first c-section was awful. Anesthesia didn’t work properly and I vent through agonizing pain.<br>
Recovery was even worse. I was loosing <i>much more blood than I should</i>; I was SOOO weak, I passed out when I first tried to go to the bathroom and almost passed out again with the second try to get up. I was in a lot of pain for at least 2 weeks, but refused to take any painkillers (even though nurses kept bugging me with it saying that I wouldn’t get my milk if I’m in a lot of pain as I was). Anyway, I still got my milk on day 3 and is still happily nursing my almost 2y.o. (together with his 6.5 m.o. sister). Our start was very rough; bleeding like crazy nipples, HORRIBLE pain any time my baby would latch on for at least 6 weeks, etc.<br><br>
My second c-section was much better (maybe because of 24 hours of laboring prior it, so my body was ready to have this baby). Plus I was eating and drinking during the day alot. I wanted to have a VBAC, but got really thick meconium and agreed to have another c-section.<br>
No painkillers afterwards either. My milk was in within 24 hours (maybe because I was nursing through the pregnancy). Everything vent pretty smoothly this time around and my 6.5 m.o. is EBF and she weighs 23lbs. Happy end…alleluia<br><br>
PS. My advice to your friend is to get nice home made healthy meals as soon as possible. If they bug her that she suppose to be on "juice diet" until she passes her gas to lie them that she did pass it already in order to be left alone. I had my second c-section at night. Even though I was eating the whole day before while laboring at home, I found myself being VERY hungry in the morning (after the c-section). I asked to bring me food and half an hour later I got a cup of tea and a tiny can of juice, WTF?! They told me that I needed to be on juice diet till I pass gass <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">: . Yea, right...and who is going to make milk for my hungry baby while I'm on this 'juice diet'?! So I lied them that I passed gass and needed normal meal which I did get about an hour later. It was still pure junk! I called my mom and from that moment on I had plenty of healthy home made food which I'm sure helped me alot to heal, gave me strength to walk alot and to make plenty of milk.
 

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haha, that reminds me, no one told me not to eat after my section. So like 2 hours after surgery I was tucking into pasta salad that DH had brought me (before we knew I was going in for CS--I was in for monitoring and they decided to cut me open around 18:30). I was absolutely fine.<br><br>
My BF experience, well, it sucked but I don't think it had much at all to do with my CS. I didn't have a problem (in terms of the incision) with the hold; many women do say football is best but cross cradle (right hand to left breast) was easiest for me. I had plenty of stomach to prop the baby up though!<br><br>
The only thing I can think of is to know that it can take an extra day or two for her milk to come in, so don't panic if it doesn't.
 

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I had mom mom bring me swanson's broth and peach nectar for after because the hospital's vegetable broth was greasy. eew.<br><br>
I included contingencies for c-sec in my birth plan even though I didn't plan one. These included:<br><br>
Double-layer suturing when closing surgery (increases chances of VBAC success slightly)<br>
Father stays w/ baby, baby brought to recovery w/ me.<br>
Awake during surgery (epidural/spinal anesthesia)<br>
Nurse as soon as possible after surgery, in recovery (nurse had to hold baby, I still couldn't move much, but we gave it a try)<br>
NO bottles or paci's.<br><br>
If I had a do-over I'd have included: Rooming in w/ bili lights if they're needed (jaundice being more likely after all those meds), if bili count 20 or higher, justifying need to go to intermediate care nursery for intense lights, feeding schedule will be to nurse every 2 hours for 30 minutes with baby still in wraparound flexible light pad (hospital I went to had a 30 min. every 3 hrs. schedule, I did research after the fact). NO FORMULA, if baby must be apart from mom, pumped colostrum/milk will be given. If I had a do-over I'd disallow heel pokes to check blood sugar. My poor babe came out of there looking like a pincushion!<br><br>
Advance request to see lactation consultant ASAP once in postpartum room. If must be separated from baby, this is to get instruction on using pump as well as for a check of how nursing is going.<br><br>
Have her DH and a friend or mom or someone else spell each other providing her assistance so the baby can room in around the clock.<br><br>
Have baby sleep at the breast with many pillows. While rooming in Baby only needs to be in isolette when she's in the bathroom or shower or on exercise walks to the end of the corridor and back. If at the breast the whole time, nursing is readily available constantly to baby for helping supply come in.<br><br>
Meds really are okay, worst case scenario baby might get a bit groggy as mine did (she was jaundiced which also might have been why she was groggy). Percocet and motrin alternating were how I managed my pain in-hospital and the first couple days after--then just motrin.<br><br>
Though we hadn't planned to, we allowed vit K because surgical birth is riskier and more traumatic to the baby's system. NO VAX SHOTS and if a boy no circ'ing will minimize trauma that could interfere with bonding/nursing.
 

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I had a c/s with my #2 (transverse breech) and I had no problem with milk supply. I did have difficulty with nursing, but that was a latch issue in combination with my powerful letdown/abundant milk supply not an incision thing. The LCs were of limited help but basically I just nursed creatively and through the pain until things worked themselves out around 4 mos. and now nursing is not a problem.<br><br>
We roomed in 24 hrs. No supplements, no pacis or the like. I had lots of pillows, preferred a cradle hold (although used a football hold a bit when she was a couple months old). My incision hurt like anything for the first couple weeks because one of the sutures was stuck to the surgical tape so it pulled any time I moved (or breathed) but a "binder" belt thing helped a ton with that.<br><br>
HTH
 

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LLL has resources for moms who will have c-sections. Here is the listing for the Naples, FL group: <a href="http://www.lllflorida.com/web/NaplesFL.html" target="_blank">http://www.lllflorida.com/web/NaplesFL.html</a>. You could also PM me if she doesn't live in your area and you'd like help finding her group.<br><br>
WHat a good friend she has in you!<br><br>
Sus
 

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I had an unplanned c-section with my second baby and I can give your friend some very practical advice on how to bring milk in quickly and ensure breastfeeding success.<br><br>
1. If at all possible, wait until labor begins to do the c-section. If that's not possible, allow the pregnancy to progress to at least 40 weeks before scheduling. This is crucial to your milk supply. The earlier the babe is delivered, the longer it takes for the milk to come in.<br><br>
2. Take some Mother's Milk tea to the hospital and start drinking it as soon as you are allowed to have liquids.<br><br>
3. As soon as you are reunited with the baby, strip him/her down to diaper and keep him/her in bed with you, skin-to-skin. Nearly anything the staff wants to do with your baby can be done in the room and almost always in your bed. For weights, they can bring the scales to your room. Same thing with vitals, injections, diaper changes, pedi or nurse assessments, etc.<br><br>
4. No bottles, pacis, supplementing of any kind. There is rarely a reason to supplement a baby, even c-section babies. If for some bizarre reason baby needs artificial feeding, use a cup or dropper. If baby needs to suck more than you can deal with, a clean finger is much better.<br><br>
5. Adequate pain medication is a must. There is no reason to deny pain medication to a post-op mama. The medication doesn't harm your milk or your baby, but pain very likely will.<br><br>
6. Pre-book an appointment with the hospital's lactation consultant, if one is available. If not, contact your local LLL and see if a leader would be able to come in the first 24 hours after the baby is born. Even better if you have a good friend who has nursed and can help.<br><br>
I followed steps 1-4 with my baby (5 & 6 were not available) and had transitional milk by day 2 post op. Baby was close to regaining his birth weght by discharge, day 3 post op.
 

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Bring the phone number of your local La Leche League leader and a board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC) to the hospital.<br><br>
Latch issues and sleepy babies may sometimes be more common in c section moms. There is help for these and all other issues.<br><br>
VERY VERY FREQUENT NURSING is normal and good! Babies who are sleepy from the meds are also normal and there are gentle ways to wake them up.<br><br>
C section moms are at increased risk for depression and feeling disconnected from their bodies so be gentle with yourself, don't expect to get any housework done, and find people to pamper you!<br><br>
Take good loving care of yourself.<br><br>
I'd get a book about breastfeeding and bring it to her in the hospital. One good one that's funny yet factual and not too big is So That's What They're For by Janet Tamaro. It definitely mentions the idea of not giving pacifiers/supplements etc.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>momma2libby</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8168144"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I had a c section and I am still breastfeeding my 11 month old. This stuff helped for me:<br><br>
Rooming in with my husband or someone else staying in there with me 24/7 to change diapers and stuff.<br><br>
Football hold was the most comfortable position<br><br>
Just tell her not to freak out if her milk doesn't come in right away. Mine took 5 days. Tell her to be ready for the hospital to pressure her into formula bc most usually do it seems like. And give her info on how supplementing is not necessarry. And be sure and tell her that if she talks to a Lactation Consultant that isn't helpful, to talk to another one. Get Second Opinions!!! Doctors and Lactation Consultants aren't perfect and will give out bad breastfeeding advice at times.<br><br>
I hope everything works out good with her!!!!</div>
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Yes to all of this. I also had a c-section. More than likely you will be pressured to give a bottle "so you can rest, after all you've had major surgery" and maybe because your milk hasn't come it yet or you have lots of visitors and don't want to do "that" in front of everyone. I was just adamant that I will BF her. I'm a parent now...her needs come first, especially at this time. The only thing I can say is just be really adamant about what you are going to do. This is a really vulnerable time. Especially for a first time mommy.<br><br>
If for some reason you and your baby are separated (has to go to NICU for observation, mom is really sick) then start pumping ASAP.<br><br>
Obviously I'm talking about routine C-sections with no complications. I know there are circumstances in which BFing can't always be done right away.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Turkish Kate</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8171329"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I had an unplanned c-section with my second baby and I can give your friend some very practical advice on how to bring milk in quickly and ensure breastfeeding success.<br><br>
1. If at all possible, wait until labor begins to do the c-section. If that's not possible, allow the pregnancy to progress to at least 40 weeks before scheduling. This is crucial to your milk supply. The earlier the babe is delivered, the longer it takes for the milk to come in.<br></div>
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Hmmm, I hadn't thought of that. I went into labor with DD#2 (at 38 weeks) and we had to do an emergency c-s because of her being transverse breech (which we knew we would need to do). If I have another child, I am sure they will pressure me to schedule a c-s around 38 weeks because I have a history of very fast labors (#1) and of going into labor somewhat early (#2) I will need a c-s because they needed to do a T cut on my uterus in order to turn and get DD#2 out due to her position so a VBAC is not an option and uterine rupture is a concern. I hadn't considered the impact of a scheduled c-s on my milk supply. Any great suggestions other than mother's milk tea and the like to avoid supply issues with a scheduled c-s?
 

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Wow! I wish I had known a fraction of these suggestions when I was having my babies! Luckily for me, no one had ever told me to expect more difficulty bf'ing if I had c/sections. I had three, count 'em, three unplanned c/sections (one was an HBAC turned emergency c/sec). I never mastered the football hold. I did master nursing while lying on my side very early. But other than using a pillow to protect my incision, I don't think I did anything differently from a vaginal birth mom. My milk always came in quickly and I actually had over supply.<br><br>
I would emphasize having a number for LLL and an LC handy, make sure her mate is taking as much time as possible off from work, drink more fluid than you ever thought your body could consume (besides the nursing you really need to flush the anesthesia out of your system), and be prepared for post-op chills, shakes, and tears. Even if a c/sec is truly medically necessary, being strapped down and watching your baby be lifted out of you as you lie there helpless and freezing (in an operating room full of strangers babbling about golf) can be emotionally devastating. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>CrunchyParent</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8175352"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Any great suggestions other than mother's milk tea and the like to avoid supply issues with a scheduled c-s?</div>
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Other than the rest of the list? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br>
Seriously, I've found most of those suggestions time and time again, in almost every source concerned with nursing after c-section. I am thankful that I was able to remember them when it came time for me to have mine--I wasn't emotionally prepared to do it, but knew that breastfeeding was the best thing I could do under the circumstances. Keeping baby skin-to-skin was a huge priority for me as that not only keeps the baby warm (sometimes a problem with babies born surgically) but helps clue my body in to make milk for him.<br><br>
Everything I've ever read points to a correlation between length of pregnancy and how quickly the milk comes in. This appears to be true not only for c-sections but also for inductions. If you already have two DC, then you have a fairly good idea of how long you tend to cook babies. I'd aim for that, if possible. When it comes to baby cooking, I'm a crock pot--DD was at about 43 weeks and DS was about 42.
 

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i agree with all pp's. only thing i'd add is to try side-lying position also. this one worked great for me after c-s. football hold was way too difficult for me to manage with the painkillers, even tho i kept them to a minimum. we just nap-nursed most of the day. and get lots of pillows! i think i managed to cram six or seven into the bed with us, and all away from babe. the nurses told me they 'didn't recommend' co-sleeping but they didn't make me stop. i couldn't sleep without him close by, anyway.<br><br>
oh, yeah, and if for some reason they can't do what they need to with the babe in the room, bug the heck out of them until they bring babe back. as in, every five minutes. ring the nurse, say 'can i have my baby back now please?' and 'make sure he's not getting any bottles please', and then five minutes later do it again. they kept saying that they'd keep him in the nursery to 'give me a break.' i kept telling them i couldn't relax until i had my babe with me.<br><br>
keep bf'ing, esp. thru jaundice. they will try to supplement. tell friend to stick to her guns!
 

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Wow! I really wish I had had a thread like this before I had my c-s with ds.<br><br>
I don't think anyone has mentioned this one yet...<br><br>
Have her make sure her dh or support person is 100% on board with her. After the surgery, I was very groggy and depressed, and let the nurses bully me into things like having ds taken to the nursery the first night. They scared dh silly--he didn't know very much about jaundice, apgar scores, weight loss... all that medical stuff they throw at you to scare you into compliance. I really needed him to be my eyes, ears, hands and feet while I was out of it, but he wasn't well prepared.<br><br>
Also, he needs to really know about bf. If possible, find another mom of a young baby and spend some time with her so he will know what it's really like.
 
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