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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is better for my families health? What is better for the environment?<br><br>
Is it better to use up what we have left of certain bath products or throw them out?<br><br>
Should we reuse plastic bottles to store our homemade products or buy new containers?<br><br>
Clothes...buy new organic or buy used? Bedding? Towels?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Anyone?
 

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I'll bite...<br><br>
Plastic isn't a good way to store anything, if I had to choose and I had extra $$ I'd buy glass jars for everything (or be using jars food comes in), especially if I spent the time and $$ on quality homemade products. Of course, I can so I have plenty of those jars around to use.<br><br>
Recycle that plastic at your local recycling area.<br><br>
As for the stuff you have, I can't say anything much b/c I don't know what it is that you have. If it is antibacterial throw it out to the land fill, not the drain and don't look back. Any other products, well, if I felt it were okay to use I'd use it up and as I stated recycle the plastic at a recycle area if one is available. Deodorant/ Antiper ditch it, it isn't worth the harm it does to your body to continue with it till it's gone.<br><br>
The stuff you have you might want to keep around while you perfect your new system. Say or batch of soap is a dud, well what are you going to do?<br><br>
As for organic clothing etc, buy what you can used for the sake of $$, but as I've recently read in an organic food thread, buying new would promote the need and demand for organic textiles.
 

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If you like the bath products and haven't found any information about those specific products being harmful, set them aside while you try natural versions of those products. As Electra said, you may find that the first one you try doesn't work for you, so it's good to have a fall-back option, esp. if you're on a budget and can't keep buying new brands right away. I recommend changing your soap first (Dr. Bronner's is wonderful--and more affordable than it seems, because it's highly concentrated) and then changing deodorant and other products; when your body is accustomed to harsh soaps, natural deodorants and such seem not to work as well.<br><br>
I think plastic bottles are fine for cleaning products, but check the type of plastic (number in triangle on bottom): #1, #2, and #5 are pretty safe, but #3 and #6 release dangerous chemicals esp. into oily or hot substances, and #7 is "other" which could be anything! (#4 is only used for bags, not bottles and cups.) Definitely stop using any bottle that appears to be deteriorating, i.e. going from clear to cloudy.<br><br>
For food storage, try to use glass or ceramic. They're easier to wash anyway. I really like the Corningware food storage containers w/plastic lids--if you don't fill them too full, the plastic doesn't touch your food, and you can microwave food right in the container. I also use glass jars from nut butter, spaghetti sauce, etc., to store leftovers.<br><br>
As far as textiles, when you can find used things that fit your needs, that's probably easier on the environment than even the most responsibly-made new stuff. When you do buy new, buy organic or at least unbleached as much as you can. Remember that many of the harmful chemicals in non-organic cloth come out gradually with washing and airing, so used textiles are better for your health than non-organic new ones and may not be any worse than new organic.
 
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