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I buy rice in bulk 50-lb bags. It is long-grain rice. It gets really sticky when I cook it. It clumps together. How can I avoid this?<br><br>
Thanks!<br><br>
dm
 

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how are you cooking it??<br><br>
what type is it?? That makes a big difference.<br><br>
g.
 

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Rinse it first. Use less water.<br><br>
The longer you cook the rice, the stickier it will get, as the starches leach into the water more and more. That's how you make rice pudding.<br><br>
If you like every grain to be separate, I have a friend who cooks rice like pasta, boil it in plenty of water until done, then dump it into a colander and let it drain.
 

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Some of us prefer it sticky... if you're buying it at asian markets. Stickiness is valued because it's easier to eat with chopsticks.<br><br>
But in general, if you use less water, it won't be sticky.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm not sure exactly what type of rice it is! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> It's just a 50-pound bag of long-grain rice.<br><br>
I have found that, if I cook it in the one-cup-rice-two-cups-water formula of white rice, it doesn't get tender enough.<br><br>
I did rinse it yesterday, and it was better.<br><br>
Thanks!<br><br>
dm
 

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I've noticed the same thing, I bought a big bag of jasmine rice, it was in a sack with chinese characters all over it so there are no cooking directions.<br>
It's delicious but always a bit sticky. We actually like it that way, but I've always wondered why it's so sticky!
 

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I've recently started using this method to get perfectly 'steamed' rice without any funky equipment or requirements, it takes a little more work than just throwing 2 cups water in with 1 cup rice and leaving it, but it's not much effort and very worth it!<br><br>
What you need<br>
Long-grain rice - 1 cup<br><br>
Water - 1.5 cups<br><br>
How to make it<br>
First, you need to wash off the excess starch from the rice. This will prevent it from making a sticky mess. Put the rice in a deep bowl, and in your sink, run cold tap water over it. Once the bowl is full of water, use your fingers to swish the rice around. The water will start getting murky. Now gently pour this water out. Repeat this process till the water is mostly clear. This will take at least 4-5 washes.<br><br>
Now fill it up one last time. Don't wash the rice again. Just leave it in there, covered with water, for about 30 minutes or so. Why am I doing this? I freely admit I'm still trying to figure out the science behind it, but it results in a much fuller, softer grain. After the soaking, you will notice that the rice grains have turned a nice milky white.<br><br>
OK, let's drain the water out carefully again. Try and get as much water out of the bowl as you can without pouring out the rice grains as well. This takes patience.<br><br>
(All this isn't as complicated as it's beginning to sound. I just like to ensure I've covered everything.)<br><br>
On to cooking the rice...<br><br>
Put the rice in a heavy-gauge pan that has a flat bottom. This bit is important. If your pan is made out of some thin flimsy metal, your rice will get nicely burnt at the bottom while the grains at the top may not cook properly. You also need one with a tight lid, or else the precious steam will leak and your rice won't cook right. Many Indian homes have vessels that have a concave bottom. These will just not work. The flat bottom is required.<br><br>
Now put in the water. Normally, a long-grain rice recipe calls for twice the amount of water as rice. Why then are we using only 1.5 cups of water? Because our rice has already been sitting in some water for a while, and has absorbed a bit of it. Moreoever, there is still some leftover water after you drained it, because no one can drain it absolutely dry.<br><br>
I like to add 1/2 teaspoon salt to the rice, but most Asian recipes don't salt the rice. This is your choice.<br><br>
Put the pan on medium high heat. Wait till the water boils and starts bubbling. Now turn the heat down as low as you can, cover with the tight lid, and let it just sit there for about 15-20 minutes. Resist the urge to lift the lid and peek at the rice. No, I'm sorry, you can't have even one peek! If you do that, I will rap you on the knuckles with a cane, you hear?<br><br>
After the 15-20 minutes is up, turn off the heat. No, you still can't lift the lid. Now you have to let it "stand" for another 10 minutes or so. This will help the rice to "settle" so you don't have dry grains on top and wet grains at the bottom.<br><br>
After 10 minutes, lift the lid, admire the rice (yes, it will look that good), take a fork and fluff the rice. You will have nice separate grains without having used any oil, butter, or other fat in the cooking process.<br><br>
Your rice is ready to serve with whatever you choose. I recommend a nice Thai red curry with chicken and some stir-fried veggies.<br><br>
This method of cooking rice is known as the "absorption method".
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Abarat</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8195241"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">First, you need to wash off the excess starch from the rice. This will prevent it from making a sticky mess. Put the rice in a deep bowl, and in your sink, run cold tap water over it. Once the bowl is full of water, use your fingers to swish the rice around. The water will start getting murky. Now gently pour this water out. Repeat this process till the water is mostly clear. This will take at least 4-5 washes.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
We use a fancy schmancy rice cooker, but this step is critical for white rice (unless you want it sticky). You can purchase pre-rinsed rice, but it's more expensive.
 

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The way I was taught to make rice (using a rice cooker or the boil-then-cover&simmer-on-stovetop method) is to fill the pot with your rice, then rinse it thoroughly 5-6 times. Then, add enough water to cover the rice to the depth of the first knuckle on your thumb. This works for me every time. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 
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