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Absolutely love it. It teaches true understanding. It teaches the tricks and shortcuts that we don't figure out on our own til we are adults. My son understands numbers more than his peers, I believe. We finished B this year and he tested high second grade level at the end. Overall it's fun, it's very age appropriate, low on worksheets and busywork. The games make learning fun, too....no 'drills'...they learn things by applying them in the games. I will be doing A & C this coming year with my two oldest. I suppose the only 'negative' I can think of is it is time consuming, in that because your child is not doing workbooks and whatnot on their own -- you are teaching, playing games, etc. That said, spending time with my kid is not a negative.
However, this year, as DD1 gets into the games, DS can start playing them with her...so he gets more review, and I don't have to do ALL the game playing...kwim? I always recommend this program.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Was it hard to get past the way they teach numbers? That's my main concern... Isn't something like "2 ten 1" is 21?
 

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No. They only do that in the beginning, and it really helps the kids understand what the numbers mean at first. Twenty-1 doesn't say what it is....2-ten 1 says the 2 is in the tens place, and 1 is in the ones....does that makes sense? When your child does RS, they will have a very good grasp of place value, which is important. And they understand what place value means, not just memorize it. Partway through RS B (haven't done A yet) they move into the traditional way of numbering. Obviously your child will hear the other way in day-to-day life, but if in math you stress the RS way of naming some numbers, it will go a long way in their math understanding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've been emailing with Dr Cotter about Right Start because I was uncertain if my dd would be too young to start. She said that I should start early so I think I'm set on Right Start Level A for Sept curriculum! Thanks for helping!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Oh one more question: which package did you get for Level A? The standard one or deluxe with the additional manipulatives?
 

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I'm using level A with my 6 y.o. DD. It has it's ups and downs for us honestly. I love the way it teaches math though, so we are sticking with it. The hardest part for us is that it requires so much direct instruction. My DD hates that. I don't mind sitting down and spending time on it, but she is the type of kid that wants to discover everything on her own. She doesn't want me telling her any shortcuts or how to do anything unless she asks. She's also very artistically minded, so she often spends lots of time making art with the manipulatives. I try to relax about it, not be in any hurry, but it is frustrating to me. I think it is working a million times better than any textbook/workbook program would have. I bought the set with all the manipulatives because we are starting at the beginning and will likely stick with it so I figured I'd get the whole thing. I also have a 3 y.o. and I can keep all the stuff and use it with her too. Hardly any of it is consumable, so that is awesome
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by kgianforti View Post
I've been emailing with Dr Cotter about Right Start because I was uncertain if my dd would be too young to start. She said that I should start early so I think I'm set on Right Start Level A for Sept curriculum! Thanks for helping!
Thanks for posting this. Would you update if you think about it once you start in Sept? I've been wondering about this. My DS1 is three- today!- and I keep reading that RS is best to start by five or earlier and I was wondering what "earlier" is. I spoke with a rep at convention and she was the mother of five boys (claimed a PhD in boys
) and seemed to discourage anything before six. I thought that was odd considering what I've read from RS's website: that it's better to start before a child develops a reliance on certain ways of counting, solving simple problems, etc. I think the hand-on/manipulative and the way this program approaches math would be better to start earlier...totally different in my mind than workbooks, KWIM?

Does anyone else have thoughts on this for preschoolers? I don't think I'd want to start this fall, but maybe Dec/Jan and take it very easy, stretching out Level A over two years, possibly.
 

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We are just finishing level B with my second going to be third grader and will start level C after. We love it...it is more time consuming than other programs, but it does such a nice job of teaching the concepts in a way that I believe will stick with my kids for life. We started with this when my dd was nearly 7...and it's working fine...however, she did attend a montessori school through kindergarten and the approach was somewhat similar. At first I found it difficult to think of numbers like 21, as 2-ten-1 but it really cemented dd's understanding of place value and once they get that there is no problem switching back to the traditional names.

I have Level A and started it just for fun last year with my 4 year old but he was not ready for anything formal and though he initially wanted to do it (because his sister was and the manipulatives are so great) he became very resistant, so we put it away. He will take out the manipulatives and "do math" by himself sometimes and we will restart this fall (he will be 5.5) because he is expressing a lot of interest in having "his math" again. Level A is nice and slow..with short lessons and you can slow it down further, if you need.

Oh...we don't do math every day...3 or 4 days a week. In fact, we took a couple of months off (traveling and then moving back from overseas) and after a couple of days review, dd was right back at it...she really *knew* what she had been learning, even with a break. The card games are so much more fun than worksheets, imo.

chandra fischer
mama to G(8, next week) and O (5)
 

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Has everyone found the RS placement questionnaire to be accurate? I did it for DD, age five, who's had no formal math instruction other than me helping her learn her numbers 1-10 and other super basic stuff ("You know there are four when you see two and two, so you don't have to count it"... stuff like that). The questionaire said she should be in level B, but only if I answer that she can't read, but is an "advanced child". The thing is, how do I know if she's advanced? Everyone is constantly telling us how smart she is, but I think people just do that to everyone, don't they? I know she has a large vocabulary for her age and she seems to know a lot more than a lot of kids her age, but...how do I know? I'm her mom, of course she seems smart to me. lol I don't want to get A if it's too easy for her, because RS certainly isn't cheap, but I don't want to get B if it's too hard, either.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Plummeting View Post
Has everyone found the RS placement questionnaire to be accurate? I did it for DD, age five, who's had no formal math instruction other than me helping her learn her numbers 1-10 and other super basic stuff ("You know there are four when you see two and two, so you don't have to count it"... stuff like that). The questionaire said she should be in level B, but only if I answer that she can't read, but is an "advanced child". The thing is, how do I know if she's advanced? Everyone is constantly telling us how smart she is, but I think people just do that to everyone, don't they? I know she has a large vocabulary for her age and she seems to know a lot more than a lot of kids her age, but...how do I know? I'm her mom, of course she seems smart to me. lol I don't want to get A if it's too easy for her, because RS certainly isn't cheap, but I don't want to get B if it's too hard, either.
I saw the RS people at a homeschooling conference and they told me to buy level B because it has all the information from level A in it - it just goes faster. So in your case, I would definitely say level B. DS will be six in July and we're doing a lesson a day (or the timeframe given for each lesson) and it's working great. We'd done a little bit of math here and there prior to this, but nothing formal. Just counting and stuff. If it's too fast, you can always do each lesson over two or more days. The pace is really up to you. And we're only spending about 15 minutes a day on it, not 45 like some people say. I just review the stuff from previous lessons on my own and show him the new material and go along at the pace that works for ds. He likes it and is doing very well.
 

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The placement issue kind of irritates me because I went by the online survey, and got A for my 6 yr old. She wasn't reading at all (then) and I don't consider her advanced in math. But I think we might have been better off with B.

What is the advantage of plodding through level A, if level B covers the same stuff and more? Is level A mostly made for really young kids that can't wait to start math? I assumed level A would give her a good base, and I just figured we should start at the beginning since she hadn't had much math at all. I pulled her from kindergarten in Feb, so we started mid year, and aren't even half-way through A.

I wonder if I should just quit level A and start B instead? Are we just wasting time on A? We often skip some of the warm ups anyway because she hates review...then I lose her attention because she's bored, and it uses up her limited patience for direct instruction. Any opinions?
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by LucyRev View Post
The placement issue kind of irritates me because I went by the online survey, and got A for my 6 yr old. She wasn't reading at all (then) and I don't consider her advanced in math. But I think we might have been better off with B.

What is the advantage of plodding through level A, if level B covers the same stuff and more? Is level A mostly made for really young kids that can't wait to start math? I assumed level A would give her a good base, and I just figured we should start at the beginning since she hadn't had much math at all. I pulled her from kindergarten in Feb, so we started mid year, and aren't even half-way through A.

I wonder if I should just quit level A and start B instead? Are we just wasting time on A? We often skip some of the warm ups anyway because she hates review...then I lose her attention because she's bored, and it uses up her limited patience for direct instruction. Any opinions?
This is the kind of thing I worry about. I don't think that DD's particularly advanced, as she has trouble consistently even recognizing certain numbers, but she does do a lot of single digit addition in her head, whenever she wants to know something. Is that advanced or not, for a 5-year-old? lol
 

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LucyRev, I would stick with it. Level B has the same things but more abbreviated, from what I understand.

Quite honestly, I do the parts that interest my son and stop when his interest runs out. We don't do the songs. I do my own review. I just look over the page and what concepts are being taught and then teach them live with my son the way he seems to respond best. If he isn't getting a concept, I drill on it more. If he already gets something, I spend less time on it.

So basically, I read the lesson, figure out what they're trying to accomplish and then work toward the end result with my son. I'm sure if we did every single thing whether we needed to or not, we could spend a good 45 minutes or more on it and we'd hate it. I am very tuned in to my son's interest level as we do things. If he starts to get frustrated, we quit and come back the next day. If he's starting to not pay attention, I figure he's bored, so we stop and come back the next day. I just look at the different activities as a resource of ideas for getting a concept across and we choose the ones that work best for us.

The curriculum serves me - I am not a slave to it.

So I would keep going - just make it work for you. When you get to level B, if you've done Level A they tell you which lessons you can skip. I think Level A is geared for younger kids so you can get them on the right track sooner so it's simpler and easier. Going directly to Level B works if you've already done some math and are switching methods - they already know many of the concepts and you are just introducing a different approach.

Sorry if I'm rambling. It's early and my kids are a bit crazy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by Zuzu822 View Post
Thanks for posting this. Would you update if you think about it once you start in Sept?

Does anyone else have thoughts on this for preschoolers? I don't think I'd want to start this fall, but maybe Dec/Jan and take it very easy, stretching out Level A over two years, possibly.
I will TRY TRY TRY to remember!!! Based on a few of the posts, I think Level A will be actually a good fit for my dd. I was worried that she was too young but then I was worried that she was getting "set" in her way of counting especially since she's starting to add and subtract.

Actually when I took the online survey, it said we should start with Level B but I wasn't comfortable with that. SOOOO....we will see!!!
 

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I love hearing everyone's experiences. Thanks for your rambling, Pageta
It was very helpful! I have been a "slave to the curriculum" and I think I will try your style. I bet it will be much better.
 

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We are loving it. I found it on sale for second hand so I ended up getting level A while I had planned on starting with level B (my son is 6). It is significantly easy for him (but he is advanced in most areas) but that is alright because I am using it to teach his little sister (almost 4) at the same time.

They both ABSOLUTELY love it. I plan on blogging about it in the next few days.
 

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We are slowly working through Level A with my young 5'er, and are thrilled with it.
Level A is 76 lessons (Ithink) and the first 20 lessons of Level B cover all of Level A.
 
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