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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, mamas! I'm currently pg with #3, but posting with thoughts of my sister. She's 29 and likely will be married in the next year. They definitely want children. In addition to the many health problems she's dealt with over her lifetime, my mom is quite concerned about her trying to have children in her 30s. Ideally they'd have a couple of years of marriage before children, too, so she'd probably be 32+ before conceiving.<br><br>
So what are the REAL risks? I tend to blow of the "I'm too old" sorts of arguments from people who are 35 or whatever, as just being silly. Like there should be some arbitrary age at which point one should no longer get pg! But I realize there are (supposedly) some real concerns. I'm just not sure what of them are still considered valid at this point, especially in light of more natural living ways.<br><br>
I'd appreciate any input, hopefully to help put my mother's mind at ease! Statistics would be fabulous.<br><br>
Thanks!
 

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I am pregnant with my first at age 35, and I am being treated as a low risk pregnancy so far (2nd tri). From what I have read, there are 3 areas that are potentially complicated by maternal age. First, there is getting pregnant in the first place. This had me massively freaked out, I now believe needlessly. When you look at the stats, it does get harder every year after 34, substantially harder every year after 40, and even harder every year after 42. That said, we hit the jackpot on my first first cycle (second cycle off the Pill). Years of anxiety over nothing. Second, there are certain conditions (e.g., Downs) that are more likely with older pregnant women. However, to my mind, those do not reach a high number (greater than the risk of loss by amnio) until age 42. (Those ages are the ages at birth, I think.) Third, you will see a lot of other discussion of other "complications" in older women (gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia leading to pre-term labor), but those factors are usually explained away by factors that are more likely to be present in older women, e.g., higher weight and higher pre-pregnancy blood pressure.
 

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What the pp said! Really though, as long as you don't have fertility issues, a person who is healthy & fit (but older) is really a better risk than someone younger, but not in as good of a shape. I had my 1st DD at 38, & am due w/our 2nd 2 months before I turn 40. No complications w/the 1st preg. & birth, so far, so good, w/the 2nd! I'm a bit overweight, but otherwise very healthy, & have always been very physically active.
 

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<div style="font-style:italic;">Second, there are certain conditions (e.g., Downs) that are more likely with older pregnant women. However, to my mind, those do not reach a high number (greater than the risk of loss by amnio) until age 42. (Those ages are the ages at birth, I think.)</div>
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I'm due to have this baby when I'm 42 so I've looked at the numbers recently. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"> The risk of loss by amnio is about 1/300. The risk of having a baby with Down syndrome at age 42 is about 1/60. At age 40, the risk is about 1/100. At age 35, the risk is about 1/400.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks so much, ladies! My sister is in good physical shape as far as conditioning right now, and I expect she'll continue that indefinitely. She's had issues with pretty much every other system, though, including cardiac problems and sensory issues. But to look at her right now, you'd never know! (At least most of the time.)<br><br>
I am very hopeful for her that she'll have no problems at all. I know she recently saw an OB for a thorough check and they found no issues that should affect her fertility, though of course I know that's not a guarantee.<br><br>
I'm glad that the numbers are as relatively low as they are! May you all have healthy, safe pregnancies, as well!
 
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