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I lurk here a lot, because I enjoy reading what you ladies have to say. As a low income mother myself, however, I feel that some of your efforts are aimed at the wrong things. I am not writing this to stir up trouble, but instead to maybe help some of you see into exactly what the roadblocks are for low income women, and how we can make change happen.<br><br>
Many people say that breastfeeding is free... while that may be true for the middle class stay at home mom, it is far from free for your single, working, low income mom. consider this. You are pregnant, you go into say target to shop for your upcoming arrival. You know that you will be returing to work shortly after your baby is born, and that you need to have a decent pump to pump 2-3 times a day. You notice that the pump that has come highly recommended costs about 350 dollars...You realize that you will be unable to purchase a pump, that costs as much as you make in an entire week. So you talk to the WIC staff, and they state that they cant help you unless you have a preemie, and then they only provide a pump for you while your baby is in the NICU. Then you decide to check out the nursing bra selection. You notice that decent bra, is going to cost you at least 20 dollars, and you will need at least 3 of those.... so thats another 60. Nursing pads appear to be pretty expensive too, a good size box will cost you about 10 dollars. You wonder how often you will need to buy a box... once a week? Thats 40 dollars a month. Then you realize, that if you will be pumping, you will need bottles, and storage containers. You notice the container of breast cream as you are leaving the feeding section. You leave the store with some infant clothes, and a few other things, and bypass the feeding issue completly. On monday, you decide to discuss with your boss where you can pump and when once you return to work. He tells you the only place they have would be the bathroom, and that they dont have anywhere for you to store your milk or to wash your pump. He also says they cannot provide anymore breaks than you normally would get, and you quickly realize not only would this task be almost impossible with a high quality pump, but certainly you dont feel you would even have the time to try and pump using the manual pump you thought you might buy that was in your budget. To further the frustration, you dont know anyone who has ever successfully nursed, and the baby's father is very againsed breastfeeding.<br><br>
You go back to the store the following weekend, and purchase a set of newborn bottles, a bottle brush, and some pacifiers. The total bill comes to 40 dollars, and you make the final descision to formula feed.<br><br>
Here is my story, On what happend to me with my first daughter who is now 16 months old.<br><br>
I was absolutly dead set on breastfeeding. I made up a birth plan which consisted of very plainly stating that my baby was not to be given any bottles, or pacifiers, was to be rooming in, and was to be placed on my chest after delivery, and that all newborn procedures should be postpond until after my baby had nursed. I had a midwife, and chose to deliver at the hospital in my area that had the lowest percentage of interventions. I ended up with an induction, epidural, the whole thing.<br><br>
Come to find out, I had flat nipples. I tried for an hour to get my screaming baby to latch. No success. A nurse brought a nipple sheild, and stated that there was no lactation consultants available on weekends (I delivered on a saturday, was released 24 hours later on a sunday)<br><br>
When my baby was constantly screaming, getting rashes, pooping out blood, and I got mastitis, I called WIC in hopes they had a lactation consultant that could help me. One spoke to me on the phone briefly for about 5 minutes, but said that she would not be able to see me in person. I called Le leche league, and talked to a group leader on the phone, and she stated that she wouldnt be able to help me in person either. (not unless I came to a meeting, that was 2 months away) In desperation, I took my baby to the emergency room. The emergency room diagnosed her with "constipation" and suggested I give her a bottle with caro syrup in it. I did and she threw it all up. Out of desperation once more, I took her to the pediatrician who told me to switch her to formula. There was no talk about how to help me nurse without the sheild, there was no talk about modifying my diet. I played the switching formula game for several months, and discovered that my baby was not only allergic to soy but also the "hypoallergenic" formula. My daughter spend countless days sick with ear infections, and was hospitalized for dehydration.<br><br>
I am currently pregnant with my second child, due in July. The hospital I am delivering at has a high rate of cesareans, but they have a lactation consultant on call 24/7. I have also spoke with a public health nurse who breastfed all her children and will be willing to help me, actually come to my house and tell me if my baby is ok. Will it work this time? I sure hope so.<br><br>
So what can YOU as lactivists do to help low income mothers initiate and continue breastfeeding?<br><br>
Push for less funding on formula and juice (I get so much juice in a month, it is covering almost an entire shelf in my pantry... I could never drink that much!) and more on lactation consultants (both at WIC and in the hospital) and for help purchasing a decent pump.<br><br>
No mother should be discharged from the hospital without seeing a lactation consultant, especially if she has an issue like flat nipples.<br><br>
More eductation on breastfeeding for OB nurses. At least two of the nurses I had just kept pushing my daughters face into my boob, and really had very little knowledge about breastfeeding at all.<br><br>
Help for struggling Le leche league groups. The group in my area only has a meeting every other month.<br><br>
Breastfeeding education for men. If these mothers had the support of the baby's father, maybe that would make the difference for them.<br><br>
Push for incentives for company's that employ low wage workers to be pumping friendly.<br><br>
Again, I am not here to start trouble, but instead of focusing completly on what the movie stars are doing, or the formula companies, or what happens when you nurse in public (and I am sure that doing those things does help to a point) focus on getting mothers the help and support they need! This could make a huge difference, especially when such a high percentage of new mothers are in the WIC program.
 

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Absolutely. I was on assistance as well when DS#1 was born...it can be very rough when you're just a number. I think you're right in that the right support system can (and does) mean the difference between breastfeeding and not. I was lucky enough to have family who supported me. I also had to make due with zero maternity clothes (unzipped my pants and wore longer, usually men's button down shirts), one nursing bra and a manual pump. I stuffed tissue into my bra and would push really hard against the nipple to keep the milk from coming out since I couldn't afford pads...THANK GOODNESS my mother breastfed or else I wouldn't have known what to do...pretty much everyone else, including my doctor had no clue...<br><br>
We are definately active in getting less of a formula push...one of the moms on here was instrumental in getting the 'formula bags' (the ones you get for free when you leave) out of the hospitals in Maryland. This is difficult in that formula companies usually are not 'just' formula companies and can wield quite a bit of political power. It can be frustrating.<br><br>
I think you'll find that there are many women here who are or were low income when they had their children. Right now it may seem our focus is elsewhere, but legislation in the states still doesn't even protect breastfeeding mothers. This means that women like yourself, after pushing and trying and beating the odds are now being berated when trying to feed their children, even at state offices. If breastfeeding is still 'obscene', we are butting our heads against a wall trying to get politicians to find new ways to support it....they are already not supporting mothers who are...much less new moms. Support is simply not there. That is what we're trying to change now. Get the laws out there. Make businesses accountable. Make breastfeeding acceptable. THEN we can push for policy changes in the large 'assistance' wheel...like WIC for example.<br><br>
Please don't think I'm disagreeing, I'm not. I agree with pretty much every word you typed. I just think we're all trying to go to the same place, just taking different routes.<br><br>
P.S- Welcome!
 

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"So you talk to the WIC staff, and they state that they cant help you unless you have a preemie, and then they only provide a pump for you while your baby is in the NICU."<br><br>
My WIC provided me with an Ameda Purely Yours for me to keep. They didn't hassle me at all. Theres always cheap used pumps at craigslist.com, most of the time they've hardly been used.<br><br>
"Then you decide to check out the nursing bra selection. You notice that decent bra, is going to cost you at least 20 dollars, and you will need at least 3 of those.... so thats another 60."<br><br>
I don't even use a nursing bra. Having one isn't a neccesity.<br><br><br>
"Nursing pads appear to be pretty expensive too, a good size box will cost you about 10 dollars. You wonder how often you will need to buy a box... once a week? Thats 40 dollars a month."<br><br>
I only had to use nursing pads for about a month pp. After my milk supply established I stopped leaking. You can always use wash cloths.<br><br>
"Then you realize, that if you will be pumping, you will need bottles, and storage containers."<br><br>
Check out Craigslist.com. You can always sterilize them. These are included in the higher priced pumps anyway; no seperate purchase.<br><br>
"You notice the container of breast cream as you are leaving the feeding section."<br><br>
I never had to use the Lanisoh after the first few weeks pp.<br><br>
"On monday, you decide to discuss with your boss where you can pump and when once you return to work. He tells you the only place they have would be the bathroom, and that they dont have anywhere for you to store your milk or to wash your pump. He also says they cannot provide anymore breaks than you normally would get, and you quickly realize not only would this task be almost impossible with a high quality pump, but certainly you dont feel you would even have the time to try and pump using the manual pump you thought you might buy that was in your budget."<br><br>
I am sorry to hear this. What state do you live in? Some states have laws stating that they have to let you pump.<br><br><br>
"To further the frustration, you dont know anyone who has ever successfully nursed, and the baby's father is very againsed breastfeeding."<br><br>
I never knew anyone who breastfed before I met my inlaws. And just educate your boyfriend. I am sorry he doesn't support your decisions.<br><br>
"You go back to the store the following weekend, and purchase a set of newborn bottles, a bottle brush, and some pacifiers."<br><br>
bottle brushes are cheap and you don't need pacifiers. you don't need any extra bottles then what comes with the pump.<br><br>
It's definitley a challenge but that's what parenting is all about. I would still breastfeed if I were in your shoes. I would NEVER EVER bottlefeed. Even if I had to live in the projects and be on food stamps. I am not rich, not even middle class. My husband works nights at a factory job and we live in the ghetto. If I worked our income would double. It's just not worth it to me. My life isn't "my life" anymore since I drug my dd into this world. It is her RIGHT as a human being to be fed human milk, and I will let no obstacle prevent me from that. If you are looking for someone to tell you,"Formula feeding might be best in your case", then you will not find it here. Not from me. Women have made sacrifices bigger than you can think of to ensure their children are given mother's milk. It might be a sacrifice but it is worth it. I sympathize with you, but I think you could make it happen if you really wanted to.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>momma2libby</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7944012"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">"So you talk to the WIC staff, and they state that they cant help you unless you have a preemie, and then they only provide a pump for you while your baby is in the NICU."<br><br>
My WIC provided me with an Ameda Purely Yours for me to keep. They didn't hassle me at all. Theres always cheap used pumps at craigslist.com, most of the time they've hardly been used.<br><br>
"Then you decide to check out the nursing bra selection. You notice that decent bra, is going to cost you at least 20 dollars, and you will need at least 3 of those.... so thats another 60."<br><br>
I don't even use a nursing bra. Having one isn't a neccesity.<br><br><br>
"Nursing pads appear to be pretty expensive too, a good size box will cost you about 10 dollars. You wonder how often you will need to buy a box... once a week? Thats 40 dollars a month."<br><br>
I only had to use nursing pads for about a month pp. After my milk supply established I stopped leaking. You can always use wash cloths.<br><br>
"Then you realize, that if you will be pumping, you will need bottles, and storage containers."<br><br>
Check out Craigslist.com. You can always sterilize them. These are included in the higher priced pumps anyway; no seperate purchase.<br><br>
"You notice the container of breast cream as you are leaving the feeding section."<br><br>
I never had to use the Lanisoh after the first few weeks pp.<br><br>
"On monday, you decide to discuss with your boss where you can pump and when once you return to work. He tells you the only place they have would be the bathroom, and that they dont have anywhere for you to store your milk or to wash your pump. He also says they cannot provide anymore breaks than you normally would get, and you quickly realize not only would this task be almost impossible with a high quality pump, but certainly you dont feel you would even have the time to try and pump using the manual pump you thought you might buy that was in your budget."<br><br>
I am sorry to hear this. What state do you live in? Some states have laws stating that they have to let you pump.<br><br><br>
"To further the frustration, you dont know anyone who has ever successfully nursed, and the baby's father is very againsed breastfeeding."<br><br>
I never knew anyone who breastfed before I met my inlaws. And just educate your boyfriend. I am sorry he doesn't support your decisions.<br><br>
"You go back to the store the following weekend, and purchase a set of newborn bottles, a bottle brush, and some pacifiers."<br><br>
bottle brushes are cheap and you don't need pacifiers. you don't need any extra bottles then what comes with the pump.<br><br>
It's definitley a challenge but that's what parenting is all about. I would still breastfeed if I were in your shoes. I would NEVER EVER bottlefeed. Even if I had to live in the projects and be on food stamps. I am not rich, not even middle class. My husband works nights at a factory job and we live in the ghetto. If I worked our income would double. It's just not worth it to me. My life isn't "my life" anymore since I drug my dd into this world. It is her RIGHT as a human being to be fed human milk, and I will let no obstacle prevent me from that. If you are looking for someone to tell you,"Formula feeding might be best in your case", then you will not find it here. Not from me. Women have made sacrifices bigger than you can think of to ensure their children are given mother's milk. It might be a sacrifice but it is worth it. I sympathize with you, but I think you could make it happen if you really wanted to.</div>
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I am not looking for anything. My daughter was breastfed for a short time... yes. I am fully intending on breastfeeding this baby. I am due in July. As stated in my post, I am only trying to help fellow lactivists understand the roadblocks many mothers face, and how we can help them. I would also like to point out, that many low income mothers dont speak english, or dont have access to computers, so craigslist wouldnt be an option. I live in washington state... but you know as well as I do that just because there is a law concerning breastfeeding, people arent necisarily going to follow it, especially if the mother is un educated or is afraid of losing her job etc. Many low income mothers dont even know they have rights.<br><br>
Furthermore, I was using the story about the mother who goes to target and has an unsupportive boyfriend as an example. I am a single mother and neither of my childrens fathers are involved in their lives. That story was not specifially about me. The one later on in my post about my 16 month old daughter is.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>momma2libby</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7944012"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><br>
My WIC provided me with an Ameda Purely Yours for me to keep. They didn't hassle me at all. Theres always cheap used pumps at craigslist.com, most of the time they've hardly been used.<br></div>
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Just because the wic on your area provides a decent breastpump does not mean that every WIC in the country does. IMO it seems important to me if you are going to be a lactivist, to know that there are WIC offices that offer very little help to new mothers. I invite you to call my local WIC office and inquire about whether they provide pumps. Especially the kind you are referencing. They dont. I live in Benton county washington.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>attachedmamaof3</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7943857"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">P.S- Welcome!</div>
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thank you! I hope to be on here more often especially when I have my baby in July. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>faithinrosie223</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7944236"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Just because the wic on your area provides a decent breastpump does not mean that every WIC in the country does. IMO it seems important to me if you are going to be a lactivist, to know that there are WIC offices that offer very little help to new mothers. I invite you to call my local WIC office and inquire about whether they provide pumps. Especially the kind you are referencing. They dont. I live in Benton county washington.</div>
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Have YOU called recently? Just because they didn't have them the last time you had a child doesn't mean that they won't have them now. I've heard that the WIC offices have become more breastfeeding friendly all over the country in the past few years. I looked at Washington's WIC website and it says that they support breastfeeding by: "Funding purchases of breast pumps and equipment needed by women who are breastfeeding." <a href="http://www.doh.wa.gov/cfh/WIC/BFpromo.htm" target="_blank">http://www.doh.wa.gov/cfh/WIC/BFpromo.htm</a><br><br>
If you call your county's WIC office and they turn you down you should bring this up and demand a pump.<br><br>
More positive breastfeeding links from your state's WIC office:<br><a href="http://www.doh.wa.gov/cfh/WIC/breastfeeding.htm" target="_blank">http://www.doh.wa.gov/cfh/WIC/breastfeeding.htm</a>
 

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ITA with you, as I am low-income (currently no income, whole 'nother story...) as well. However, I am the type of person that will do something just to prove a person wrong, and everyone of course said I'd never be able to breastfeed.<br><br>
I could just about have written your story...the first half anyhow. Hospital birth, flat nipples, really bad LC, had to get online help with weaning from the shield.<br><br>
In our area, "pregnancy" medicaid will pay for you to rent a pump. However, three weeks after I gave birth, the only pharmacy in town that rented them opted to stop, because they were sick of the "medicaid paperwork".<br><br>
I wonder, does anyone here know anything about that? Medela has a section on their site for pump rental info... I wonder if anyone could do it, not just a pharmacy, as long as they did all the headache of medicaid paperwork (which, to me, would totally be worth it if that many more babes could breastfeed). That way the low-income mamas could get a nice pump and go back to work. I'd be more than happy to do something like that out of my home if need be! (I'm kindly requesting someone check for me, since I have 28k dialup!)<br><br>
I also think that, while some WICs are BF-friendly, there needs to be more focus on getting nation-wide funding for them to have a paid LC on staff, available by phone to all WIC clients 24/7, etc. I don't know how to go about this kind of thing, though, but it would be a nice idea.<br><br>
Perhaps, this is probably illegal (no idea), if we took all the free formula samples we got, we could buy resell and buy pumps for women's shelters, etc... though I know all the cans are marked "NOT FOR RESALE" and all, yada yada... just wish there was a way we could directly take money from formula companies and buy bf-advocacy items!<br><br>
Otherwise, I have no ideas... it's late, DS is sick, and I'm sleepy <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br>
but I totally know where you're coming from! On a non-lactivistic front, I wish low-income women had more birthing options... mine were unassisted or hospital with high intervention and c/s rates... and DH was NOT about to go for UC!
 

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momma2libby makes excellent points! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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Forgot to mention--- for breastpads, you could either to LilyPadz, which are one pair that you always use... made out of... something... some other mama please come in and explain these. They don't soak up the milk, they work on keeping it in , I think.<br><br>
You could also buy washable breastpads for not too much as well...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>momma2libby</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7944379"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Have YOU called recently? Just because they didn't have them the last time you had a child doesn't mean that they won't have them now. I've heard that the WIC offices have become more breastfeeding friendly all over the country in the past few years. I looked at Washington's WIC website and it says that they support breastfeeding by: "Funding purchases of breast pumps and equipment needed by women who are breastfeeding." <a href="http://www.doh.wa.gov/cfh/WIC/BFpromo.htm" target="_blank">http://www.doh.wa.gov/cfh/WIC/BFpromo.htm</a><br><br>
If you call your county's WIC office and they turn you down you should bring this up and demand a pump.<br><br>
More positive breastfeeding links from your state's WIC office:<br><a href="http://www.doh.wa.gov/cfh/WIC/breastfeeding.htm" target="_blank">http://www.doh.wa.gov/cfh/WIC/breastfeeding.htm</a></div>
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Thanks for the info. The public health nurse from the WIC office who was at my house last friday, told me about the breastpump situation (not providing one unless you have a sick baby). I will print all that out and take it into my appointment tommorow. I actually wont be returning to work for an entire year after my baby is born, due to the fact that I have family who is helping me to stay home with my kids at least for the next year to keep them out of daycare... so I wont need a pump. But... that is a definate issue for low income women.<br><br>
Also, the WIC website can claim all they want talk about how they are breastfeeding friendly yada yada yada, just like there are breastfeeding in public laws... but when it comes to how real people are treated... thats a whole other story.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sunnymw</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7944476"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Forgot to mention--- for breastpads, you could either to LilyPadz, which are one pair that you always use... made out of... something... some other mama please come in and explain these. They don't soak up the milk, they work on keeping it in , I think.<br><br>
You could also buy washable breastpads for not too much as well...</div>
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I have some lily pads and found they dont work when you are new to breastfeeding and leaking alot. They actually stick to your breasts and cause compression and in theory prevent leaking. I always leaked... a lot.
 

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Faithinrosie, you're really brave to come here and share your personal story and your views. I agree with so much of what you say.<br>
As another poster said, there are many avenues in lactivism but they all lead to what the final goal is. I think some people feel called to fight by working to change local legislation, some have their calling to influence others by NIP and helping women directly....the list goes on and on. Your special calling seems to be directed towards low-income women and WIC. I wish you the best on your new one in July. I also had the flat nipples...I understand a little bit what you went through.<br>
Keep being the strong person you are and fight for change as you see fit. Thank you for helping me see another side of lactivism.
 

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faithinrosie,<br>
Thank you so much for the enlightening and thoughtful post. You raise some really excellent points. It is so true that the needs of certain groups are very unique when it comes to issues such as this. There are socio-economic and socio-cultural issues that should always be considered when approaching lactivism (and any other 'ism' for that matter <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">). We must always remember the vital imprtance of never taking a blanket approach to this very human, very complex issue. It is a great failing to forget that. Thanks for the reminder!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>faithinrosie223</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7943651"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I<br>
Come to find out, I had flat nipples. I tried for an hour to get my screaming baby to latch. No success. A nurse brought a nipple sheild, and stated that there was no lactation consultants available on weekends (I delivered on a saturday, was released 24 hours later on a sunday)<br><br>
When my baby was constantly screaming, getting rashes, pooping out blood, and I got mastitis, I called WIC in hopes they had a lactation consultant that could help me. One spoke to me on the phone briefly for about 5 minutes, but said that she would not be able to see me in person. I called Le leche league, and talked to a group leader on the phone, and she stated that she wouldnt be able to help me in person either. (not unless I came to a meeting, that was 2 months away) In desperation, I took my baby to the emergency room. The emergency room diagnosed her with "constipation" and suggested I give her a bottle with caro syrup in it. I did and she threw it all up. Out of desperation once more, I took her to the pediatrician who told me to switch her to formula. There was no talk about how to help me nurse without the sheild, there was no talk about modifying my diet. I played the switching formula game for several months, and discovered that my baby was not only allergic to soy but also the "hypoallergenic" formula. My daughter spend countless days sick with ear infections, and was hospitalized for dehydration.<br>
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I agree with a lot of what you have said.<br>
I had a similar experience. There was no support in my town, no LLL, no LC and the doctor doesn't understand why I just don't use formula. I also finally went back the hospital and there a nurse sat down with me and helped to make sure ds was latching on correctly, but I knew right them, I'm college educated, and kinda pushy, and 27 years old and I was in tears. My sister had a baby at 15. What would she have done?<br><br>
I do think your cost are a bit off. My pump was about 35 dollars and it worked fine. I went back to work when ds was 5 months old and I only pumped once a day. Breast pads were about 7 dollars and probably lasted a month, though some use washables. I didn't use any nipple creams. I did buy some bottles (less than a formula user, though) and some storage bags. I can't believe how much formula cost, though I suppose with WIC, it isn't felt as much.<br><br>
I think in my town we need available LC or an active LLL. Nursing mentors for young moms. Supportive pediatricians <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: On our first visit he actually said this: "At the begiining of the century 30% of babies died because formula hadn't been invented"!!!!
 

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I wish you the best of luck with your baby in July. I do think that the laws are not perfect (that's what we're here for). I do agree that it is probably a bit harder for low income mothers to manage breastfeeding. I guess I just take a little defense because I am a low income mom myself and I've been successful at breastfeeding. I have had to make a lot of financial sacrifices kwim? But I feel like it's all been in the best interest for my child.<br><br>
Again, wishing you the best of luck with the pregnancy and birth of your child and I hope you are more successful at breastfeeding this time around. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Discussion Starter #17
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>momma2libby</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7945227"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Again, wishing you the best of luck with the pregnancy and birth of your child and I hope you are more successful at breastfeeding this time around. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></div>
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Thank you! I learned a lot with my daughter, and dont plan on letting the experience be for nothing. We all live and learn lol. People like you who have overcome the breastfeeding challenges despite some of the issues low income people face, I highly respect. Some day, I hope to help other women to be successful at breastfeeding... First I need to accomplish that myself. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I am very fortunate to have a different situation this time around than I did with my daughter. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Flor</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7945179"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I also finally went back the hospital and there a nurse sat down with me and helped to make sure ds was latching on correctly, but I knew right them, I'm college educated, and kinda pushy, and 27 years old and I was in tears. My sister had a baby at 15. What would she have done?<br></div>
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My thoughts exactly. I am not college educated, but I am quite a bit older than 15... and it was the hardest thing I had ever done. Someday, (maybe by the time my daughter has kids?) I hope to see some kind of mentoring program, especially for teen mothers.<br><br>
Not to mention all the post partum hormones! teens are already going through hormone shifts... add to that the post partum stuff and I honestly dont know how they do it... must be VERY hard. I have an aquaintence I met recently, who was 17 when she had her baby, and she breastfed him for two years. WOW!! I know 35 year old, college educated, professional women who dont do that.
 

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First of all, <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"> I'm sorry you've had such a rough time of it!<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wave.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wave"> I'm a low-income mom. VERY. I was given a VERY nice double electric pump from WIC. The "storage containers" I used to store my milk were the bottles we ended up using, with a disk in the top instead of the nipple. Work HAS to provide you a private place to pump. You get a doctor's note for extra time. (My job eventually stopped paying me for them, but it was 20 minutes every 2 hours, and I already got 1 fifteen minute break, so it wasn't a *huge* deal). Use a bag with one of those "blue ice" things in them to store the milk.<br><br>
I would have had to buy new bras either way, since I grew in size, so why not spend a few extra dollars on a nursing bra? I used disposable breast pads until my supply settled down enough that I was comfortable using the washable ones.<br><br>
Use *us* as your lactation consultants...in fact, some of us (not me <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> ) actually are!<br><br>
All in all, you really have to be committed to succeeding, in order to do it. Not that you did, but if someone isn't committed, they stop very early.<br><br>
Yes, I was very lucky that we had a pretty easy time of breastfeeding. But, I was committed.<br><br>
Oh, and I had an epidural, an emergency c-section in which I was under general, and I nursed at about 2 hours.
 

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While I do agree with you that there needs to be a better system in place, I think that a lot of the things in your list are not necessities.<br>
I was 19, definitely low income and obviously not college educated when we had our first child. I never owned a nursing bra, had one pair of cloth nursing pads, cheap hand me down pump from my cousin.( First years ) , and never used any kind of nipple cream. Sure I was often wet while out in public, especially embarrasing while I was at work, but I was a waitress and could just say I spilled something on myself. I layered clothing, quickly excused myself when I felt a letdown coming on, etc. That being said, I know that I was lucky that nursing came very easily for us, but I did attend BF classes while pg, read books and sought advice from women that I knew had BF'd.<br>
I am kinda 50/50 on this one, part of me feels like if you are determined to BF you will find a way and the other part of me knows that there needs to be a lot of work done in supporting and educating low income and young mothers in the path to successful BF. It has always been my ambition to set up a non-profit designed specifically for young mama to (slightly older ) young mama education and support for BF.<br><br>
Good Luck with your new LO!
 
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