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I really need to use nonstick pan sometimes but don't want to use teflon because it's not safe. What can I use?<br>
Thanks,<br>
Violet
 

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I have found that a properly seasoned cast iron pan is non-stick. I usually do spray a little oil on the skillet while it's heating, but I can make several dozen pancakes with no other spraying or oiling and not have any pancakes stick.
 

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I don't have an alternative, but if you have an electric stove, I wouldn't recommend cast iron. The stove just doesn't get hot enough to get the pan hot enough.<br><br>
I grew up cooking on a gas stove with ONLY cast iron, it was all we owned, but now we have an electric stove (no gas hookup to our house and if we wanted propane it would be a big hassle to get it) and no way can I get a cast iron pot to heat up enough to do anything proper.<br><br>
I personally use stainless steel and then use some non-stick spray. It does a pretty good job most of the time (and when I really want a fluffy, melt in your mouth omelette, I have a tiny non-stick pan that I dig out and use - everything in moderation, I figure).<br><br>
Good luck, I hope some other posters have some good suggestions.
 

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I have an electric stove and my cast iron works wonderfully. It is a flat ceramic top, but I have also had coil burners in the past and they have worked fine, too. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>TwinMom</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I have an electric stove and my cast iron works wonderfully. It is a flat ceramic top, but I have also had coil burners in the past and they have worked fine, too. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"></div>
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That's exactly what I was going to say. Thanks for saving me the time.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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I've heard of something called a "scanpan" that is supposed to be non-stick and safe. I've never used one though, so I can't really say either way.<br><br><a href="http://www.scanpan.com/main/home.aspx" target="_blank">http://www.scanpan.com/main/home.aspx</a><br><br>
PS I have a cast iron that I've been using for about 3 years and I ALWAYS have to grease it. If I didn't, everything would stick like crazy! I do have an electric stove with coils, don't know if that makes a difference.
 

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I use cast iron too (on electric coil set on #3-no higher than 5), it's so well seasoned from use that nothing sticks or if it does, it's so mild that a quick swish under hot water and a wipe of a scratch pad does the trick.<br><br>
anniej, are you sure your stove is working properly? although I'd love to cook with gas again, it really isn't necessary with castiron.
 

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I use cast iron and when my non-stick pan goes I'm going to try to replace it with an enamel covered cast iron, like Le Creuset (I know expensive but guaranteed for 100 years). Mainly b/c I don't like what happens to cast iron or really more the food when I cook tomatoes and/or wine in the pan. Good way to get extra iron but I'm not fond of the taste or the ruining of the seasoning on the pan. I think the NY Times just did a review of 10 different frying pans as alternatives to non-stick and the Le Creuset pan came out on top. Also doubles as a good weapon, like all cast iron.
 

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I've had Le Creuset pans before, and I didn't particularly like them compared to cast iron. For stuff like tomato sauce, etc, it probably would work well. But in terms of searing and pan frying, I find that if I raise the temperature too high, it sticks but if I don't raise it high enough, the food tastes kind of boiled.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>kallyn</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">PS I have a cast iron that I've been using for about 3 years and I ALWAYS have to grease it. If I didn't, everything would stick like crazy! I do have an electric stove with coils, don't know if that makes a difference.</div>
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I love, love my cast iron. It's very nonstick, even the one I've only had for a month. One thing I noticed is that cast iron will carmelize the surface of meats and anything you're cooking which gives a nice seared flavor. Because of that, things may seem like they are sticking, but if you use a nice straight metal spatula on it, it lifts right off. When I first got a cast iron, I was really frustrated cause everything was sticking since I was still using my old plastic spatula that I used with the teflon. It wasn't until I got a decent metal spatula that things started turning out beautifully.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>kallyn</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">PS I have a cast iron that I've been using for about 3 years and I ALWAYS have to grease it. If I didn't, everything would stick like crazy! I do have an electric stove with coils, don't know if that makes a difference.</div>
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I've had mine for less than a year, and I have an electric stove. Mine are finally becoming non stick. I started using a round nylon mesh scrubby with cold water to wash them out, and when I started doing that, they quickly became nonstick.
 

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Have you tried just using lots and lots of butter? Works for me <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/yummy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yummy">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>TwinMom</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I have an electric stove and my cast iron works wonderfully. It is a flat ceramic top, but I have also had coil burners in the past and they have worked fine, too. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"></div>
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I thought you weren't supposed to use cast iron on a ceramic flat top? That's what I have, and the instruction booklet says not to use cast iron, I think b/c it can scratch/break the surface more easily.
 

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The key to keeping cast iron nonstick is seasoning. I season mine once a year in a self clean mode in the oven. Also, something I learned if you're browning something things will stick if you try to flip them over too soon. Patience is my greatest lesson from learning to cook. So if you find something sticking when you want to flip it over give it a few more seconds. I've also used it on electric and gas with no problems. Personally I prefer gas b/c it's what I grew up with and I like the control.<br><br>
I have a Le Creuset dutch oven and have never had a problem with stuff sticking or boiling when I was getting ready to braise. Stuff steams if I overcrowd it in my pan but that's about it.
 

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we use cast iron (mostly le creuset pants i was gifted! w00t!) on our flat top electric stove, too, with no problems.<br><br>
it's totally nonstick, too. i just made eggs this morning.
 

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what cleaning compound would one use on regular cast iron. Something that doesn't "un-season" the pan. i've heard table salt is sufficient. Other ideas? tia.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Free2BMe</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">what cleaning compound would one use on regular cast iron. Something that doesn't "un-season" the pan. i've heard table salt is sufficient. Other ideas? tia.</div>
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I don't use anything but a scrubby sponge and water.
 

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That's what I do, too, but if a little sticky bit remains, I use the table salt. Thanks for confirming that hot water is sufficient. I always wonder.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/blush.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="blush">
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Free2BMe</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">what cleaning compound would one use on regular cast iron. Something that doesn't "un-season" the pan. i've heard table salt is sufficient. Other ideas? tia.</div>
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To clean my cast iron, I use very hot water and a sponge with the scrubby side.
 

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I second the cast iron pan....<br>
We love ours and have a coiled electric stove.<br>
To clean we just use hot water and if needed a little castile soap.<br>
Then reoiled...we love to use our iron...and do just about every night!
 

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My dh was a cookware buyer so we have tons of different types of pans. We have non-stick and use it without guilt. A happy medium between non-stick and castiron or stainless would be a Calphalon hard-anodized pan. They cook like stainless, but clean up easier. No coating on those pans like a non-stick. My philosophy on non-stick is that as long as you're not using it to cook everything, and it's not peeling off the pan, it's ok. New non-stick is better than old. If it's an old non-stick, get rid of it. The technology on that stuff is way better than it used to be. My $.02...
 
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