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I have been working as a nurse per diem (paid more per hour with no bennies but flex schedule) for about 3 months now but a divorce is forcing me back to work fulltime. I had previously been told by my charge nurse that the regular positions were paid about $2 less per hour. Yet, when I applied for and was offered a position as a fulltime RN, the recruiter quoted me $4 per hour less. I was taken by surprise, haven't signed any paperwork yet because it wasn't ready but am beginning to think they may be trying to take advantage of me because they know I am getting divorced and have a young son to provide for.

Any ideas on how to handle this? It works out to about $3500 less per year (around $150 less per paycheck) but all of my future salary increases will be based upon this rate so if I start out lower, I will always be lower... ON the other hand, I don't want to pass this job up, day shift is REALLY hard to get as a nurse and they are letting me officially start after the holidays so we can take our trip to see family and ski. Of course they are getting someone who is already hired so no additional costs to do background/ref. checks or training costs. I have over 20 years experience too. Would like some suggestions on how this can be win-win. Thanks!
 

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Perhaps the coworker who told you $2/hr less was referring to others who are no longer at a starting salary. I would bring it up, ask what kind of salary scale they work on or how/when you might expect increases. I am guessing that in a hospital setting, it is probably administered through a pretty formal grading for positions, with set salary scales.

It is not unusual for PT positions without benefits to be making more gross income than salaried staff with benefits. Benefits definately have a vaule to the employee that the company must pay for.

If you want to negotiate, your 20 years of service is probably your best card to play. When we have PT staff who become FT, their years of PT service get prorated at 50%. IE if you have been here PT for 6 years, that counts as 3 years of FT service. This makes a difference for things like vacation time and pension and service awards.

You've hit the nail on the head. The company gets a "guaranteed" product with you. They know your performance, they don't need to put out any money to recruit or train you. Work with this and see where you get.

Be prepared to make concrete demands. "More" is not enough. You need to be able to say "I want to be at the same salary as someone in the job 10 years" or "I want x% more to start".
 

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I totally agtee with the ppp. I would lso look at the value of the benefits you are receiving and see if the difference bewtween the 2 and 4 dollars less is made up for in the benefit package. The person you spoke with may also be basing her response on wages at a time when the hospital offered less benefits or a different benefiut package/diff provider that cost them less. Healthcare increases affect everyone...
I would also think about whet you might want to ask for beyond salary... Men are much better at this than women...they tend to ask for the MOON but they end up half way there when all is said and done...
What about addittional paid leave or first refusal on a choice schedule if someone leaves, etc.? Theink of what else would benefit you a lot but at little to no monetary cost to them...then get it in writing.
Good luck!!
 
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