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Talk to me about sea salt! We got the gray stuff (well, it's some French Celtic sea salt, not the Himalayan salt recommended by NT -- I couldn't do it, I just couldn't pay $11 for salt! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Duck">: ). Now, how do you sprinkle it onto your food? It's too moist for a regular salt shaker. We have one of those salt cellars with the teensy spoon (irresistable toddler toy btw <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"> ), but the salt is too sticky to sprinkle evenly, you know what I mean?<br><br>
We're using our fingers, but I'm wondering if there's a better way.
 

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Put a tablespoon of white rice in your salt shaker. The rice either: (a) absorbs moisture, and/or (b) moves against the salt crystals and breaks them up so they come out. Both of my grandmothers did this, and now I do it with sea salt. (and I used to do it for regular salt - it keeps it from caking in the shaker) It works for us!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>ASusan</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8200132"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Put a tablespoon of white rice in your salt shaker. The rice either: (a) absorbs moisture, and/or (b) moves against the salt crystals and breaks them up so they come out. Both of my grandmothers did this, and now I do it with sea salt. (and I used to do it for regular salt - it keeps it from caking in the shaker) It works for us!</div>
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Do you think this would work for the coarse ground? And does it have to be white rice or would brown rice work ok too? I have caorse ground celtic gray sea salt and use it in cooking where it dissolves fine, but it just clogs up the gears, so to speak, in the mill. Right now I have the more refined coarse "sea" salt from Frontier in there, but I'd much prefer to just use the Celtic gray.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>naturemama1</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8198584"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">We're using our fingers, but I'm wondering if there's a better way.</div>
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That's what i do.
 

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I use a little pepper grinder for my celtic sea salt. Its one of those small jars with the grinder in teh lid that you can get prefilled with peppercorns, when the corns were gone I used it for salt...works well<br><br>
Tanya
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Tcarwyn</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8202008"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I use a little pepper grinder for my celtic sea salt. Its one of those small jars with the grinder in teh lid that you can get prefilled with peppercorns, when the corns were gone I used it for salt...works well</div>
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Be careful of this. Salt is corrosive. Usually these grinders are made of metal.<br><br>
When you buy a grinder intended for salt, it will be made of ceramic (which is not subject to corrosion).
 

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I've only seen it done with white rice, but I don't know why brown wouldn't work. Can't hurt to try.<br><br>
I would think it would work with course ground, as long as the crystals of salt are small enough to actually fit through the holes of your salt shaker.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>cristeen</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8202743"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Be careful of this. Salt is corrosive. Usually these grinders are made of metal.<br><br>
When you buy a grinder intended for salt, it will be made of ceramic (which is not subject to corrosion).</div>
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<br>
actually...its plastic <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Duck">: ..the container is glass...hmmm, had not thought about the corrosion factor....I wonder......thanks <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Tanya
 

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I just ordered a wooden mortar and pestle for my celtic coarse grind salt. Having it in the mortar and pestle gives it the chance to dry in open air, and you can just leave it out and grind it as you need it. I got this idea from HerthElde while visiting at her house this winter.
 

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We also use a wooden morter and pestle. We keep our grey salt that we get in bulk in a large glass jar and take a small handful out as needed. You can then grind it to desired consistancy. We pass it around the table this way and leave it on the counter until we need another pinch.<br><br>
I've heard that some people don't recommend leaving their salt out, exposed like this though, b/c salt is also an energy cleanser and can absorb excess junk hanging out in the corners of your kitchen. We use it so quickly that I rarely worry about this though.
 

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I have one of those ceramic salt grinders from napastyle.com that I got about 3 years ago along with the grey salt that Michael Chiarello sells (that's before I knew other places to get salt from less expensively though, though the grinder has worked great).
 

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I have a salt pig with a wooden spoon (smallest bamboo one from Pampered Chef). I don't put salt on the table for the kids to self-salt. Is that a term? Here's a salt pig for the curious:<br><a href="http://www.kitchen-classics.com/salt_pig.htm" target="_blank">http://www.kitchen-classics.com/salt_pig.htm</a><br>
Mine doesn't have such a big snout, though!
 

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I usually save the coarse ground for cooking and use something finer ground for the salt shaker. I either use a "less good" salt, or splurge for finely ground "good salt" that we use in very small amounts.<br><br>
Another option would be to get a salt mill (or a fresh new pepper mill) and put the course ground stuff in there, then grind it fine as you need it.
 

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I use the coarse grey sea salt for cooking, in dishes where it has a chance to dissolve, but for other applications such as shaking onto food that's ready to eat, adding to quick-cooking things like scrambled eggs (where the coarse salt would still be chunks by the time the cooking is done), baking, etc., I use Real Salt. It's also technically "sea salt" because it's mined from an ancient sea bed that is now buried underground, and it is unrefined so has the full complement of minerals in sea salt. It's dry and finely ground, so it shakes just fine out of a regular salt shaker, and it measures and disperses much better than coarse, damp salt. I used to use only coarse grey Celtic sea salt, had a nice salt mill with ceramic grinders which always would get gummed up from the moisture and was very tedious to use (want enough salt to season scrambled eggs for the whole family? grind, grind, grind, grind, grind, grind, grind......'til you get repetitive stress injury in your wrist), tried grinding it with a mortar and pestle for things like baking but still couldn't get it fine enough for my preference without what felt like an hour of grinding. I'm much happier with the salt situation using Real Salt for some things, it makes my life in the kitchen easier and I don't feel that it's a nutritional compromise.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Tcarwyn</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8203104"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">actually...its plastic <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Duck">: ..the container is glass...hmmm, had not thought about the corrosion factor....I wonder......thanks <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Tanya</div>
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How do you get the dang thing open? I've tried unsuccessfully and just came to the conclusion that the makers didn't want me refilling it.
 
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